IMPROVE YOUR WRITING WITH GRAMMAR.NET’S GRAMMAR CHECKER FOR FREE


 

With Grammar.net’s Grammar Checker you can check and correct grammar and spelling mistakes and use Thesaurus feature to find synonyms.

It’s easy to check your texts using our Grammar Checker – just download this Free program. Then you need to highlight the text you want to check and press CTRL+G button. Or use Grammar.net’s Rich Text for editing and checking your text with rich mark-up, just copy-paste it and then check your text. Leer más “IMPROVE YOUR WRITING WITH GRAMMAR.NET’S GRAMMAR CHECKER FOR FREE”

The Magazine Issues in New Era of Writing | theindustry.cc


It’s not very often that a product or service redefines the market in which it resides. However, Marco Arment has done exactly that with his latest project, The Magazine. The Magazine is a subscription-based application that delivers stories; stories that bring technology and writing to a crossroad. Marco specifically states in his foreword, though, that at times it will go beyond technology at times when he feels it fits his vision for The Magazine.

The Magazine 01 The Magazine Issues in New Era of Writing

Writing

Arment’s unique vision delivers these stories in a beautiful design, while being wonderfully written by a grand curation of writers.

Rather than telling readers everything that happens in technology, we deliver meaningful editorial and big-picture articles.

Full history
http://theindustry.cc/2012/10/16/the-magazine-issues-in-new-era-of-writing/

10 Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy | de los tipos que rompieron el molde…


http://bit.ly/LF9w3t

by  | brainpickings.org

“Never write more than two pages on any subject.”

How is your new year’s resolution to read more and write better holding up? After tracing the fascinating story of the most influential writing style guide of all time and absorbing advice on writing from some of modern history’s most legendary writers, here comes some priceless and pricelessly uncompromising wisdom from a very different kind of cultural legend: iconic businessman and original “Mad Man” David Ogilvy. On September 7th, 1982, Ogilvy sent the following internal memo to all agency employees, titled “How to Write”:

The better you write, the higher you go in Ogilvy & Mather. People who think well, write well.

Woolly minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters and woolly speeches.

Good writing is not a natural gift. You have to learn to write well. Here are 10 hints:

1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times.

2. Write the way you talk. Naturally.

3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs.

4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize,demassificationattitudinallyjudgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass.

5. Never write more than two pages on any subject.

6. Check your quotations.

7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning — and then edit it.

8. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it.

9. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do.

10. If you want ACTION, don’t write. Go and tell the guy what you want.

David Leer más “10 Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy | de los tipos que rompieron el molde…”

The 4 Keys to Writing Persuasive Copy Without Hype, BS, or Other Icky Gimmicks

How to write conversationally

Don’t write—tell. The best way to get started is not to write at all—but to speak.

Ideally, record yourself talking about your topic with a friend you know and trust. That way, you’ll avoid most of the self-consciousness that comes when you get out a voice recorder and try to record yourself talking to the air.

Then play back your recording and just listen to what you say. Take notes. How do your sentences sound? How often do you break the rules of formal grammar? I bet it’s all the time. So forget formal grammar. How often do you say something that in retrospect sounds totally gitty? Pretty often too, probably. So figure out what you wish you’d said, and use that instead. Write like you talk, but with the benefit of lots of time to choose your words. It’ll be a lot easier to read—because people read with an internal monologue. When you write conversationally, they can hear your words flow.


 

http://blog.kissmetrics.com


 

You should already know that clarity trumps persuasion for making sales. In fact, to borrow a metaphor from direct-response expert Dean Rieck, your copy should be like a shop window—completely invisible, affording a perfect view of the thing you’re selling.

But as with most important things in life, that’s easier said than done.

Fortunately—as with most things in life—much of the mystery can be removed by adopting a system that takes care of the basics. So let me introduce you to my Four Keys for writing clear, shiny copy that affords prospects the perfect view of whatever it is you’re selling.

Key #1: Conversational style

I’m sure you’ve heard it said that people don’t buy from websites—they buy from people.

