Le Dimmer Dims Everything On Desktop Except The Window In Focus – thnxz @addtips


Le Dimmer is a tiny application for Windows that’s designed for a single purpose only: it automatically dims everything on the desktop, including wallpaper, icons, folders, open windows, apps etc. leaving behind the foreground window and the task bar brightly lit. It has no GUI and no complex settings to confuse you. The application can come handy if you watch a lot of movies without going full screen and wanted a way to dim everything other than your media player window. It can also prove to be very useful if you have multiple windows opened and you want to focus only on one window at a time without maximizing it to take the whole of your screen real estate. Lets find out how it works.

Vía http://www.addictivetips.com/

Le-Dimmer_System-Tray

While the application appears to just sits in the system tray area without any GUI, it still lets you control the level of dimming via a command-line switch. The readme files states that the default value is 150, but you can set a number between 0 to 255 depending on how much dimming you want. You can input a greater number to darken the screen further, while conversely choosing a number lower than 150 will reduce the dimming effect.

Full article 🙂

If you want to close the application to halt the dimming, you can simply select Quit from the context menu that appears when you right-click Le Dimmer’s system tray icon. Alternatively, you can use the Ctrl+Shift+Q hotkey to exit the app.

Le-Dimmer

All in all, it’s a very simple and straightforward application that’s built to serve one purpose, perfectly does the job it’s made for. Anyone looking for a way to keep focusing on one window without getting distracted by others is bound to find it useful. It works on Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8. Both 32-bit and 64-bit OS editions are supported.

Download Le Dimmer

Windows 8 Review – Complete Guide To New Features


 

Windows-8-AddictiveTips-Review

Whenever Microsoft rotates the generation wheel of their operating system to rejuvenate it with latest enhancements, it takes some time to get accustomed to the newest member of the family. Just three years back Microsoft launched Windows 7, which to many, was deemed as the best Windows to date. Features like Libraries, Jump List, Aero Snap and Aero Glass gained instant popularity. And to be honest, it was what Vista should have been in the first place. However, time has finally arrived for Windows 8 to takeover its predecessor’s job. A job that doesn’t seem any easier this time around, as Microsoft has tried to make this latest version a desktop/tablet hybrid. Windows 8 brings a slew of changes to the table, in terms of OS usage experience as well as user interface, with all new Start Screen, Modern UI (Windows Store) apps, Tablet support, revamped Windows Explorer and what not. In short, the new OS is full of surprises. Let’s find out whether Windows 8 really deserves a place in our life or not.

Complete history

 

Increase Your PC’s RAM Speed Using Usb Drive


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano the name of the game

Tired of your slow old Computer ? But Now After Reading This Story You People Surely Gonna Make Your Computer Faster In Performance.

Don’t blame ur poor PC if it has little RAM . It’s not hard to turn an extra USB stick lying around that’s collecting dust into extra memory for your computer, allowing it to run speedier and manage more applications better.

Upgrad your computer’s RAM can be a little costly . Windows Vista introduced a useful new feature called ReadyBoost.

ReadyBoost has a unique ability to transform ordinary flash based memory into newfound memory for your computer.

These days, USB flash drives are cheap and easy to find, giving you the perfect opportunity to upgrade your memory.

Note:

This Trick Is Valid For Windows 7 or Windows Vista

Steps >>>>  Leer más “Increase Your PC’s RAM Speed Using Usb Drive”

Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft

For the first time, Internet Explorer now sports cutting-edge support for HTML5, the collection of emerging standards that permit sites to deliver slicker graphics and typography, richer interfaces that feel more like traditional software and video that doesn’t require a plug-in such as Adobe Flash. Like an eye-popping 3-D game, the software takes full advantage of your PC’s graphics hardware, enabling glitzy animation at high speeds. (See pictures of vintage computers.)

This browser is so on top of next-generation Web technologies, in fact, that it has zipped ahead of most of the Web itself. For now, the most impressive evidence of its capabilities are demos that Microsoft and its partners have ginned up. But when better sites are built, IE9 will be ready.

