Multi-tasking is a waste of time!

by: Andrew Cox

http://www.addtodesign.com/freelance/multi-tasking-is-a-waste-of-time

My desk is a mess. My desktop is full of icons. My in-box is overflowing. I have a list of people to get in touch with. I have what feels like a hundred decisions to make…. does this sound familiar? I have a horrible case of Multi-tasking-itis…

In the same boat? Click here for a fantastic FREE remedy – Simpleology

I don’t know what has happened… work seemed to creep up on me… like the grey hairs invading my scalp!

It feels like I’m working three or more jobs. Paperwork, administration, design, accounting, writing, marketing, coach and local tech consultant.

While it is great to be ‘busy’ and to have lots of things on the go – I’m not complaining 🙂 – one thing has become clearly apparent… MULTI-TASKING IS A WASTE OF TIME!!

I know that this is not a breakthrough discovery, however, it is a great reminder – we produce mediocre results when we don’t give things our full attention.

Moreover, we waste time as we move from one task to another… losing our place… avoiding aspects of a ‘boring’ task… procrastinating… wearing down our enthusiasm… brain farting… building up stress etc.

If you want to do great work, avoid multi-tasking and focus on one thing at a time. Finish it and move on to the next thing.

Yes, it means some things aren’t going to get done as fast as some people may want. It means some people aren’t going to get your full attention for a while. But producing a lot of mediocre work, or making a heap of poorly considered decisions just to get through the pile isn’t worth it.

Stop… take a break… stretch… walk around and then come back to finish one task – then give yourself a pat on the back and move on to the next one. You will feel better – I guarantee it!

7 websites (in no particular order) to help you slow down, get focused and prioritise…


Multi-tasking is a waste of time!

My desk is a mess. My desktop is full of icons. My in-box is overflowing. I have a list of people to get in touch with. I have what feels like a hundred decisions to make…. does this sound familiar? I have a horrible case of Multi-tasking-itis…

In the same boat? Click here for a fantastic FREE remedy – Simpleology

I don’t know what has happened… work seemed to creep up on me… like the grey hairs invading my scalp!

It feels like I’m working three or more jobs. Paperwork, administration, design, accounting, writing, marketing, coach and local tech consultant.

While it is great to be ‘busy’ and to have lots of things on the go – I’m not complaining :) – one thing has become clearly apparent… MULTI-TASKING IS A WASTE OF TIME!!

I know that this is not a breakthrough discovery, however, it is a great reminder – we produce mediocre results when we don’t give things our full attention.

Moreover, we waste time as we move from one task to another… losing our place… avoiding aspects of a ‘boring’ task… procrastinating… wearing down our enthusiasm… brain farting… building up stress etc.

If you want to do great work, avoid multi-tasking and focus on one thing at a time. Finish it and move on to the next thing.

Yes, it means some things aren’t going to get done as fast as some people may want. It means some people aren’t going to get your full attention for a while. But producing a lot of mediocre work, or making a heap of poorly considered decisions just to get through the pile isn’t worth it.

Stop… take a break… stretch… walk around and then come back to finish one task – then give yourself a pat on the back and move on to the next one. You will feel better – I guarantee it!

7 websites (in no particular order) to help you slow down, get focused and prioritise… Leer más “Multi-tasking is a waste of time!”

How to Blog Like Bond. James Bond.

When it comes to being a badass, few can hold a candle to good old 007.

Calm, cool, and collected under pressure, Bond is known as much for his seductive personality as he is for his incredible ability to get himself out of any situation in one piece.

What he isn’t known for is writing a successful blog.

But everyone’s favorite fictional, womanizing secret agent has more to do with writing killer copy and running a great site than you might think.

Here a few things you can learn about great blogging from everyone’s favorite snappy dresser/sex addict/paid assassin.
Know exactly who you are

From the specific type of drink he orders (martini, shaken not stirred) to the unique presence he commands when walking into a room, James Bond always knows exactly who he is (yes, I realize I sound like an American Idol judge, but it remains true).

When you’re dealing with James Bond, you know what you’re going to get. If you’re a psychopathic villain bent on world domination, you don’t want to find out that Bond is on your case because you’re most likely going to end up dead.
Readers should know exactly who you are within minutes of coming to your site.