And I’m sure you’ve also heard that people seldom buy from people they don’t like and trust.

Which is why hyped highlighter copy doesn’t tend to work. There’s no real personal connection, because it doesn’t read like anything a person would say—certainly not a person you’d be inclined to like or trust.

The same goes for verbose, puffed-up “corporatese”. No one talks like that—and if they did we’d assume there was something ludicrously wrong with them.

The solution is to write like you would talk.

Simple, right? So simple you probably reckon there’s no need to read the rest of this section—but you’d be wrong.

Because actually, writing like you talk is hard, and you’ll likely fail at it to start with. That’s because you have to make a shift in your thinking before it will click for you.

You have to get out of “Writing Mode”… Leer más “The 4 Keys to Writing Persuasive Copy Without Hype, BS, or Other Icky Gimmicks”

Proposal Writing

I work at a Web development company and we’ve experimented with proposal writing a lot over the years. We’ve seen the good and the bad, and we have found something better. In this article I will share the pains that we have experienced in the proposal writing process, the solution we adopted, and our process for carrying out that solution. I’ll also give you guidelines to help you know when this solution is and isn’t appropriate.

Proposal Writing Causes Pain
After several years of writing proposals, we began to notice that something wasn’t right. As we considered the problem we noticed varying levels of pain associated with the proposal writing process. We categorized those pains as follows:

The Rush
Getting a proposal done was usually about speed. We were racing against the clock and working hard to deliver the proposal as efficiently and as effectively as possible. However, sometimes corners would get cut. We’d reuse bits and pieces from older proposals, checking and double-checking for any references to the previous project. While the adrenaline helped, the rush gets old because you know that, deep down, it’s not your best work. Besides, you don’t even know if you’re going to close the deal, which leads to the next pain.

The Risk
Our proposal close ratio with clients that came directly to us was high. We’d work hard on the proposals and more often than not, we’d close the deal. The risk was still there, however, and I can think of several proposals that we had spent a lot of time and effort on for a deal that we didn’t get. Not getting the deal isn’t the problem — the problem is going in and investing time and energy in a thorough proposal without knowing if there is even the likelihood that you’re going to close the deal.
The Details
The difference between a project’s success and its failure is in the details. In proposal writing, the details are in the scope. What work is included, what is not, and how tight is the scope? Now, this is where the “rush” and the “risk” play their part. The rush typically causes us to spend less time on details and the “risk” says: “Why spell it all out and do the diligence when you might not even get the project?” A self-fulfilling prophecy, perhaps, but a legitimate concern nonetheless. Selling a project without making the details clear is asking for scope creep, and turns what started out as a great project into a learning experience that can last for years.
Now, writing is an important part of the project and I’m not about to say you shouldn’t write. Having a written document ensures that all parties involved are on the same page and completely clear on exactly what will be delivered and how it will be delivered. What I’m saying, though, is that you should stop writing proposals.


By  | http://www.smashingmagazine.com

After several grueling days I had finally finished the proposal. I sent it off and waited for a response. Nothing. After a few weeks, I discovered that they were “just looking”. Despite the urgency and aggressive timeline for the RFP (Request For Proposal) plus the fact that we had done business with this organization before, the project was a no-go. My days of effort were wasted. Not entirely, though, because the pain of that loss was enough to drive me to decide that it wouldn’t happen again.

I work at a Web development company and we’ve experimented with proposal writing a lot over the years. We’ve seen the good and the bad, and we have found something better. In this article I will share the pains that we have experienced in the proposal writing process, the solution we adopted, and our process for carrying out that solution. I’ll also give you guidelines to help you know when this solution is and isn’t appropriate.