Not being ready for the new Web wasn’t really an option for Microsoft. Research firm Net Applications says that Internet Explorer retains 60% of the browser market, but it long ago lost the confidence and attention of most of the people who care enough about browsers to make a considered choice. (On my site, Technologizer, it’s only the third most popular browser — Firefox and Chrome are No. 1 and No. 2.) IE9 is the first version in eons that gives browser enthusiasts something to be enthusiastic about.

Still, I don’t see Internet Explorer ever again crushing the competition like it once did. Too many excellent options are just a free download away: Firefox, Chrome, Apple’s Safari (available for Windows as well as Macs) and Norwegian underdog Opera. I also like Flock, which is based on the same underpinnings as Chrome, but with built-in features relating to Facebook, Twitter and other forms of online socializing. (See the best social-networking applications.)


By Harry McCracken | //time.com

Like many of us, Microsoft does its best work when it’s running scared. Back in the mid-1990s, when Bill Gates & Co. thought that pioneering Web browser Netscape Navigator posed an existential threat to Windows, they responded by bundling their own new browser, Internet Explorer, with Windows 95. That led to the little legal kerfuffle known as United States v. Microsoft. But the truth is that Internet Explorer got so good so quickly that things would have been dicey for Netscape no matter what.

Microsoft’s share of the browser market passed 90% early in this century. With Netscape vanquished, the Internet Explorer team went into hibernation, ignoring the software until it was an embarrassing, archaic mess. Even versions 7 and 8 — released after an army of volunteer geeks resuscitated Navigator as Firefox in 2004 and began chipping away at Explorer’s monopoly — weren’t exactly scintillating. (See the 50 best websites of 2010.)

Last week, Microsoft unveiled the first beta release of Internet Explorer 9, or IE9 for short. It’s easily the most impressive browser upgrade to hail from Redmond, Wash., since the original skirmishes with Netscape. And I don’t think it’s mere coincidence that it’s the first one the company has hatched since its scariest current competitor, Google, got into the browser business by launching Chrome two years ago this month.

As beta software, IE9 is by definition a somewhat glitchy work in progress. Past Internet Explorer upgrade schedules suggest that the final version will show up sometime in 2011. If you’re curious — and not overly cautious — go ahead and download the beta here.

(One new Internet Explorer feature shuts out a sizable percentage of its potential user base: it now works only with Windows 7 and Windows Vista. Sorry, XP holdouts — Microsoft isn’t about to reward you for refusing to upgrade your nine-year-old operating system.) Leer más “Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft”

Technology’s Biggest Myths

Expensive cables are better! Defragging speeds up your PC! Refilling ink cartridges ruins your printer! We put these and nine other claims to the test to find the truth behind tech’s tallest tales.

Patrick Miller, PC World

Illustration by Keith NegleyAs it turns out, Windows Vista really wasn’t all that slow; and no, your PC probably won’t fry if you open it up without wearing a wrist strap. Thanks in large part to the Internet, the tech world is teeming with lies, half-truths, and misinformation. We’ve dug up some of the Web’s most notorious nuggets of conventional wisdom to see which hold up to scrutiny and which are merely urban legends.

Of course, there’s often a grain of truth in even the most fanciful myth. That’s why we provide a handy-dandy set of numbered warning signs to indicate how accurate each of these myths is, with 1 being True and 4 being Outrageous–a complete fabrication. After all, they say numbers never lie.
The Claim: Vista Is Slower Than Windows 7

When Windows Vista came out, it soon acquired a reputation for being slow and a resource hog. Once Windows 7 arrived, people were quick to tout it as the speedy, slim operating system that Vista should have been.

We conducted performance tests on a handful of laptops and desktops using both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Vista and Windows 7, shortly after the latter OS was released. While results varied across configurations, a few trends stood out. Windows 7 raised WorldBench 6 scores from 1.25 percent to almost 10 percent (but most often in the vicinity of 2 to 3 percent); it also resulted in much faster disk operations (in Windows 7 our Nero disc-burning software tests ran twice as fast on an IdeaPad laptop, and 2.5 times as fast on a Gateway laptop), and in slightly longer battery life (the IdeaPad lasted only an extra minute; the Gateway got an extra 15 minutes).

