La regla de las 3 Ps, o el secreto mejor guardado del negocio perfecto en la nube


http://www.ingresosalcuadrado.com

Hoy voy a presentarte un concepto fundamental, si quieres montar tú también un negocio perfecto en la nube. De este concepto depende el éxito de tu proyecto, los meses o los años que vas a tardar antes de acercarte a esta meta: tener un pequeño gran negocio propio. Y además, en este caso, un negocio de futuro, innovador preparado para sobrevivir a la globalización y su presión dictatorial sobre los precios.

Si, si. De verdad.

negocio perfecto en la nube

¿Has oído hablar de la regla de las 3 P’s?

La fórmula parece extremadamente sencilla, en teoría:

  1. P. de Personas
  2. P. de Problemas
  3. P. de Productos

Pero los emprendedores, y la gente en general, solo suele pensar en sí. Pensar en tu idea, y en tu proyecto, en tus productos, en tu éxito empresarial (ya has visualizado este momento ¿verdad?). Leer más “La regla de las 3 Ps, o el secreto mejor guardado del negocio perfecto en la nube”

A C E N T O S e n C A S T E L L A N O | ***POST DESTACADO***

Acento prosódico y acento ortográfico

Acento prosódico: Es la manera en que se pronuncia una palabra. Marca, al hablar, la sílaba que suena más.

Acento ortográfico: Es un símbolo (´) que ayuda a pronunciar una palabra leída.

Siempre se coloca en la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico.

KONTUZ: la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico, no tiene obligación de llevar el ortográfico. Sólo lo llevará si es necesario para pronunciar o distinguir esa palabra.

Clasificación de palabras según su acento prosódico

Palabra aguda: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la última sílaba (p.e. amortización, arroz, son)

Todas las palabras monosílabas (de una sílaba) son, evidentemente, agudas.

Palabra llana: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la penúltima (anteúltima) sílaba (p.e. fuerte, débil, listado)

En castellano, la mayoría de las palabras polisílabas son llanas (en cambio en francés son agudas).

Palabra esdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la antepenúltima (tercera por detrás) sílaba (p.e. miércoles, sábado, cónyuge)

Palabra sobresdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico antes de la antepenúltima sílaba (p.e. dígamelo, lógicamente)


Cover of the first edition of Foundation and s...


Acento prosódico y acento ortográfico

Acento prosódico: Es la manera en que se pronuncia una palabra. Marca, al hablar, la sílaba que suena más.

Acento ortográfico: Es un símbolo (´) que ayuda a pronunciar una palabra leída.

Siempre se coloca en la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico.

KONTUZ: la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico, no tiene obligación de llevar el ortográfico. Sólo lo llevará si es necesario para pronunciar o distinguir esa palabra.

Clasificación de palabras según su acento prosódico

Palabra aguda: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la última sílaba (p.e. amortización, arroz, son)

Todas las palabras monosílabas (de una sílaba) son, evidentemente, agudas.

Palabra llana: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la penúltima (anteúltima) sílaba (p.e. fuerte, débil, listado)

En castellano, la mayoría de las palabras polisílabas son llanas (en cambio en francés son agudas).

Palabra esdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la antepenúltima (tercera por detrás) sílaba (p.e. miércoles, sábado, cónyuge)

Palabra sobresdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico antes de la antepenúltima sílaba (p.e. dígamelo, lógicamente) Leer más “A C E N T O S e n C A S T E L L A N O | ***POST DESTACADO***”

Real Men Do Apologize

This thesis was confirmed by two studies. In the first, 33 male and 33 female college students filled out an online questionnaire each evening for 12 nights. They described up to three instances that day in which “you apologized to someone or did something to someone else that might have deserved an apology.” They also described up to three incidents in which “someone else apologized to you, or did something to you that might have deserved an apology.”

As expected, the women reported offering more apologies than the men. However, they also reported committing more offenses. After taking this different threshold of perceived offensive behavior into account, “we found that the gender difference in frequency of apologies disappeared,” Schumann and Ross write. “Female and male transgressors apologized for an equal proportion of their offenses (approximately 81 percent).”


Newly published research finds men are as willing as women to apologize. But they’re less likely to believe a particular incident warrants contrition.