Proposal Writing Causes Pain

After several years of writing proposals, we began to notice that something wasn’t right. As we considered the problem we noticed varying levels of pain associated with the proposal writing process. We categorized those pains as follows:

  • The Rush
    Getting a proposal done was usually about speed. We were racing against the clock and working hard to deliver the proposal as efficiently and as effectively as possible. However, sometimes corners would get cut. We’d reuse bits and pieces from older proposals, checking and double-checking for any references to the previous project. While the adrenaline helped, the rush gets old because you know that, deep down, it’s not your best work. Besides, you don’t even know if you’re going to close the deal, which leads to the next pain.
  • The Risk
    Our proposal close ratio with clients that came directly to us was high. We’d work hard on the proposals and more often than not, we’d close the deal. The risk was still there, however, and I can think of several proposals that we had spent a lot of time and effort on for a deal that we didn’t get. Not getting the deal isn’t the problem — the problem is going in and investing time and energy in a thorough proposal without knowing if there is even the likelihood that you’re going to close the deal.
  • The Details
    The difference between a project’s success and its failure is in the details. In proposal writing, the details are in the scope. What work is included, what is not, and how tight is the scope? Now, this is where the “rush” and the “risk” play their part. The rush typically causes us to spend less time on details and the “risk” says: “Why spell it all out and do the diligence when you might not even get the project?” A self-fulfilling prophecy, perhaps, but a legitimate concern nonetheless. Selling a project without making the details clear is asking for scope creep, and turns what started out as a great project into a learning experience that can last for years.

Now, writing is an important part of the project and I’m not about to say you shouldn’t write. Having a written document ensures that all parties involved are on the same page and completely clear on exactly what will be delivered and how it will be delivered. What I’m saying, though, is that you should stop writing proposals.

Write Evaluations, Not Proposals

Write Evaluations, Not Proposals — And Charge For Them… Leer más “Proposal Writing”

Do Short Posts Deliver on Value?

I write long.

It’s a bit of a fault of mine, actually. I feel that long posts are just … better, somehow. Fuller. Richer. More valuable. I feel that long posts give you all the goods, everything you need, all in one place.

Long posts are hard work, though. Delivering that much value and information in a single post without losing a reader’s attention is tough. And if a reader decides it’s too much work to get to the end…

Well. That’s no good, is it? Then nothing gets read. All that hard work goes to waste.

So each time I write blog posts, I’m mindful of my tendency to write long. Sometimes my first drafts extend well over 1,500 words. Then I trim and edit and cut and snip until they’re back down to something manageable.

Truth be told, that isn’t always fun.

In fact, some people have asked that I shorten posts down. That I deliver fast bites with impact, that I publish quick messages they can grasp in an instant. They want to hear what I have to say… they just don’t have the time to read it all.

This isn’t new. Other thought leaders write short. Chris Brogan publishes posts that are just a few paragraphs. Not always, but sometimes. Seth Godin has mastered the short post and his audience loves him for it. Julien’s posts get straight to the point.

And it works…


Written by Jameshttp://menwithpens.ca/ 

I write long.

It’s a bit of a fault of mine, actually. I feel that long posts are just … better, somehow. Fuller. Richer. More valuable. I feel that long posts give you all the goods, everything you need, all in one place.

Long posts are hard work, though. Delivering that much value and information in a single post without losing a reader’s attention is tough. And if a reader decides it’s too much work to get to the end…

Well. That’s no good, is it? Then nothing gets read. All that hard work goes to waste.

So each time I write blog posts, I’m mindful of my tendency to write long. Sometimes my first drafts extend well over 1,500 words. Then I trim and edit and cut and snip until they’re back down to something manageable.

Truth be told, that isn’t always fun.

In fact, some people have asked that I shorten posts down. That I deliver fast bites with impact, that I publish quick messages they can grasp in an instant. They want to hear what I have to say… they just don’t have the time to read it all.

This isn’t new. Other thought leaders write short. Chris Brogan publishes posts that are just a few paragraphs. Not always, but sometimes. Seth Godin has mastered the short post and his audience loves him for it. Julien’s posts get straight to the point.

And it works… Leer más “Do Short Posts Deliver on Value?”

Do Short Posts Deliver on Value?

So each time I write blog posts, I’m mindful of my tendency to write long. Sometimes my first drafts extend well over 1,500 words. Then I trim and edit and cut and snip until they’re back down to something manageable.

Truth be told, that isn’t always fun.