While Windows 7 did seem to speed things up somewhat, a few tests actually showed some slowdown. Applications launched more slowly across the board (the most dramatic change was a 2.7-second Photoshop CS4 launch in Vista turning into a 9.6-second launch in Windows 7), and the Gateway laptop saw a slight increase in startup time (39.6 seconds in Vista; 43.6 seconds in Windows 7).

As it turns out, the “snappy” feeling Windows 7 engenders has to do with Registry tweaks and minor changes to the window manager that make the OS feel more responsive, even though it isn’t that different.

The verdict: Windows 7 is faster, but not by as much as you may think.


Expensive cables are better! Defragging speeds up your PC! Refilling ink cartridges ruins your printer! We put these and nine other claims to the test to find the truth behind tech’s tallest tales.

Patrick Miller, PC World

Illustration by Keith NegleyAs it turns out, Windows Vista really wasn’t all that slow; and no, your PC probably won’t fry if you open it up without wearing a wrist strap. Thanks in large part to the Internet, the tech world is teeming with lies, half-truths, and misinformation. We’ve dug up some of the Web’s most notorious nuggets of conventional wisdom to see which hold up to scrutiny and which are merely urban legends.

Of course, there’s often a grain of truth in even the most fanciful myth. That’s why we provide a handy-dandy set of numbered warning signs to indicate how accurate each of these myths is, with 1 being True and 4 being Outrageous–a complete fabrication. After all, they say numbers never lie.

The Claim: Vista Is Slower Than Windows 7

When Windows Vista came out, it soon acquired a reputation for being slow and a resource hog. Once Windows 7 arrived, people were quick to tout it as the speedy, slim operating system that Vista should have been.

We conducted performance tests on a handful of laptops and desktops using both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Vista and Windows 7, shortly after the latter OS was released. While results varied across configurations, a few trends stood out. Windows 7 raised WorldBench 6 scores from 1.25 percent to almost 10 percent (but most often in the vicinity of 2 to 3 percent); it also resulted in much faster disk operations (in Windows 7 our Nero disc-burning software tests ran twice as fast on an IdeaPad laptop, and 2.5 times as fast on a Gateway laptop), and in slightly longer battery life (the IdeaPad lasted only an extra minute; the Gateway got an extra 15 minutes).

While Windows 7 did seem to speed things up somewhat, a few tests actually showed some slowdown. Applications launched more slowly across the board (the most dramatic change was a 2.7-second Photoshop CS4 launch in Vista turning into a 9.6-second launch in Windows 7), and the Gateway laptop saw a slight increase in startup time (39.6 seconds in Vista; 43.6 seconds in Windows 7).

As it turns out, the “snappy” feeling Windows 7 engenders has to do with Registry tweaks and minor changes to the window manager that make the OS feel more responsive, even though it isn’t that different.

The verdict: Windows 7 is faster, but not by as much as you may think. Leer más “Technology’s Biggest Myths”

A Free Utility to Backup all your Windows Drivers

When you buy a new PC, the vendor will almost always provide you with a “driver CD” that has the device drivers for all the hardware that’s inside your new machine. The CD comes handy when you are reinstalling Windows from scratch or are trying to recover your machine to its original state after, say, a system crash.

There are however two drawbacks with the driver CD.


windows hardware

When you buy a new PC, the vendor will almost always provide you with a “driver CD” that has the device drivers for all the hardware that’s inside your new machine. The CD comes handy when you are reinstalling Windows from scratch or are trying to recover your machine to its original state after, say, a system crash.

There are however two drawbacks with the driver CD. Leer más “A Free Utility to Backup all your Windows Drivers”

How to Password Protect your Files and Folders

Do you have files and folders on your computer that you absolutely don’t want anyone else to see? Or do you even carry important documents on those easy-to-misplace USB drives?