By Tom Jacobs | //miller-mccune.com

Men, according to conventional wisdom, are stubbornly unwilling to apologize. Countless pop psychology books have referenced this reluctance, explaining that our egos are too fragile to admit we’re wrong, or we’re oblivious to important nuances of social interaction.

Sorry to disrupt that lovely feeling of superiority, ladies, but newly published research suggests such smug explanations miss the mark. Writing in the journal Psychological Science, University of Waterloo psychologists Karina Schumann and Michael Ross report that men are, indeed, less likely to say “I’m sorry.” But they’re also less likely to take offense and expect an apology from someone else.

Their conclusion is that “men apologize less frequently than women because they have a higher threshold for what constitutes offensive behavior.” Whether on the giving or receiving end, males are less likely to feel an unpleasant incident is serious enough to warrant a statement of remorse. Leer más “Real Men Do Apologize”

The Lifestyle of an Internet Entrepreneur

Outsourcing parts of your business can be a great strategy, but one that needs careful management.

If your business chooses to outsource some of its activities, a part of your time or someone else’s will still be required to manage projects, and hire staff and/or freelancers to contribute to the business.

As a founder or co-founder of your web business, you have the important task of driving its strategic direction. You wouldn’t want your business to be completely run on auto pilot without any input from yourself.

This brings to question a related issue about what sort of lifestyle an entrepreneur has. Will you have a dreaded lifestyle that consists of working relentless long hours with little time for recreation? Or will you have a leisurely lifestyle that consists of working only a few hours a day?


Ask successful internet entrepreneurs what it takes to create a successful business online, and the majority will say that it takes a great deal of hard work and perseverance to succeed.

Earlier this year, I read Daniel Scocco’s post at Daily Blog Tips on the working methods of 12 top online entrepreneurs.

A successful online entrepreneur himself, Daniel interviewed twelve well known and successful online entrepreneurs to find out what their typical work week looked like, and what they enjoyed doing when not working.

The line up of successful online entrepreneurs included Darren Rowse, Aaron Wall, Neil Patel, Yaro Starak, Chris Garrett and Collis Ta’eed. The interviews revealed that the majority of these entrepreneurs worked over 60 hours a week, 7 days a week. One entrepreneur – Dan Schawbel – works a staggering 110 hours a week.

Being an internet entrepreneur is hard work, and Collis at Envato makes no bones about this in his course on building a blog business. Here’s a few relevant quotes from the eBook, “How to Build a Successful Blog Business”:

“So building a business out of blogging, like any business, involves investment both in time and money.”

“Like any business, it will take hard work, dedication, savvy, and a bit of luck.”

“There are bloggers making considerable amounts of money, and in fact two of the case studies in this book record how two blogs have worked their way into five and six-figures per month in revenue. However, like most things in life, it takes a lot of work.” Leer más “The Lifestyle of an Internet Entrepreneur”

Almost Genius: Women’s Prosthetic Limbs as Fashion Accessories

“Outfeet addresses amputee women who still would like to overcome the trauma and lead a colorful and sexy life,” the designer says.

The idea that prostheses should be customized for women’s bodies is a good one. Ergonomic design, from chairs to medical tools, is almost always based on a male physique, to women’s detriment; in prosthetics design — the most intimate ergonomic challenge — it’s an especially grave oversight.

But the market — and lack thereof — is the problem preventing ideas like this from becoming a reality. Oddly enough, women make up a tiny percentage of amputees, even discounting people who’ve lost limbs in combat. (Diabetes is the leading cause of lower-limb amputation in the United States, and it disproportionately affects men.) So even if designers wanted to sex up women’s prostheses, they’d have a hard time finding any one willing to cough up the R&D dollars in the first place.


We live in in the post-human world augured by William Gibson. Need proof? Look at all the freakish examples of plastic surgery on TV. Does Heidi Montag look human to you?

So why can’t prosthetic legs become the next must-have fashion accessory? Like, tonight I’ll take the Birkin bag, the Tiffany bracelet, and the sexy black pull-on leg (complete with sexy black attachable high heel).

The concept is the brainchild of Israeli industrial designer Aviya Serfaty who, noting that prostheses are almost always made for men, set out to craft a limb for women. And their love for accessorizing.

Girls in Tech Debate: A Publicity Hoax?