In fact, some people have asked that I shorten posts down. That I deliver fast bites with impact, that I publish quick messages they can grasp in an instant. They want to hear what I have to say… they just don’t have the time to read it all.

This isn’t new. Other thought leaders write short. Chris Brogan publishes posts that are just a few paragraphs. Not always, but sometimes. Seth Godin has mastered the short post and his audience loves him for it. Julien’s posts get straight to the point.

And it works. [Más…]

I’ve always thought that short posts were the cheap way out, honestly, which is why I suppose I developed the habit of writing long. I thought short posts were a cop-out. That somehow, they didn’t deliver value. That they lacked in substance or that the author couldn’t be bothered to write and just tossed it off.

But I’m beginning to think a little differently about short posts.

It would feel relieving to slam out a fast, impactful, thought-provoking message as it struck me than have to reserve hours out of my week to craft and hone those long posts into reader-worthy length. It would be better, too, because I have a lot to say, and I could say more of it if writing wasn’t such a time-consuming chore.

Don’t get me wrong. I like writing. And I like writing long.

But I’m no longer sure it’s necessary – at least, not for every post.

Would you prefer to read something that’s really good that doesn’t take forever to read? I know I do when I visit other blogs – we’re all busy, after all.


I write long.

It’s a bit of a fault of mine, actually. I feel that long posts are just … better, somehow. Fuller. Richer. More valuable. I feel that long posts give you all the goods, everything you need, all in one place.

Long posts are hard work, though. Delivering that much value and information in a single post without losing a reader’s attention is tough. And if a reader decides it’s too much work to get to the end…

Well. That’s no good, is it? Then nothing gets read. All that hard work goes to waste.

So each time I write blog posts, I’m mindful of my tendency to write long. Sometimes my first drafts extend well over 1,500 words. Then I trim and edit and cut and snip until they’re back down to something manageable.

Truth be told, that isn’t always fun.

In fact, some people have asked that I shorten posts down. That I deliver fast bites with impact, that I publish quick messages they can grasp in an instant. They want to hear what I have to say… they just don’t have the time to read it all.

This isn’t new. Other thought leaders write short. Chris Brogan publishes posts that are just a few paragraphs. Not always, but sometimes. Seth Godin has mastered the short post and his audience loves him for it. Julien’s posts get straight to the point.

And it works. Leer más “Do Short Posts Deliver on Value?”

Five Ways to Write Magnificent Copy

Most writing could be better.

Not just a little better — significantly better.

If you start out with a solid topic, a good knowledge of your audience, and a reasonable degree of writing ability, you’ll usually end up with a pretty good piece of writing.

But you don’t have to settle for “pretty good.” A little attention to the final details can kick “pretty good” to “magnificent.”

Whether you’re creating blog posts, special reports, sales letters, a video script, email autoresponders, or whatever else, you can take your writing up a level just by applying some simple principles…: [Más…]
1. Write drunk; edit sober

Now you don’t have to take this literally. I don’t really mean you should be downing rum as your fingers meander with increasing sluggishness and inaccuracy over your keyboard.

I’m looking at the principle behind this gem from Papa Hemingway. The principle which is absolutely vital to producing compelling copy that gets people reading and buying: you must sound real.

Persuasion is mostly a matter of education and building trust, and it’s hard to build trust when you write like a corporate drone.

Too many copywriters slip into an overly formal style because they think it makes them sound important. Bad idea. No one wants to read stiff, formal copy with all the personality of a fax machine.

Better to put too much personality in and have to edit it out later than not put enough in to begin with.

When you write, make sure you have some passion for your topic — and then just tell your reader what you want to say. Don’t self-consciously write. Just tell.

Enthusiasm creates reader involvement. Most writing has too little enthusiasm, not too much. But if you really feel you went off the deep end, you can always tone it down in the edit.

It’s hard to insert life into copy that never had any to begin with.
2. Sleep on it

If this isn’t the most important technique for improving copy, then it’s definitely in the top two after “learn to read and write.”

Simply put: You can improve any piece of writing by letting it sit overnight.

Look, I know you’re in a hurry. I know you’re really excited about what you just wrote. So am I.

