Windows 7 mainstream support ends vía @DownloadNow by @TuongLNguyen


Windows-7On January 13, Microsoft officially ends mainstream support for Windows 7 Service Pack 1.
Regular users will still get security fixes. You can still get Windows 7 Pro licenses if you’re planning on purchasing a new system or if you’re finally upgrading from Windows XP.

  • Esto no significa que no haya más actualizaciones de seguridad ni que el sistema operativo quede abandonado.
  • Simplemente finaliza el derecho a llamar o contactar de forma online conMicrosoft para resolver problemas.

En esta ocasión, que Microsoft finalice el soporte a Windows 7, no significa que no haya más actualizaciones de seguridad ni que el sistema operativo quede abandonado.

What end of mainstream support means
For corporate users, it’s business as usual.
For home users, free online and phone support are disappearing. Microsoft stopped distributing new licenses to manufacturers and vendors in October 2014, so don’t expect to see many more new PCs preinstalled with Windows 7 Home Basic, Home Premium, or Ultimate.

Vía http://download.cnet.com/

Anuncios

Microsoft vende 40 millones de Windows 8 en su primer mes de vida


El ritmo de la demanda hace prever que superará fácilmente las ventas de su predecesor, Windows 7 cuando concluya su primer trimestre

Por
 

Microsoft vendió 40 millones de licencias de su nuevo sistema operativo Windows 8 durante el primer mes de este software en el mercado, según dio a conocer en un comunicado.

El ritmo de la demanda hace prever que Windows 8 superará fácilmente las ventas de su predecesor Windows 7 cuando concluya su primer trimestre. Leer más “Microsoft vende 40 millones de Windows 8 en su primer mes de vida”

Usuarios de Windows 7 ya pueden probar Internet Explorer 10



|

Internet Explorer 10Siendo honestos, Internet Explorer no es un nombre grato para la mayoría de quienes tenemos alguna idea de tecnología. Pero, siendo justos, el navegador de Microsoft está haciendo méritos para que le demos una nueva oportunidad. La versión 10, que ya venía incluida en Windows 8, ha recibido buenos comentarios de parte de la prensa internacional y es -según un estudio de New Relix, una firma de estudio de rendimiento de software- el browser más rápido para cualquier versión de Windows.

Desde este martes, los usuarios de Windows 7 podrán descargarse una versión de prueba para echar un vistazo. Entre sus nuevas funcionalidades está la activación por defecto de la opción ‘do not track’, una mejor compatibilidad con estándares Web como HTML 5 y CSS3 y mejoras en el rendimiento y en la compatibilidad con pantallas táctiles, un formato no muy extendido en Windows 7, pero presente. Leer más “Usuarios de Windows 7 ya pueden probar Internet Explorer 10”

Windows 8 Must Battle XP for Large Chunk of User Base


mashable.com

While Windows 8 rolled out to great fanfare Thursday, it still has to fight fellow Microsoft operating system Windows XP for users.

The 11-year-old program has nearly 30% “usage share” worldwide, reports web analytics firm StatCounter. Although Microsoft stopped selling it in 2010, XP remains one of the most popular OSestoday.

As of September, XP holds 27.64% usage share worldwide — second only to Windows 7 at 52.2%, according to StatCounter. In the U.S., XP has 16.42%, while Windows 7 sits at 49.36% (the latter debuted in 2009).

SEE ALSO: How to Get Windows 8 Now

“Our stats confirm the theory that business users in particular have been reluctant to move from XP,” said StatCounter CEO Aodhan Cullen. “The new Windows 8 interface represents a radical overhaul for Microsoft.”

“The scale of change of the desktop experience, however, may heighten the initial reluctance of traditional business users to upgrade to this new OS.” Leer más “Windows 8 Must Battle XP for Large Chunk of User Base”

Internet Explorer 9 Beta: Reviewed and Benchmarked | Nettuts+


Windows Internet Explorer 9 Banner

Summary

It appears Microsoft has clear goals when it comes to IE9. They want to embrace modern standards and contribute to governing bodies like W3C to aid interoperability. IE9 is a massive leap forward from IE8′s attempts at HTML5, CSS3 and SVG. And it also feels like this is the browser they wanted to release with Windows 7. Looking at some of the new interface changes, like Jump Lists, reinforces this.

The benchmarks have shown problems still exist between IE9 and HTML5, but the advancements in hardware acceleration really shine through. Bugs do exist, some websites fail to load and it may take some time to get used to the new layout, but we need to remember this is still in beta stages, so maybe we could forgive it for the odd problem throughout development.

So despite it’s cons, I’m happy testing out my latest web designs in IE9 and I am really excited about the final product.

I hope you have enjoyed this introduction to IE9 Beta and try it out, even if it is only to play PacMan in the IE9 Test Center!

Full test here:
Internet Explorer 9 Beta: Reviewed and Benchmarked | Nettuts+
.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Is Microsoft Ceding the Tablet Market to Apple?