If the answer is yes, you should definitely download a copy of SafeHouse Explorer – it’s a free and incredibly easy-to-use file encryption utility that will hide all your private files from prying eyes in few easy steps. You may use the tool to password protect files that are residing on your computer’s internal hard disk or even on external USB drives.
Tutorial: Encrypt and Password Protect your Files and Folders

SafeHouse Explorer, in simple English, works something like this. It creates a hidden storage area on your disk to hold all the files that you want to protect. These files and folders are hidden from normal view and will only become visible when you enter the correct password.

Here’s a more detailed tutorial on how you can protect your files with SafeHouse Explorer.


folder passwordDo you have files and folders on your computer that you absolutely don’t want anyone else to see? Or do you even carry important documents on those easy-to-misplace USB drives?

If the answer is yes, you should definitely download a copy of SafeHouse Explorer – it’s a free and incredibly easy-to-use file encryption utility that will hide all your private files from prying eyes in few easy steps. You may use the tool to password protect files that are residing on your computer’s internal hard disk or even on external USB drives.

Tutorial: Encrypt and Password Protect your Files and Folders

SafeHouse Explorer, in simple English, works something like this. It creates a hidden storage area on your disk to hold all the files that you want to protect. These files and folders are hidden from normal view and will only become visible when you enter the correct password.

Here’s a more detailed tutorial on how you can protect your files with SafeHouse Explorer. Leer más “How to Password Protect your Files and Folders”

Windows 7 supera a Windows Vista

Autor: i.aguilar

NetMarketShare publicó que el SO de la empresa Microsoft, Windows 7 superó a Windows Vista en cuota de mercado este mes de Agosto, ocupando el segundo lugar en Sistemas Operativos más usados a nivel mundial con un 14.46% de cuota.

El Sistema Operativo Windows 7 supero a Vista

El SO más usado en el mundo hasta el momento sigue siendo el Windows XP con un 61.87% de cuota, pero a como van las cosas poco a poco Windows 7 le irá ganando terreno porque según NetMarketShare todos los SO han perdido cuota, excepto Windows 7 que va hacia arriba.

Esto es muy normal ya que Windows 7 es un SO que realmente escuchó las quejas de los usuarios del Windows Vista, y para mí en lo personal es un Sistema Operativo muy amigable, que por el momento no me ha dado ningún problema.

Creo que Windows XP es el SO de Microsoft que sigue dominando en el mundo porque mucha gente no se anima a cambiarlo porque no quieren experimentar, porque se sienten bien con el Windows XP, porque su ordenador no cumple los requisitos mínimos para el cambio (por este motivo Microsoft extendió el downgrade a Windows XP), porque tuvieron mala experiencia con el Windows Vista o simplemente porque no les importa.

La verdad es que Windows 7 a comparación con el Windows XP, tiene muchas utilidades y aplicaciones que simplifican la vida y sin contar con su DirectX 11 que hace que los gráficos de videojuegos y películas en blu-ray se vean espectaculares comparándolo con el pobre y obsoleto DirectX 9 del XP.


Autor: i.aguilar

NetMarketShare publicó que el SO de la empresa Microsoft, Windows 7 superó a Windows Vista en cuota de mercado este mes de Agosto, ocupando el segundo lugar en Sistemas Operativos más usados a nivel mundial con un 14.46% de cuota.

El Sistema Operativo Windows 7 supero a Vista

El SO más usado en el mundo hasta el momento sigue siendo el Windows XP con un 61.87% de cuota, pero a como van las cosas poco a poco Windows 7 le irá ganando terreno porque según NetMarketShare todos los SO han perdido cuota, excepto Windows 7 que va hacia arriba.

Esto es muy normal ya que Windows 7 es un SO que realmente escuchó las quejas de los usuarios del Windows Vista, y para mí en lo personal es un Sistema Operativo muy amigable, que por el momento no me ha dado ningún problema.

Creo que Windows XP es el SO de Microsoft que sigue dominando en el mundo porque mucha gente no se anima a cambiarlo porque no quieren experimentar, porque se sienten bien con el Windows XP, porque su ordenador no cumple los requisitos mínimos para el cambio (por este motivo Microsoft extendió el downgrade a Windows XP), porque tuvieron mala experiencia con el Windows Vista o simplemente porque no les importa.

La verdad es que Windows 7 a comparación con el Windows XP, tiene muchas utilidades y aplicaciones que simplifican la vida y sin contar con su DirectX 11 que hace que los gráficos de videojuegos y películas en blu-ray se vean espectaculares comparándolo con el pobre y obsoleto DirectX 9 del XP. Leer más “Windows 7 supera a Windows Vista”

Prepare for Record Patch Tuesday

By Tony Bradley, PC World

Next Tuesday Microsoft will unleash 14 new security bulletins, addressing a record-tying 34 vulnerabilities. In the wake of the out-of-band patch issued for the Windows shortcut security flaw, and with an upcoming out-of-band patch from Adobe as well–IT admins need to a plan of action for implementing the deluge of updates.

Issuing 14 security bulletins in one month is a new one, but the record of patching 34 different flaws is not so uncommon any more. This is the third or fourth time that has occurred in just the past year. Microsoft has experienced a feast or famine flow of updates with virtually no security bulletins one month, followed by a massive batch of security bulletins the next. Microsoft has also had an unusual number of out-of-band patches this year to address attacks against zero-day vulnerabilities.

Wolfgang Kandek, CTO of Qualys, provides a brief analysis of the upcoming Microsoft patches on his blog. “Including the LNK update, 9 bulletins have a rating of critical and affect all version of the Windows OS, Internet Explorer, Silverlight and Microsoft Office.”

However, Kandek goes on to clarify that “Windows 7 and 2008 R2 have a smaller number of critical vulnerabilities than Windows XP and 2003 in function of their improved security architecture, but are still affected by 2 critical vulnerabilities each.”


By Tony Bradley, PC World

Next Tuesday Microsoft will unleash 14 new security bulletins, addressing a record-tying 34 vulnerabilities. In the wake of the out-of-band patch issued for the Windows shortcut security flaw, and with an upcoming out-of-band patch from Adobe as well–IT admins need to a plan of action for implementing the deluge of updates.

Issuing 14 security bulletins in one month is a new one, but the record of patching 34 different flaws is not so uncommon any more. This is the third or fourth time that has occurred in just the past year. Microsoft has experienced a feast or famine flow of updates with virtually no security bulletins one month, followed by a massive batch of security bulletins the next. Microsoft has also had an unusual number of out-of-band patches this year to address attacks against zero-day vulnerabilities.

Wolfgang Kandek, CTO of Qualys, provides a brief analysis of the upcoming Microsoft patches on his blog. “Including the LNK update, 9 bulletins have a rating of critical and affect all version of the Windows OS, Internet Explorer, Silverlight and Microsoft Office.”

However, Kandek goes on to clarify that “Windows 7 and 2008 R2 have a smaller number of critical vulnerabilities than Windows XP and 2003 in function of their improved security architecture, but are still affected by 2 critical vulnerabilities each.” Leer más “Prepare for Record Patch Tuesday”

8 sistemas para asegurar los datos vitales de su negocio

¿Dónde residen tus datos? ¿Los cargas contigo? ¿Cómo? ¿Están más y mejor seguros en lo que algunas personas llaman “servidores”? ¿Es acaso una combinación de lo anterior? ¿Son tus datos importantes? ¿Podrías sobrevivir sin ellos?.

Sería muy cómodo no tener que transportar tus datos en ordenadores portátiles o unidades de almacenamiento, y en su lugar saber exactamente dónde se encuentra, y tener acceso a ella a cualquier hora desde cualquier lugar. Eso sucederá pronto. De hecho, algunas compañías ya disfrutan de ésta tecnología: desde simples documentos hasta bases de datos completas, correo electrónico y mucho más; existen muchos proveedores de servicios que ofrecen el mantener nuestros datos –y procesos- viviendo “En la Nube”. Esto es, Cloud-Computing, o SaaS (Software as a Service).

Algunos de nosotros aun no aceptamos esto, o nos preocupa el hecho de poder perder control sobre nuestros datos sin saber exactamente dónde residen. Tal vez, estamos tan acostumbrados a ‘palpar’ nuestra información que el simple pensamiento de no tenerla con nosotros es como de plano no tenerla en absoluto.

Así pues, en este escenario de “sentirla” nos acostumbramos a salvar nuestra información en todavía más dispositivos físicos, de forma que podamos dormir tranquilos sabiendo que nuestra data está a salvo. Hasta que llegue el día en que hagamos el cambio mental y nos convenzamos que la Nube es más segura que nuestros dispositivos portátiles, continuaremos teniendo la necesidad de ponerla a salvo. Ya sea a más dispositivos o ¡a la Nube!.


como-asegurar-los-datos-sensibles-de-la-empresa¿Dónde residen tus datos? ¿Los cargas contigo? ¿Cómo? ¿Están más y mejor seguros en lo que algunas personas llaman “servidores”? ¿Es acaso una combinación de lo anterior? ¿Son tus datos importantes? ¿Podrías sobrevivir sin ellos?.

Sería muy cómodo no tener que transportar tus datos en ordenadores portátiles o unidades de almacenamiento, y en su lugar saber exactamente dónde se encuentra, y tener acceso a ella a cualquier hora desde cualquier lugar. Eso sucederá pronto. De hecho, algunas compañías ya disfrutan de ésta tecnología: desde simples documentos hasta bases de datos completas, correo electrónico y mucho más; existen muchos proveedores de servicios  que ofrecen el mantener nuestros datos –y procesos- viviendo “En la Nube”. Esto es, Cloud-Computing, o SaaS (Software as a Service).

Algunos de nosotros aun no aceptamos esto, o nos preocupa el hecho de poder perder control sobre nuestros datos sin saber exactamente dónde residen. Tal vez, estamos tan acostumbrados a ‘palpar’ nuestra información que el simple pensamiento de no tenerla con nosotros es como de plano no tenerla en absoluto.

Así pues, en este escenario de “sentirla” nos acostumbramos a salvar nuestra información en todavía más dispositivos físicos, de forma que podamos dormir tranquilos sabiendo que nuestra data está a salvo. Hasta que llegue el día en que hagamos el cambio mental y nos convenzamos que la Nube es más segura que nuestros dispositivos portátiles, continuaremos teniendo la necesidad de ponerla a salvo. Ya sea a más dispositivos o ¡a la Nube!. Leer más “8 sistemas para asegurar los datos vitales de su negocio”

Windows 7 already more dominant than Vista

In the world of monopolistic operating systems, it certainly didn’t take long for Windows 7 to be on more computer than Microsoft’s previous, bungled platform Windows Vista.

Net Applications now reports that Windows 7 accounts for 14.5% of all operating systems on active computers, leapfrogging ahead of Vista which now stands at 14.3%.

This comes juse nine months after Windows 7 became commercially available, making it just about the quickest that any new operating system has overtaken its predecessor. If you don’t believe me, just look at Windows XP. That OS still has a 61.9% market share.

It also gives more credence to Microsoft’s statement that Windows 7 is the fastest-selling operating system ever, already making its way through 175 million sold licenses, the vast majority of which are through PC makers who now almost unanimously sell all new computers with Windows 7 installed.


Mike Luttrell

//

In the world of monopolistic operating systems, it certainly didn’t take long for Windows 7 to be on more computer than Microsoft‘s previous, bungled platform Windows Vista.

Net Applications now reports that Windows 7 accounts for 14.5% of all operating systems on active computers, leapfrogging ahead of Vista which now stands at 14.3%.

This comes juse nine months after Windows 7 became commercially available, making it just about the quickest that any new operating system has overtaken its predecessor. If you don’t believe me, just look at Windows XP. That OS still has a 61.9% market share.

It also gives more credence to Microsoft’s statement that Windows 7 is the fastest-selling operating system ever, already making its way through 175 million sold licenses, the vast majority of which are through PC makers who now almost unanimously sell all new computers with Windows 7 installed. Leer más “Windows 7 already more dominant than Vista”

A Comprehensive Guide to Windows Vista Fonts for Designers

[T]here are no bad fonts — only inappropriate ones.

— Jason Beaird

The majority of computer users became aware of Microsoft Windows Vista on January 30, 2007, when the company released the new operating system publicly.

You and I of course knew about it well beforehand. Once Vista was available for beta, many web designers adopted it early to begin trying — with varying levels of success — to figure out if they can incorporate Vista fonts into their designs.

Three things quickly became clear:

1. They are beautiful typefaces.
2. They are unusually — and, for designers, unacceptably – blurry unless you have ClearType or another anti-aliasing protocol enabled; but there are serious issues with ClearType.
3. With some exceptions, they are markedly smaller in size than most fonts, making them difficult to incorporate into font stacks.

Trust Microsoft to create something attractive and potentially valuable like this set of spiffy new fonts (or an operating system like Vista), and then take steps to ensure they can’t be used easily.

But I like these fonts: they’re beautiful and they are available in many of our user’s computers (as much as 92% of all PCs use Windows as of May 2010[1]). In addition, the design community deserves some thought as to how to use them in their work.

Let’s see what we’re up against.


by Michael Tuck

A Comprehensive Guide to Microsoft Vista Fonts for Designers

[T]here are no bad fonts — only inappropriate ones.

Jason Beaird

The majority of computer users became aware of Microsoft Windows Vista on January 30, 2007, when the company released the new operating system publicly.

You and I of course knew about it well beforehand. Once Vista was available for beta, many web designers adopted it early to begin trying — with varying levels of success — to figure out if they can incorporate Vista fonts into their designs.

Three things quickly became clear:

  1. They are beautiful typefaces.
  2. They are unusually — and, for designers, unacceptably blurry unless you have ClearType or another anti-aliasing protocol enabled; but there are serious issues with ClearType.
  3. With some exceptions, they are markedly smaller in size than most fonts, making them difficult to incorporate into font stacks.

Trust Microsoft to create something attractive and potentially valuable like this set of spiffy new fonts (or an operating system like Vista), and then take steps to ensure they can’t be used easily.

But I like these fonts: they’re beautiful and they are available in many of our user’s computers (as much as 92% of all PCs use Windows as of May 2010[1]). In addition, the design community deserves some thought as to how to use them in their work.

Let’s see what we’re up against. Leer más “A Comprehensive Guide to Windows Vista Fonts for Designers”

Teams innovation – cognitive bias and over-optimism

por jabaldaia

Why design thinking is good for innovation?

According to Tim Brown “design thinking” is to participate in a dance of four mental states :

Divergence – Is the path to innovation, not an obstacle.

Convergence – It is time to eliminate options and make choices.

Analytical – Without analytical forms of thinking would not be possible to understand complex problems.

Synthetic – is the act of extracting meaningful patterns of the totality of information collected.

These four states are not presented in a logical and predetermined sequence. Here is the intuition that is privileged.

When this dance is performed carefully consider that design can help solve many problems, however, Alan Van Pelt says people are predisposed to cognitive bias and to be led by emotions which can contribute to bad decisions.

In other words, not minimizing these cognitive biases dance is like to trod the foot of your partner.

When we are prone to the pitfalls of decision making, when uncertainty is large, this is where design thinking is more useful.

Often what looks like a useful thing becomes an auxiliary of discomfort. The automotive industry is one example as shown Jeffrey Henning by pointing to research by observation as a key to innovation.

The issues highlighted here reveal not only the need for careful observation and allows an analogy not superficial, but also clearly reveal the existence of excess optimism and its consequences.