I know you’re like a kid at Christmas and you just have to send it off right now to receive the praise and glory you absolutely deserve.

But don’t.

In the cold light of a new day, all writing seems slightly less marvelous and slightly more open to improvement.

With the perspective that a night away from writing will give you, you’ll see that what you thought was a flawless masterpiece could actually do with a tweak here and a sharp cut there. The changes you make at this stage are 80% of what you need to turn good copy into magnificent copy.


image of hands on keyboard

Most writing could be better.

Not just a little better — significantly better.

If you start out with a solid topic, a good knowledge of your audience, and a reasonable degree of writing ability, you’ll usually end up with a pretty good piece of writing.

But you don’t have to settle for “pretty good.” A little attention to the final details can kick “pretty good” to “magnificent.”

Whether you’re creating blog posts, special reports, sales letters, a video script, email autoresponders, or whatever else, you can take your writing up a level just by applying some simple principles…: Leer más “Five Ways to Write Magnificent Copy”

Writing Juices, Connecting Guest Writers With Blogging Communities

Writing Juices is an upcoming platform being masterminded by Nenuno Creative and Design Juices where are aim is to connect guest writers with established blogging communities.

It is something we have been thinking about a lot recently and now we have the resources to put our ideas into action.
Our Aim

The reason behind Writing Juices is that we know it can be a struggle to find a blog that we would like to contribute to. There are so many to choose from in various different niches, so we want to match the right blog to the right guest writer.

We all know for a fact that guest blogging can generate some extra well needed revenue, you only have to speak to our co-editor Jared Thompson on the pro’s and con’s of guest writing. So not only do we want to connect writers with blogs, we also want to help make some money!

We want to create a large directory of blogs currently looking for active guest contributions with them being categorized accordingly to what niche they fall under. We don’t all like to write about design trends and put together showcases!


Posted by Daniel in Community News on October 16th
http://nenuno.co.uk/creative/community-news/writing-juices-connecting-guest-writers-with-blogging-communities/

writing-juices

Writing Juices is an upcoming platform being masterminded by Nenuno Creative and Design Juices where are aim is to connect guest writers with established blogging communities.

It is something we have been thinking about a lot recently and now we have the resources to put our ideas into action.

Our Aim

The reason behind Writing Juices is that we know it can be a struggle to find a blog that we would like to contribute to. There are so many to choose from in various different niches, so we want to match the right blog to the right guest writer.

We all know for a fact that guest blogging can generate some extra well needed revenue, you only have to speak to our co-editor Jared Thompson on the pro’s and con’s of guest writing. So not only do we want to connect writers with blogs, we also want to help make some money!

We want to create a large directory of blogs currently looking for active guest contributions with them being categorized accordingly to what niche they fall under. We don’t all like to write about design trends and put together showcases!

writing-juices-flow

Writing Juices Flow Diagram Leer más “Writing Juices, Connecting Guest Writers With Blogging Communities”

You Already Have the Life You Want

So how do we bridge that gap? How can we turn what we think we want into what we actually get? Here are some strategies I use. Maybe a few of them will work for you:

* Focus on one thing. When I get the idea to make a big change, I usually want to do 100 things all at the same time. This never works. Focus on one thing that will improve your life and don’t move on until you’ve mastered it.

* Find a daily action. Big changes don’t always happen overnight, but what you do every day between sunrise and sunset is the most important part of ensuring it actually does happen. What’s one little thing you can do right now without waiting for anything else to get started? Ask yourself that every’ single’ day. [Más…]

* Reflect on your changes. Is this big transformation you’re after actually making you happier? Best to take a second every now and again to make sure you’re not perpetually suffering from ‘the grass is greener on the other side‘ syndrome. Make sure you’re headed the right direction.

* Change your environment. Sometimes I don’t realize just how much my surroundings affect my behavior. A routine environment perpetuates routine behavior. If you want change to come a little easier, change the scenery for a while and build a new set of behaviors to associate with it.