Last week a big debate began circling the tech community over women and entrepreneurship. Some said it was still a man’s world while others pointed the finger back at women for not having more female risk-takers. This all a few days after an article titled Is There Anything Good About Men, resurfaced the interwebs, then Michael Arrington in this article proclaimed how TechCrunch goes above and beyond to find women in tech “…we do spend an extraordinary amount of time finding those qualified women and asking them to speak.” It was also noted that half executive staff were woman. The conclusion of the article went something like: we try to find women in tech, there’s tons of money for them, female entrepreneurs just don’t exist. Several times it was mentioned how TechCrunch loves to cover women founded companies but the topic was left open “…And when you do start your company, we’ll cover it. Promise.”


Posted by Ellie Cachette

Last week a big debate began circling the tech community over women and entrepreneurship. Some said it was still a man’s world while others pointed the finger back at women for not having more female risk-takers. This all a few days after an article titled Is There Anything Good About Men, resurfaced the interwebs, then Michael Arrington in this article proclaimed how TechCrunch goes above and beyond to find women in tech “…we do spend an extraordinary amount of time finding those qualified women and asking them to speak.” It was also noted that half executive staff were woman.  The conclusion of the article went something like: we try to find women in tech, there’s tons of money for them, female entrepreneurs just don’t exist.  Several times it was mentioned how TechCrunch loves to cover women founded companies but the topic was left open “…And when you do start your company, we’ll cover it.  Promise.

Leer más “Girls in Tech Debate: A Publicity Hoax?”

Workplace Salaries: At Last, Women on Top

The fact that the average American working woman earns only about 8o% of what the average American working man earns has been something of a festering sore for at least half the population for several decades. And despite many programs and analyses and hand wringing and badges and even some legislation, the figure hasn’t budged much in the last five years.

But now there’s evidence that the ship may finally be turning around: according to a new analysis of 2,000 communities by a market research company, in 147 out of 150 of the biggest cities in the U.S., young women’s median full-time salaries are 8% higher than those of the guys in their peer group. In two cities, Atlanta and Memphis, those women are making around 20% more. This squares with earlier research from Queens College, New York, that had suggested that this was happening in major metropoles. But the new study suggests that the gap is bigger than thought, with young women in New York City, Los Angles and San Diego making 17%, 12% and 15% more than their male peers respectively. And it also holds true even in reasonably small cities like Raleigh Durham, N.C., Charlotte, N.C., (both 14% more) and Jacksonville, Florida (6%). (See TIME’s special report on the state of the American woman.)


The fact that the average American working woman earns only about 8o% of what the average American working man earns has been something of a festering sore for at least half the population for several decades. And despite many programs and analyses and hand wringing and badges and even some legislation, the figure hasn’t budged much in the last five years.

But now there’s evidence that the ship may finally be turning around: according to a new analysis of 2,000 communities by a market research company, in 147 out of 150 of the biggest cities in the U.S., young women’s median full-time salaries are 8% higher than those of the guys in their peer group. In two cities, Atlanta and Memphis, those women are making around 20% more. This squares with earlier research from Queens College, New York, that had suggested that this was happening in major metropoles. But the new study suggests that the gap is bigger than thought, with young women in New York City, Los Angles and San Diego making 17%, 12% and 15% more than their male peers respectively. And it also holds true even in reasonably small cities like Raleigh Durham, N.C., Charlotte, N.C., (both 14% more) and Jacksonville, Florida (6%). (See TIME’s special report on the state of the American woman.) Leer más “Workplace Salaries: At Last, Women on Top”

Magazine Website Review

MORE magazine. In that one simple word it uses as its title, it promises a lot. Does the magazine’s website deliver? Let’s take a look.

Strength of Content: 10
Regarding content, there is hardly a stone left unturned at MORE.com. As the navigation tabs say, Fashion, Beauty, Health, Sex & Love, Money & Careers, MORE Women, Passions and Community—it’s all covered “For Women of Style & Substance.”

Within each category are how-tos, trends, reviews, strategies, forums and straight-up articles ranging from “Why Marriages Fall Apart” to “9 Green Social Entrepreneur Start-Ups” to “Life Lesson Learned Too Late.” There is a lot here for the woman who’s matured out of Glamour and Cosmo and now feels more motivated to make life work for her.