* When you visit Copyblogger, you know you’re going to learn how to write great content that builds both your business and your reputation.
* When you visit The Art of Nonconformity, you expect a point of view that challenges the status quo. You also learn very quickly that author Chris Guillebeau has made it his mission to visit every country in the world.
* When you visit Man Vs Debt.com, you know you’re getting a guy trying to destroy his debt.
* Spend three minutes on any of Gary Vaynerchuk’s sites and you feel like you’ve known the guy for years.

Your reader should know not only who you are but also what you’re providing within just a few lines.

It took me nine months of writing every day before I finally found the right “voice” and felt confident enough to use it. Once I finally embraced my personality and injected it into each post, my site really caught on with new readers and became much more enjoyable for me to write.


by Steve Kamb | //copyblogger.com

image of martini glass

When it comes to being a badass, few can hold a candle to good old 007.

Calm, cool, and collected under pressure, Bond is known as much for his seductive personality as he is for his incredible ability to get himself out of any situation in one piece.

What he isn’t known for is writing a successful blog.

But everyone’s favorite fictional, womanizing secret agent has more to do with writing killer copy and running a great site than you might think.

Here a few things you can learn about great blogging from everyone’s favorite snappy dresser/sex addict/paid assassin.

Know exactly who you are

From the specific type of drink he orders (martini, shaken not stirred) to the unique presence he commands when walking into a room, James Bond always knows exactly who he is (yes, I realize I sound like an American Idol judge, but it remains true).

When you’re dealing with James Bond, you know what you’re going to get. If you’re a psychopathic villain bent on world domination, you don’t want to find out that Bond is on your case because you’re most likely going to end up dead.

Readers should know exactly who you are within minutes of coming to your site.

  • When you visit Copyblogger, you know you’re going to learn how to write great content that builds both your business and your reputation.
  • When you visit The Art of Nonconformity, you expect a point of view that challenges the status quo. You also learn very quickly that author Chris Guillebeau has made it his mission to visit every country in the world.
  • When you visit Man Vs Debt.com, you know you’re getting a guy trying to destroy his debt.
  • Spend three minutes on any of Gary Vaynerchuk’s sites and you feel like you’ve known the guy for years.

Your reader should know not only who you are but also what you’re providing within just a few lines.

It took me nine months of writing every day before I finally found the right “voice” and felt confident enough to use it. Once I finally embraced my personality and injected it into each post, my site really caught on with new readers and became much more enjoyable for me to write. Leer más “How to Blog Like Bond. James Bond.”

The Cure for Creative Blocks? Leave Your Desk

Everyday between 8:00 and 8:30am writer Stephen King arrives at his desk with a cup of tea. He turns on some music, takes his daily vitamin, and begins to work – exactly as he began the day before. Using this routine, King has produced well over 50 books, averaging 1-2 novels a year since 1974 when he published Carrie. Clearly, daily routines can be incredibly valuable. That is, until they’re not.While familiarity, organization, and discipline can be powerful agents of productive creativity, there is a “tipping point” – when these same once-fruitful qualities transform into creativity killers. In his great TED talk on time off, graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister recounts the feeling of stuckness that prompted a massive change for him:


by Jocelyn K. Glei
Everyday between 8:00 and 8:30am writer Stephen King arrives at his desk with a cup of tea. He turns on some music, takes his daily vitamin, and begins to work – exactly as he began the day before. Using this routine, King has produced well over 50 books, averaging 1-2 novels a year since 1974 when he published Carrie. Clearly, daily routines can be incredibly valuable. That is, until they’re not.While familiarity, organization, and discipline can be powerful agents of productive creativity, there is a “tipping point” – when these same once-fruitful qualities transform into creativity killers. In his great TED talk on time off, graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister recounts the feeling of stuckness that prompted a massive change for him: Leer más “The Cure for Creative Blocks? Leave Your Desk”

Kiss your workload goodbye

Research shows 90 per cent of managers drown in the classic time wasters such as meetings, dealing with crises, mediating disputes and micro-managing instead of delegating, outsourcing or ignoring them altogether.
Heike Bruch and Sumantra Ghoshal’s research in the Harvard Business Review found only 10 per cent of managers spent time on work that had a long-term benefit to the business.


KATH LOCKETT

Research shows 90 per cent of managers drown in the classic time wasters such as meetings, dealing with crises, mediating disputes and micro-managing instead of delegating, outsourcing or ignoring them altogether.
Heike Bruch and Sumantra Ghoshal‘s research in the Harvard Business Review found only 10 per cent of managers spent time on work that had a long-term benefit to the business.