* Rebalance relationships. Just like your environment, the people you’re around influence how you act. Truth is, your friends don’t want you to change even if they say they do because that makes them uncomfortable. The first time I decided to be a writer, I hung around with all the same people that didn’t understand me. The second time I decided to be a writer, I started hanging around other successful writers. Which one worked?

* Eliminate barriers. Sometimes they’re mental, and sometimes they’re physical. Either way, you have to get creative to find ways around them. If you don’t have the time to do something, how can you fit it into little sessions that will add up over time? If you don’t have the money to do something, what else do you have that you can trade for what you want?

* Ask for help. We all get stuck. I do regularly. I used to have too much pride to ask for help ‚’I’d rather figure it out on my own. Now I realize that’s foolish and asking for help is a hell of a lot faster and easier. There’s no shame in being more efficient.

* Find a role model. One of the fastest ways to success is to model it. Who’s already done what you’re trying to do? What things did they do that got them there faster? What slowed them down? Model what worked, avoid what didn’t.

* Relax already! Active relaxation ‚’doing things that engage you but aren’t your main focus ‚’ can bring a lot of clarity when you’re obsessing over something. I can brainstorm all day, but it doesn’t mean I’ll come up with a good idea. Those usually creep in when I finally take a break and do something else.


(…)

http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/you-already-have-the-life-you-want/

Written by Tyler Tervooren

So how do we bridge that gap? How can we turn what we think we want into what we actually get? Here are some strategies I use. Maybe a few of them will work for you:

  • Focus on one thing. When I get the idea to make a big change, I usually want to do 100 things all at the same time. This never works. Focus on one thing that will improve your life and don’t move on until you’ve mastered it.
  • Find a daily action. Big changes don’t always happen overnight, but what you do every day between sunrise and sunset is the most important part of ensuring it actually does happen. What’s one little thing you can do right now without waiting for anything else to get started? Ask yourself that every’ single’ day. Leer más “You Already Have the Life You Want”

Online Copywriting: Make Your Website Copy Dazzle

If there’s one generalization you should make as a website writer, it’s that your visitors have short attention spans and are overly saturated with information.

If you’d rather generalize, then just think about this fact: search is the most popular function on the internet. This means most visitors to your site are looking for something in particular. If they click on your site and can’t tell whether you will provide what they are looking for, they will leave.

Internet users think of their time as precious and the internet as a never-ending trove of information. Your visitors are information scavengers with little loyalty and even less time; this means you need to tailor your writing specifically to them to get their attention.

You may be interested in the following related articles as well.

* Why SEO Doesn’t Matter Anymore and What You Should Do Instead
* How to Deal With Negative Criticism
* How to Improve Your Online Social Life?
* How to Boost Your Online Portfolio
* Are You Just a Freelancer? Or a Successful One?
* Bulletproof Email Marketing: Overview, Tips and Tools

Please feel free to join us and you are always welcome to share your thoughts even if you have more related tips that our readers may like.
Things To Remember While Writing Online
instantShift – Make Your Website Copy Dazzle

Headings

Headings should have one purpose: force your readers to stay. Most readers will happily read your headline, but a much smaller percentage will stick around. Be descriptive, compelling or interesting.
Profiles

You’re a real estate agent and you have two types of clients: buyers and sellers. You could try to weave around both objectives, selling to buyers one moment and sellers the next. Or, you could target both of them with gusto. To do the latter, you must segment your audience; persuade both types of visitor to read different copy. You could place the copy under different headings or link to where visitors should go.
Importance First

instantShift – Make Your Website Copy Dazzle

If readers want to know what your site is about as quickly as possible it makes sense to explain the most important things about your site early. Take a cue from daily newspaper’s inverted pyramid style. Newspapers give the most important information (the “who,” what,” “where,” “when,” “why” and “how”) about an event as early as possible and fan out the details in the rest of the paragraphs.

Newspaper readers want the latest news, but also want to be able to move quickly to another story if it isn’t relevant to them. For example, if there is dangerous flooding in Chicago, but if you live in California you most likely don’t care. This is why it’s important for a newspaper reporter to note where the flooding is immediately so readers who aren’t concerned can move to the next story that does pertain to them. The same applies to websites.