Someone should let Microsoft know that waiting to join the multitouch tablet game, a year and a half after Apple revolutionized it, just isn’t going to work this time.

This news isn’t coming from Microsoft itself, so a healthy dose of salt should be applied. The source is Jeffries analyst Katherine Egbert. She has been speaking to Microsoft’s General Manager of Investor Relations, so the estimate is pretty close to the horse’s mouth (and may, if anything, be a little optimistic).

The problem is Windows 7, which is absolutely not optimized for a tablet’s touchscreen interface–particularly in a world of multitouch gestural interfaces. To see proof of this, look no further than Steve Ballmer’s fumbling demonstration of HP’s slate PC prototype from January of 2010. Ballmer’s fingers repeatedly skitter past the tiny finger-unfriendly icons on windows.


BY Kit Eaton
http://www.fastcompany.com/1692351/microsoft-surrendering-the-tablet-pc-race-to-apple-no-windows-tablets-til-mid-2011

Microsoft tablet

Someone should let Microsoft know that waiting to join the multitouch tablet game, a year and a half after Apple revolutionized it, just isn’t going to work this time.

This news isn’t coming from Microsoft itself, so a healthy dose of salt should be applied. The source is Jeffries analyst Katherine Egbert. She has been speaking to Microsoft’s General Manager of Investor Relations, so the estimate is pretty close to the horse’s mouth (and may, if anything, be a little optimistic).

The problem is Windows 7, which is absolutely not optimized for a tablet’s touchscreen interface–particularly in a world of multitouch gestural interfaces. To see proof of this, look no further than Steve Ballmer‘s fumbling demonstration of HP‘s slate PC prototype from January of 2010. Ballmer’s fingers repeatedly skitter past the tiny finger-unfriendly icons on windows. Leer más “Is Microsoft Ceding the Tablet Market to Apple?”

Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft

For the first time, Internet Explorer now sports cutting-edge support for HTML5, the collection of emerging standards that permit sites to deliver slicker graphics and typography, richer interfaces that feel more like traditional software and video that doesn’t require a plug-in such as Adobe Flash. Like an eye-popping 3-D game, the software takes full advantage of your PC’s graphics hardware, enabling glitzy animation at high speeds. (See pictures of vintage computers.)

This browser is so on top of next-generation Web technologies, in fact, that it has zipped ahead of most of the Web itself. For now, the most impressive evidence of its capabilities are demos that Microsoft and its partners have ginned up. But when better sites are built, IE9 will be ready.

Not being ready for the new Web wasn’t really an option for Microsoft. Research firm Net Applications says that Internet Explorer retains 60% of the browser market, but it long ago lost the confidence and attention of most of the people who care enough about browsers to make a considered choice. (On my site, Technologizer, it’s only the third most popular browser — Firefox and Chrome are No. 1 and No. 2.) IE9 is the first version in eons that gives browser enthusiasts something to be enthusiastic about.

Still, I don’t see Internet Explorer ever again crushing the competition like it once did. Too many excellent options are just a free download away: Firefox, Chrome, Apple’s Safari (available for Windows as well as Macs) and Norwegian underdog Opera. I also like Flock, which is based on the same underpinnings as Chrome, but with built-in features relating to Facebook, Twitter and other forms of online socializing. (See the best social-networking applications.)


By Harry McCracken | //time.com

Like many of us, Microsoft does its best work when it’s running scared. Back in the mid-1990s, when Bill Gates & Co. thought that pioneering Web browser Netscape Navigator posed an existential threat to Windows, they responded by bundling their own new browser, Internet Explorer, with Windows 95. That led to the little legal kerfuffle known as United States v. Microsoft. But the truth is that Internet Explorer got so good so quickly that things would have been dicey for Netscape no matter what.

Microsoft’s share of the browser market passed 90% early in this century. With Netscape vanquished, the Internet Explorer team went into hibernation, ignoring the software until it was an embarrassing, archaic mess. Even versions 7 and 8 — released after an army of volunteer geeks resuscitated Navigator as Firefox in 2004 and began chipping away at Explorer’s monopoly — weren’t exactly scintillating. (See the 50 best websites of 2010.)

Last week, Microsoft unveiled the first beta release of Internet Explorer 9, or IE9 for short. It’s easily the most impressive browser upgrade to hail from Redmond, Wash., since the original skirmishes with Netscape. And I don’t think it’s mere coincidence that it’s the first one the company has hatched since its scariest current competitor, Google, got into the browser business by launching Chrome two years ago this month.

As beta software, IE9 is by definition a somewhat glitchy work in progress. Past Internet Explorer upgrade schedules suggest that the final version will show up sometime in 2011. If you’re curious — and not overly cautious — go ahead and download the beta here.

(One new Internet Explorer feature shuts out a sizable percentage of its potential user base: it now works only with Windows 7 and Windows Vista. Sorry, XP holdouts — Microsoft isn’t about to reward you for refusing to upgrade your nine-year-old operating system.) Leer más “Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft”