The Jeff Bezos School of Long-Term Thinking


Vía 99u.com

Why focus 10,000 years into the future? The answer lies in Bezos’ letter to Amazon shareholders from 1997 when the company went public, a manifesto of sorts about the benefits and approaches to long term thinking.

The 1997 letter’s main point: we can’t realize our potential as people or as companies unless we plan for the long term. Every subsequent year Bezos has ended shareholder letters by attaching the original 1997 essay with a reminder of the importance of thinking long term. And every year, he is proven right.

The company that started out as a few guys in a garage has now revolutionized the way we buy everything from books to toys to clothes. Amazon is now one of the 100-largest companies in America, mostly thanks to bold long term plays like the Amazon Kindle.

“If everything you do needs to work on a three-year time horizon, then you’re competing against a lot of people,” Bezos told Wired in 2011. “But if you’re willing to invest on a seven-year time horizon, you’re now competing against a fraction of those people, because very few companies are willing to do that.”

We can’t realize our potential as people or as companies unless we plan for the long term. Leer más “The Jeff Bezos School of Long-Term Thinking”

Questions No One Knows the Answers to (Full Version) – Chris Anderson


TEDEducation

In the first of a new TED-Ed series designed to catalyze curiosity, TED Curator Chris Anderson shares his boyhood obsession with quirky questions that seem to have no answers.

“Questions No One Knows the Answers to” was animated by Andrew Park (http://www.cognitivemedia.co.uk)

View the full lessons:
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/questions-no-one-knows-the-answers-to
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-many-universes-are-there
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-can-t-we-see-evidence-of-alien-life

Print is Dead? Nah, It’s Just a Start-Up

In 2010, it seemed everyone was eager to declare that print was finally dead, even before a proper funeral. The economic recession shed light on the outrageous cost of production (printing the New York Times costs twice as much as sending every subscriber a free Kindle) and led to threats of pay walls as solutions to covet content. Meanwhile, both the industry and icons of web journalism speculated about whether or not the iPad would be able to save our favorite magazines from vanishing entirely. And all this because of the Internet, where you don’t just look for news but the news is able to find you with the aid of real-time social sharing tools courtesy of powerful social networks. Curator Lauren Cornell focuses on the implications of these shifting flows of data in her new exhibit Free at the New Museum in New York. In a statement about the exhibit, Cornell comments on the power behind our growing digital culture “The internet is not just a medium, but also a territory populated and fought over by individuals, corporations, and governments; a communications tool; and a cultural catalyst.”


In 2010, it seemed everyone was eager to declare that print was finally dead, even before a proper funeral.  The economic recession shed light on the outrageous cost of production (printing the New York Times costs twice as much as sending every subscriber a free Kindle) and led to threats of pay walls as solutions to covet content.   Meanwhile, both the industry and icons of web journalism speculated about whether or not the iPad would be able to save our favorite magazines from vanishing entirely.  And all this because of the Internet, where you don’t just look for news but the news is able to find you with the aid of real-time social sharing tools courtesy of powerful social networks.  Curator Lauren Cornell focuses on the implications of these shifting flows of data in her new exhibit Free at the New Museum in New York. In a statement about the exhibit, Cornell comments on the power behind our growing digital culture “The internet is not just a medium, but also a territory populated and fought over by individuals, corporations, and governments; a communications tool; and a cultural catalyst.” Leer más “Print is Dead? Nah, It’s Just a Start-Up”

Infographic of the Day: The Blistering Rise of iPad and Tablet Computing

Keep in mind, a few early reviewers panned the iPad, saying they couldn’t understand what you’d use it for. (Never mind that these people tended to miss the point of a new paradigm in relaxed, “lean-back” computing.)

But what might be the most insightful points on the infographic are at the end. The gaming industry probably stands to be rocked the hardest by tablets, since they relegate most handheld gaming systems to the trash heap. But device makers who jump on the tablet bandwagon will probably be wracked at how cannibalistic the sales of tablets are — after all, you buy a tablet instead of a netbook, which means that players such as Dell won’t be able to catch Apple simply by entering iPad’s market.


http://www.fastcodesign.com/1662689/infographic-of-the-day-the-blistering-rise-of-ipad-and-tablet-computing 

Is iPad an iFad?  Think again.

If you’re not much of a tech nerd, you’d be forgiven for thinking the iPad and the ensuing tablet boom are merely some kind of hype machine. You’d also be wrong, if industry analysts are right. Long story short, 2010 was just the barest tip of the tablet onslaught. In two years time, they’ll be more numerous than mosquitos in July, as this infographic lays out.

The data below, produced by Morgan Stanley and Forrester, among others, and then laid out by Focus, presents hockey-stick growth scenarios for iPad and its ilk. What’s probably most surprising is how mainstream their appeal is — a whopping 14% of online shoppers say they plan to purchase an iPad in the next five months; total sales are expected to rise 1000% by 2014.

 

Leer más “Infographic of the Day: The Blistering Rise of iPad and Tablet Computing”

Innovation posts of the week: Organizational Innovation


http://www.game-changer.net/2010/10/03/innovation-posts-of-the-week-organizational-innovation/

Related articles by ZemantaLeer más “Innovation posts of the week: Organizational Innovation”

Is the Web Dying? It Doesn’t Look That Way

ired The chart accompanying the Wired article shows Web traffic shrinking — as a proportion of total Internet traffic.

Wired graphic

Is the Web dead?

Chris Anderson, Wired magazine’s editor in chief, says the Web is being crippled by a world of apps and screens in a cover story titled “The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet.”

Mr. Anderson argues that a world of downloadable apps, which work through the Internet and arrive through gadgets like the iPhone or Xbox, are quickly cannibalizing the World Wide Web as consumers prefer buttoned-up, dedicated platforms, designed specifically for mobile screens.

Is he right? Should we plaster R.I.P. signs all over the Web? Not exactly.


By NICK BILTON

Wired The chart accompanying the Wired article shows Web traffic shrinking — as a proportion of total Internet traffic.

Wired graphic

Is the Web dead?

Chris Anderson, Wired magazine’s editor in chief, says the Web is being crippled by a world of apps and screens in a cover story titled “The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet.”

Mr. Anderson argues that a world of downloadable apps, which work through the Internet and arrive through gadgets like the iPhone or Xbox, are quickly cannibalizing the World Wide Web as consumers prefer buttoned-up, dedicated platforms, designed specifically for mobile screens.

Is he right? Should we plaster R.I.P. signs all over the Web? Not exactly. Leer más “Is the Web Dying? It Doesn’t Look That Way”

Set Your Future Free

As the global economic crisis forces businesses to operate leaner, competition continues to accelerate at lightning speed. Simultaneously, consumers are clampingdown on discretionary spending and demanding more value and options in the purchases they make. Innovation management—or finding and realizing new sources of value—is key to helping businesses keep up with this constantly changing economic and competitive landscape.

A transformation that began quietly at leading-edge organizations promises to revolutionize the way companies develop and realize the benefits of innovation as a corporate competency. This transformation—using collaborative, Web-based technology to reach the “Long Tail” of innovation across and beyond an organization—not only changes the way businesses innovate, but also recasts IT from a supporting role to a strategic one.


Streptocitta albicollis (White-necked Myna)
Image via Wikipedia

As the global economic crisis forces businesses to operate leaner, competition continues to accelerate at lightning speed. Simultaneously, consumers are clampingdown on discretionary spending and demanding more value and options in the purchases they make. Innovation management—or finding and realizing new sources of value—is key to helping businesses keep up with this constantly changing economic and competitive landscape.

A transformation that began quietly at leading-edge organizations promises to revolutionize the way companies develop and realize the benefits of innovation as a corporate competency. This transformation—using collaborative, Web-based technology to reach the “Long Tail” of innovation across and beyond an organization—not only changes the way businesses innovate, but also recasts IT from a supporting role to a strategic one. Leer más “Set Your Future Free”