InstantShift - Online Copywriting: Make Your Website Copy Dazzle

If there’s one generalization you should make as a website writer, it’s that your visitors have short attention spans and are overly saturated with information.

If you’d rather generalize, then just think about this fact: search is the most popular function on the internet. This means most visitors to your site are looking for something in particular. If they click on your site and can’t tell whether you will provide what they are looking for, they will leave.

Internet users think of their time as precious and the internet as a never-ending trove of information. Your visitors are information scavengers with little loyalty and even less time; this means you need to tailor your writing specifically to them to get their attention.

You may be interested in the following related articles as well.

Please feel free to join us and you are always welcome to share your thoughts even if you have more related tips that our readers may like.

Things To Remember While Writing Online

instantShift - Make Your Website Copy Dazzle

Headings

Headings should have one purpose: force your readers to stay. Most readers will happily read your headline, but a much smaller percentage will stick around. Be descriptive, compelling or interesting.

Profiles

You’re a real estate agent and you have two types of clients: buyers and sellers. You could try to weave around both objectives, selling to buyers one moment and sellers the next. Or, you could target both of them with gusto. To do the latter, you must segment your audience; persuade both types of visitor to read different copy. You could place the copy under different headings or link to where visitors should go.

Importance First

instantShift - Make Your Website Copy Dazzle

If readers want to know what your site is about as quickly as possible it makes sense to explain the most important things about your site early. Take a cue from daily newspaper’s inverted pyramid style. Newspapers give the most important information (the “who,” what,” “where,” “when,” “why” and “how”) about an event as early as possible and fan out the details in the rest of the paragraphs.

Newspaper readers want the latest news, but also want to be able to move quickly to another story if it isn’t relevant to them. For example, if there is dangerous flooding in Chicago, but if you live in California you most likely don’t care. This is why it’s important for a newspaper reporter to note where the flooding is immediately so readers who aren’t concerned can move to the next story that does pertain to them. The same applies to websites. Leer más “Online Copywriting: Make Your Website Copy Dazzle”

David Ogilvy’s 7 Tips for Writing Copy That Sells | An advertising legend

David Ogilvy is an advertising legend.

Often described as the “Original Mad Man,” and “The Father of Advertising,” Ogilvy is known largely for his advertising work while serving as the founder of Ogilvy & Mather. In addition to building a multibillion dollar company, he also helped create hugely successful campaigns for clients such as Dove, Shell, and Rolls-Royce.

If you spend any amount of time reading or watching David, you’re sure to be inspired to write better copy, so I’d encourage you to read his book or watch some of the videos floating around the web. In the meantime though, I’d like to present you with what I believe to be the best of Ogilvy’s arsenal:


David Ogilvy

David Ogilvy is an advertising legend.

Often described as the “Original Mad Man,” and “The Father of Advertising,” Ogilvy is known largely for his advertising work while serving as the founder of Ogilvy & Mather. In addition to building a multibillion dollar company, he also helped create hugely successful campaigns for clients such as Dove, Shell, and Rolls-Royce.

If you spend any amount of time reading or watching David, you’re sure to be inspired to write better copy, so I’d encourage you to read his book or watch some of the videos floating around the web. In the meantime though, I’d like to present you with what I believe to be the best of Ogilvy’s arsenal: Leer más “David Ogilvy’s 7 Tips for Writing Copy That Sells | An advertising legend”

Why You Should Write When Life Sucks

When Ali Hale sends me a post, I know it’s going to be good. And this one – on what to do about writing when life sucks – hits the target. Feel free to let us know in the comment section what you’ve done with those “life sucks” moments and how you can use them to create emotional content that packs a punch.

This isn’t news to you: sometimes life sucks.

Maybe a bunch of things have gone wrong. Family issues. Financial hiccups. Teenage dramas. A business downturn.

Perhaps you’ve lost some of your usual energy and zest. Maybe you got too busy. Maybe you’ve had a big disappointment. Maybe you’re juggling a lot of balls at once, and you can’t let anything drop.

