La regla de las 3 Ps, o el secreto mejor guardado del negocio perfecto en la nube


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Hoy voy a presentarte un concepto fundamental, si quieres montar tú también un negocio perfecto en la nube. De este concepto depende el éxito de tu proyecto, los meses o los años que vas a tardar antes de acercarte a esta meta: tener un pequeño gran negocio propio. Y además, en este caso, un negocio de futuro, innovador preparado para sobrevivir a la globalización y su presión dictatorial sobre los precios.

Si, si. De verdad.

negocio perfecto en la nube

¿Has oído hablar de la regla de las 3 P’s?

La fórmula parece extremadamente sencilla, en teoría:

  1. P. de Personas
  2. P. de Problemas
  3. P. de Productos

Pero los emprendedores, y la gente en general, solo suele pensar en sí. Pensar en tu idea, y en tu proyecto, en tus productos, en tu éxito empresarial (ya has visualizado este momento ¿verdad?). Leer más “La regla de las 3 Ps, o el secreto mejor guardado del negocio perfecto en la nube”

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A C E N T O S e n C A S T E L L A N O | ***POST DESTACADO***

Acento prosódico y acento ortográfico

Acento prosódico: Es la manera en que se pronuncia una palabra. Marca, al hablar, la sílaba que suena más.

Acento ortográfico: Es un símbolo (´) que ayuda a pronunciar una palabra leída.

Siempre se coloca en la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico.

KONTUZ: la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico, no tiene obligación de llevar el ortográfico. Sólo lo llevará si es necesario para pronunciar o distinguir esa palabra.

Clasificación de palabras según su acento prosódico

Palabra aguda: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la última sílaba (p.e. amortización, arroz, son)

Todas las palabras monosílabas (de una sílaba) son, evidentemente, agudas.

Palabra llana: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la penúltima (anteúltima) sílaba (p.e. fuerte, débil, listado)

En castellano, la mayoría de las palabras polisílabas son llanas (en cambio en francés son agudas).

Palabra esdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la antepenúltima (tercera por detrás) sílaba (p.e. miércoles, sábado, cónyuge)

Palabra sobresdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico antes de la antepenúltima sílaba (p.e. dígamelo, lógicamente)


Cover of the first edition of Foundation and s...


Acento prosódico y acento ortográfico

Acento prosódico: Es la manera en que se pronuncia una palabra. Marca, al hablar, la sílaba que suena más.

Acento ortográfico: Es un símbolo (´) que ayuda a pronunciar una palabra leída.

Siempre se coloca en la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico.

KONTUZ: la sílaba que lleva el acento prosódico, no tiene obligación de llevar el ortográfico. Sólo lo llevará si es necesario para pronunciar o distinguir esa palabra.

Clasificación de palabras según su acento prosódico

Palabra aguda: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la última sílaba (p.e. amortización, arroz, son)

Todas las palabras monosílabas (de una sílaba) son, evidentemente, agudas.

Palabra llana: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la penúltima (anteúltima) sílaba (p.e. fuerte, débil, listado)

En castellano, la mayoría de las palabras polisílabas son llanas (en cambio en francés son agudas).

Palabra esdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico en la antepenúltima (tercera por detrás) sílaba (p.e. miércoles, sábado, cónyuge)

Palabra sobresdrújula: La que lleva su acento prosódico antes de la antepenúltima sílaba (p.e. dígamelo, lógicamente) Leer más “A C E N T O S e n C A S T E L L A N O | ***POST DESTACADO***”

Real Men Do Apologize

This thesis was confirmed by two studies. In the first, 33 male and 33 female college students filled out an online questionnaire each evening for 12 nights. They described up to three instances that day in which “you apologized to someone or did something to someone else that might have deserved an apology.” They also described up to three incidents in which “someone else apologized to you, or did something to you that might have deserved an apology.”

As expected, the women reported offering more apologies than the men. However, they also reported committing more offenses. After taking this different threshold of perceived offensive behavior into account, “we found that the gender difference in frequency of apologies disappeared,” Schumann and Ross write. “Female and male transgressors apologized for an equal proportion of their offenses (approximately 81 percent).”