Being over-optimistic allows innovation to happen.

The delusional optimism makes us cling to ideas more than we should.


por jabaldaia

Why design thinking is good for innovation?

According to Tim Brown “design thinking” is to participate in a dance of four mental states :

Divergence – Is the path to innovation, not an obstacle.

Convergence – It is time to eliminate options and make choices.

Analytical – Without analytical forms of thinking would not be possible to understand complex problems.

Synthetic – is the act of extracting meaningful patterns of the totality of information collected.

These four states are not presented in a logical and predetermined sequence. Here is the intuition that is privileged.

When this dance is performed carefully consider that design can help solve many problems, however, Alan Van Pelt says people are predisposed to cognitive bias and to be led by emotions which can contribute to bad decisions.

In other words, not minimizing these cognitive biases dance is like to trod the foot of your partner.

When we are prone to the pitfalls of decision making, when uncertainty is large, this is where design thinking is more useful.

Often what looks like a useful thing becomes an auxiliary of discomfort. The automotive industry is one example as shown Jeffrey Henning by pointing to research by observation as a key to innovation.

The issues highlighted here reveal not only the need for careful observation and allows an analogy not superficial, but also clearly reveal the existence of excess optimism and its consequences.

Being over-optimistic allows innovation to happen.

The delusional optimism makes us cling to ideas more than we should. Leer más “Teams innovation – cognitive bias and over-optimism”

Place Important Windows 7 Shortcuts Within Reach Of Every User

Windows 7 is relatively a new operating system. Applications are still being developed for it that explore and push its boundaries. If you are a Windows 7 user, you already appreciate its improvement over Windows Vista. But while 7 provides a great margin of user convenience, things can always be improved by third party applications. This brings to our today’s application – Preme.

Preme is a freeware program that helps place important Windows 7 shortcuts within reach of every user. There are a number of handy shortcuts provided by Preme which make 7’s usage a lot easier; for instance, you will be able to view all minimized windows in 3D style by just moving your mouse cursor to the top left corner. You can choose the view to be displayed in Flip 3D or Alt-Tab style.


Windows 7 is relatively a new operating system. Applications are still being developed for it that explore and push its boundaries. If you are a Windows 7 user, you already appreciate its improvement over Windows Vista. But while 7 provides a great margin of user convenience, things can always be improved by third party applications. This brings to our today’s application – Preme.

Preme is a freeware program that helps place important Windows 7 shortcuts within reach of every user. There are a number of handy shortcuts provided by Preme which make 7’s usage a lot easier; for instance, you will be able to view all minimized windows in 3D style by just moving your mouse cursor to the top left corner. You can choose the view to be displayed in Flip 3D or Alt-Tab style.

Preme Leer más “Place Important Windows 7 Shortcuts Within Reach Of Every User”

web design Stuck With Some Windows Error? Microsoft One Click Fix It Tool Can Detect & Repair

Windows computer users come across new situations often. Amateur computer users are completely baffled when a problem occurs; at times certain computer problems even leave the most experience computer user clueless. Calling technical support for our computers is not always helpful especially because the technician cannot see actually what our computer problem is.

Microsoft has finally recognized this extremely problematic issue and created a solution for it. The solution has been appropriately titled “Fix It.”

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Fix It is a freeware solution by Microsoft that installs into your computer. It acts as an automatic troubleshooter that contains solutions to numerous problems commonly experience by Windows Vista and Windows 7 users. The list of supported operating systems includes Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows Server (2003 + 2008).


Image representing Windows as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

Windows computer users come across new situations often. Amateur computer users are completely baffled when a problem occurs; at times certain computer problems even leave the most experience computer user clueless. Calling technical support for our computers is not always helpful especially because the technician cannot see actually what our computer problem is.

Microsoft has finally recognized this extremely problematic issue and created a solution for it. The solution has been appropriately titled “Fix It.”

Leer más “web design Stuck With Some Windows Error? Microsoft One Click Fix It Tool Can Detect & Repair”