However it happened, you ended up here. Feeling like life sucks. Feeling tired, angry, stressed, afraid, and upset. And when you sit down to write (if you even get that far), you feel like you have nothing to say.


Written by Agent X | http://menwithpens.ca/writing-when-life-sucks

When Ali Hale sends me a post, I know it’s going to be good. And this one – on what to do about writing when life sucks – hits the target. Feel free to let us know in the comment section what you’ve done with those “life sucks” moments and how you can use them to create emotional content that packs a punch.

This isn’t news to you: sometimes life sucks.

Maybe a bunch of things have gone wrong. Family issues. Financial hiccups. Teenage dramas. A business downturn.

Perhaps you’ve lost some of your usual energy and zest. Maybe you got too busy. Maybe you’ve had a big disappointment. Maybe you’re juggling a lot of balls at once, and you can’t let anything drop.

However it happened, you ended up here. Feeling like life sucks. Feeling tired, angry, stressed, afraid, and upset. And when you sit down to write (if you even get that far), you feel like you have nothing to say.

That’s the best time to write. Leer más “Why You Should Write When Life Sucks”

The Worst Mistake a Writer Can Make

Author’s note: I wrote this post while picturing James Chartrand leaning forward, squinting into a computer, wondering when all the aches and pains would go away. As always, I swooped in to rescue someone who probably doesn’t want my help.

Editor’s note: At the moment of reading this post, I was actually sitting casually (meaning, slumped, not straight), leaning to the left with my elbow propped on the chair, my shoulders forward, and my head tilted. It doesn’t sound comfy… I swear it was.

There is no off switch to adaptation. Our bodies are pretty smart and they’re always getting better at whatever they’re doing. If we teach our bodies good habits, adaptation rewards us. If we teach our bodies bad habits, adaptation is a punisher.

This is usually bad news for writers, or anyone else who spends a lot of time typing. When was the last time you were with a bunch of writers and thought Wow, everyone has such great posture!

Nope. Our heads are usually too far forward on our necks. Our shoulders slump forward. When we stand at rest, our hands don’t fall naturally to our sides, but they rotate internally to the point where our palms face the wall behind us. Not good. We have gotten better… at getting worse.

So what does this have to do with writing?


Written by Agent X//menwithpens.ca


Author’s note: I wrote this post while picturing James Chartrand leaning forward, squinting into a computer, wondering when all the aches and pains would go away. As always, I swooped in to rescue someone who probably doesn’t want my help.

Editor’s note: At the moment of reading this post, I was actually sitting casually (meaning, slumped, not straight), leaning to the left with my elbow propped on the chair, my shoulders forward, and my head tilted. It doesn’t sound comfy… I swear it was.

There is no off switch to adaptation. Our bodies are pretty smart and they’re always getting better at whatever they’re doing. If we teach our bodies good habits, adaptation rewards us. If we teach our bodies bad habits, adaptation is a punisher.

This is usually bad news for writers, or anyone else who spends a lot of time typing. When was the last time you were with a bunch of writers and thought Wow, everyone has such great posture!

Nope. Our heads are usually too far forward on our necks. Our shoulders slump forward. When we stand at rest, our hands don’t fall naturally to our sides, but they rotate internally to the point where our palms face the wall behind us. Not good. We have gotten better… at getting worse.

So what does this have to do with writing? Leer más “The Worst Mistake a Writer Can Make”

The Job Reply I Want to Write


PG

Many of us do things that aren’t particularly healthy. Sometimes these bad habits are not only unhealthy, but completely unproductive, too. For example, my RSS mostly contains blogs and news sites I follow to keep up on the topics I write about. But in among them, for some reason, I still keep a few feeds to writing job boards. Normally, I skip over the low-paid and no-paid ones pretty quickly and move on with my day.

But lately, I’ve seen some where the requests are so egregious I feel I need the respond to the poster. But in the interest of not burning bridges, I won’t.

Instead, I present to FreelanceSwitch: The job ad reply I wish I’d write. All names have been changed to protect the annoying. Leer más “The Job Reply I Want to Write”