MORE’s major theme is reinvention—and the site is full of inspiration. While there’s a wide range of articles to guide you in buying the right cosmetics, clothing, libido foods or investment tools, MORE concentrates equally on the larger ideas of reinventing yourself (see: Reinvention Institute), of starting over (see: Second Acts and My First After 40) and of getting in touch with your passions (see: One Amazing Thing).

MORE.com is pleasantly interactive. You can join the MORE community for free, create a profile, network with other women and write stories that are posted on the site.


MORE magazine’s website

MORE magazine. In that one simple word it uses as its title, it promises a lot. Does the magazine’s website deliver? Let’s take a look.

Strength of Content: 10
Regarding content, there is hardly a stone left unturned at MORE.com. As the navigation tabs say, Fashion, Beauty, Health, Sex & Love, Money & Careers, MORE Women, Passions and Community—it’s all covered “For Women of Style & Substance.”

Within each category are how-tos, trends, reviews, strategies, forums and straight-up articles ranging from “Why Marriages Fall Apart” to “9 Green Social Entrepreneur Start-Ups” to “Life Lesson Learned Too Late.” There is a lot here for the woman who’s matured out of Glamour and Cosmo and now feels more motivated to make life work for her.

MORE‘s major theme is reinvention—and the site is full of inspiration. While there’s a wide range of articles to guide you in buying the right cosmetics, clothing, libido foods or investment tools, MORE concentrates equally on the larger ideas of reinventing yourself (see: Reinvention Institute), of starting over (see: Second Acts and My First After 40) and of getting in touch with your passions (see: One Amazing Thing).

MORE.com is pleasantly interactive. You can join the MORE community for free, create a profile, network with other women and write stories that are posted on the site. Leer más “Magazine Website Review”

Marketing To Women: Focus On Relationships

“I’m a woman. I think, feel and see differently. How well do you think you really know me?

There are few smart guys (even experienced husbands) who wouldn’t welcome these words of wisdom when jammed up in a “what did I do now?” situation. Of course, truly knowing and understanding women doesn’t just apply to relationships. (I know I’m on thin ice writing this – but I am trying to make a broader point, so please hang in there with me).

Women are the primary purchase decision-makers in most American households. According to one study, women make up the majority of all consumer purchases — clothes, computers, new homes, vacations, healthcare, food, etc. It was found that although both partners work in a particular household, it’s the women that direct how 80% of the combined income gets spent!

So what does this mean for marketers, especially those of the male kind? (and by the way, this includes women marketers – because so much of the profession has been historically documented by men)


“I’m a woman. I think, feel and see differently. How well do you think you really know me?

There are few smart guys (even experienced husbands) who wouldn’t welcome these words of wisdom when jammed up in a “what did I do now?” situation. Of course, truly knowing and understanding women doesn’t just apply to relationships. (I know I’m on thin ice writing this – but I am trying to make a broader point, so please hang in there with me).

Women are the primary purchase decision-makers in most American households. According to one study, women make up the majority of all consumer purchases — clothes, computers, new homes, vacations, healthcare, food, etc. It was found that although both partners work in a particular household, it’s the women that direct how 80% of the combined income gets spent!

So what does this mean for marketers, especially those of the male kind? (and by the way, this includes women marketers – because so much of the profession has been historically documented by men) Leer más “Marketing To Women: Focus On Relationships”

6 Steps for Women Who Deserve a Raise

Although I’ve consulted to numerous female execs over the years, a dozen or so years ago, one client from among the top paid executives in America was especially instructive about the issue of male consultants working for female execs. I asked her why she wanted to work with a man. Her response? “The image of me working with a male consultant has much more cachet than working with a woman.” I hope that by now that has changed. Of course, she tossed me a bone: “Besides, you’re more knowledgable than any women I know in the consulting business.”


One of the continuing inequities in the American workforce is the paygap between women and men.  Even though women, on average, tend to be better educated than men, those women who work full time only earn about 77 cents for every dollar a man makes.