Newly published research finds men are as willing as women to apologize. But they’re less likely to believe a particular incident warrants contrition.

By Tom Jacobs | //miller-mccune.com

Men, according to conventional wisdom, are stubbornly unwilling to apologize. Countless pop psychology books have referenced this reluctance, explaining that our egos are too fragile to admit we’re wrong, or we’re oblivious to important nuances of social interaction.

Sorry to disrupt that lovely feeling of superiority, ladies, but newly published research suggests such smug explanations miss the mark. Writing in the journal Psychological Science, University of Waterloo psychologists Karina Schumann and Michael Ross report that men are, indeed, less likely to say “I’m sorry.” But they’re also less likely to take offense and expect an apology from someone else.

Their conclusion is that “men apologize less frequently than women because they have a higher threshold for what constitutes offensive behavior.” Whether on the giving or receiving end, males are less likely to feel an unpleasant incident is serious enough to warrant a statement of remorse. Leer más “Real Men Do Apologize”

The Lifestyle of an Internet Entrepreneur

Outsourcing parts of your business can be a great strategy, but one that needs careful management.

If your business chooses to outsource some of its activities, a part of your time or someone else’s will still be required to manage projects, and hire staff and/or freelancers to contribute to the business.

As a founder or co-founder of your web business, you have the important task of driving its strategic direction. You wouldn’t want your business to be completely run on auto pilot without any input from yourself.

This brings to question a related issue about what sort of lifestyle an entrepreneur has. Will you have a dreaded lifestyle that consists of working relentless long hours with little time for recreation? Or will you have a leisurely lifestyle that consists of working only a few hours a day?


Ask successful internet entrepreneurs what it takes to create a successful business online, and the majority will say that it takes a great deal of hard work and perseverance to succeed.

Earlier this year, I read Daniel Scocco’s post at Daily Blog Tips on the working methods of 12 top online entrepreneurs.

A successful online entrepreneur himself, Daniel interviewed twelve well known and successful online entrepreneurs to find out what their typical work week looked like, and what they enjoyed doing when not working.

The line up of successful online entrepreneurs included Darren Rowse, Aaron Wall, Neil Patel, Yaro Starak, Chris Garrett and Collis Ta’eed. The interviews revealed that the majority of these entrepreneurs worked over 60 hours a week, 7 days a week. One entrepreneur – Dan Schawbel – works a staggering 110 hours a week.

Being an internet entrepreneur is hard work, and Collis at Envato makes no bones about this in his course on building a blog business. Here’s a few relevant quotes from the eBook, “How to Build a Successful Blog Business”:

“So building a business out of blogging, like any business, involves investment both in time and money.”

“Like any business, it will take hard work, dedication, savvy, and a bit of luck.”

“There are bloggers making considerable amounts of money, and in fact two of the case studies in this book record how two blogs have worked their way into five and six-figures per month in revenue. However, like most things in life, it takes a lot of work.” Leer más “The Lifestyle of an Internet Entrepreneur”

Almost Genius: Women’s Prosthetic Limbs as Fashion Accessories

“Outfeet addresses amputee women who still would like to overcome the trauma and lead a colorful and sexy life,” the designer says.

The idea that prostheses should be customized for women’s bodies is a good one. Ergonomic design, from chairs to medical tools, is almost always based on a male physique, to women’s detriment; in prosthetics design — the most intimate ergonomic challenge — it’s an especially grave oversight.

But the market — and lack thereof — is the problem preventing ideas like this from becoming a reality. Oddly enough, women make up a tiny percentage of amputees, even discounting people who’ve lost limbs in combat. (Diabetes is the leading cause of lower-limb amputation in the United States, and it disproportionately affects men.) So even if designers wanted to sex up women’s prostheses, they’d have a hard time finding any one willing to cough up the R&D dollars in the first place.


We live in in the post-human world augured by William Gibson. Need proof? Look at all the freakish examples of plastic surgery on TV. Does Heidi Montag look human to you?