FYI: To my amusement I’ve learned that a few women get frustrated by a man writing about this, but I have plenty of reasons, not least, three daughters and a wife, who are professionals.  At different times in their marriage all four made more than their husbands.  (Furthermore, it’s important to take truth wherever you can get it.) Leer más “6 Steps for Women Who Deserve a Raise”

7 Behaviors That Keep Women From Getting Ahead

On numerous occasions over the years, I’ve coached women managers and execs. Recently, while going through my file on influence management, I stumbled on an old article by Mary Ellen Drummond entitled, Seven Things We Do That Keep Us From Getting Ahead, from a now defunct (?) magazine called Women Managers. Although these recommendations don’t apply to a few female execs that I’ve worked with, they certainly apply to a large number. [Más…]

Drummond doesn’t mention the basis for her conclusions, but because of my studies in nonverbal research I’m well aware that a number of the recommendations have a research basis. This information seems to go in cycles in business circles, but I’ve seen a number of recent articles on personal presentation. I’m also aware that the top business schools, including Booth, Kellogg, Harvard and Stanford give time in their program for personal presentation, usually in leadership development programs that focus on interpersonal communication.


On numerous occasions over the years, I’ve coached women managers and execs.  Recently, while going through my file on influence management, I stumbled on an old article by Mary Ellen Drummond entitled, Seven Things We Do That Keep Us From Getting Ahead, from a now defunct (?) magazine called Women Managers.  Although these recommendations don’t apply to a few female execs that I’ve worked with, they certainly apply to a large number.   Leer más “7 Behaviors That Keep Women From Getting Ahead”

Are Size 16 Supermodels a Step Too Far?


By jeremywaite

“When you’ve got charm, size doesn’t matter”. Crystal Renn

Vogue’s model of the moment, size 16 super model Crystal Renn, is spearheading the launch the new Italian on-line magazine, Vogue Curvy.  Initially I was fascinated and excited about the launch of their brave new venture, but the more I think about it, the more I think we are being sold half a story without seeing the full picture.

Personally, I find curves much more attractive than stick thin super models.  I recently wrote about Kate Moss, but because of her talent and longevity, not because of her shape.  I’ve never been a fan of heroin-chic, so I’m as guilty as anyone of celebrating ‘real women’ on the covers of fashion magazines or in advertising campaigns, but I also seem to have missed the ‘real story’.

Size 16 ‘Supermodel’ Crystal Renn

“As a size 16 model, Crystal Renn is over-weight.  It’s easy to get caught up in the ’size zero argument’, but the UK has a much bigger problem with obesity and over-eating than it does with anorexia.  It is far more important for the media to promote healthy models”. (Jessica Lovell, Nutritional Therapist & Wellness Coach) Leer más “Are Size 16 Supermodels a Step Too Far?”

Women’s careers take backseat to men’s


Businesswoman

Women might be on a more even footing at work but at home their careers tend to take a backseat to their husband’s job with women most likely to quit when both are working long hours, according to a US study.

Researcher Youngjoo Cha, from Cornell University, found that working women with a husband who worked 50 hours or more a week found themselves still doing most of the housework and the care giving and were more likely to end up quitting their job.

An analysis of 8484 professional workers and 17,648 nonprofessionals from dual-earner families showed that if women had a husband who worked 60 hours or more per week it increased the woman’s odds of quitting her paid job by 42 per cent.

Cha said the odds of quitting increased to 51 per cent for professional women whose husbands work 60 hours or more per week, and for professional mothers the odds they would quit their jobs jumped 112 per cent.

However, it did not significantly affect a man’s odds of quitting his job if his wife worked 60 hours or more per week, according to the study published in the American Sociological Review in April.

For professional men, both parents and non-parents, the effects of a wife working long hours were negligible, according to the study called Reinforcing Separate Spheres: The Effect of Spousal Overwork on Men’s and Women’s Employment in Dual-Earner Households.

“As long work-hours introduce conflict between work and family into many dual-earner families, couples often resolve conflict in ways that prioritise husbands’ careers,” Cha, who used data from the U.S. Census Bureau, said in a statement.

“This effect is magnified among workers in professional and managerial occupations, where the norm of overwork and the culture of intensive parenting tend to be strongest. The findings suggest that the prevalence of overwork may lead many dual-earner couples to return to a separate spheres arrangement – breadwinning men and homemaking women.”

Reuters
http://www.smh.com.au/executive-style/executive-women/womens-careers-take-backseat-to-mens-20100405-rmjx.html

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