So why can’t prosthetic legs become the next must-have fashion accessory? Like, tonight I’ll take the Birkin bag, the Tiffany bracelet, and the sexy black pull-on leg (complete with sexy black attachable high heel).

The concept is the brainchild of Israeli industrial designer Aviya Serfaty who, noting that prostheses are almost always made for men, set out to craft a limb for women. And their love for accessorizing.

Girls in Tech Debate: A Publicity Hoax?

Last week a big debate began circling the tech community over women and entrepreneurship. Some said it was still a man’s world while others pointed the finger back at women for not having more female risk-takers. This all a few days after an article titled Is There Anything Good About Men, resurfaced the interwebs, then Michael Arrington in this article proclaimed how TechCrunch goes above and beyond to find women in tech “…we do spend an extraordinary amount of time finding those qualified women and asking them to speak.” It was also noted that half executive staff were woman. The conclusion of the article went something like: we try to find women in tech, there’s tons of money for them, female entrepreneurs just don’t exist. Several times it was mentioned how TechCrunch loves to cover women founded companies but the topic was left open “…And when you do start your company, we’ll cover it. Promise.”


Posted by Ellie Cachette

Last week a big debate began circling the tech community over women and entrepreneurship. Some said it was still a man’s world while others pointed the finger back at women for not having more female risk-takers. This all a few days after an article titled Is There Anything Good About Men, resurfaced the interwebs, then Michael Arrington in this article proclaimed how TechCrunch goes above and beyond to find women in tech “…we do spend an extraordinary amount of time finding those qualified women and asking them to speak.” It was also noted that half executive staff were woman.  The conclusion of the article went something like: we try to find women in tech, there’s tons of money for them, female entrepreneurs just don’t exist.  Several times it was mentioned how TechCrunch loves to cover women founded companies but the topic was left open “…And when you do start your company, we’ll cover it.  Promise.

Leer más “Girls in Tech Debate: A Publicity Hoax?”

Workplace Salaries: At Last, Women on Top

The fact that the average American working woman earns only about 8o% of what the average American working man earns has been something of a festering sore for at least half the population for several decades. And despite many programs and analyses and hand wringing and badges and even some legislation, the figure hasn’t budged much in the last five years.

But now there’s evidence that the ship may finally be turning around: according to a new analysis of 2,000 communities by a market research company, in 147 out of 150 of the biggest cities in the U.S., young women’s median full-time salaries are 8% higher than those of the guys in their peer group. In two cities, Atlanta and Memphis, those women are making around 20% more. This squares with earlier research from Queens College, New York, that had suggested that this was happening in major metropoles. But the new study suggests that the gap is bigger than thought, with young women in New York City, Los Angles and San Diego making 17%, 12% and 15% more than their male peers respectively. And it also holds true even in reasonably small cities like Raleigh Durham, N.C., Charlotte, N.C., (both 14% more) and Jacksonville, Florida (6%). (See TIME’s special report on the state of the American woman.)


The fact that the average American working woman earns only about 8o% of what the average American working man earns has been something of a festering sore for at least half the population for several decades. And despite many programs and analyses and hand wringing and badges and even some legislation, the figure hasn’t budged much in the last five years.

But now there’s evidence that the ship may finally be turning around: according to a new analysis of 2,000 communities by a market research company, in 147 out of 150 of the biggest cities in the U.S., young women’s median full-time salaries are 8% higher than those of the guys in their peer group. In two cities, Atlanta and Memphis, those women are making around 20% more. This squares with earlier research from Queens College, New York, that had suggested that this was happening in major metropoles. But the new study suggests that the gap is bigger than thought, with young women in New York City, Los Angles and San Diego making 17%, 12% and 15% more than their male peers respectively. And it also holds true even in reasonably small cities like Raleigh Durham, N.C., Charlotte, N.C., (both 14% more) and Jacksonville, Florida (6%). (See TIME’s special report on the state of the American woman.) Leer más “Workplace Salaries: At Last, Women on Top”