Windows 7 mainstream support ends vía @DownloadNow by @TuongLNguyen


Windows-7On January 13, Microsoft officially ends mainstream support for Windows 7 Service Pack 1.
Regular users will still get security fixes. You can still get Windows 7 Pro licenses if you’re planning on purchasing a new system or if you’re finally upgrading from Windows XP.

  • Esto no significa que no haya más actualizaciones de seguridad ni que el sistema operativo quede abandonado.
  • Simplemente finaliza el derecho a llamar o contactar de forma online conMicrosoft para resolver problemas.

En esta ocasión, que Microsoft finalice el soporte a Windows 7, no significa que no haya más actualizaciones de seguridad ni que el sistema operativo quede abandonado.

What end of mainstream support means
For corporate users, it’s business as usual.
For home users, free online and phone support are disappearing. Microsoft stopped distributing new licenses to manufacturers and vendors in October 2014, so don’t expect to see many more new PCs preinstalled with Windows 7 Home Basic, Home Premium, or Ultimate.

Vía http://download.cnet.com/

Microsoft vende 40 millones de Windows 8 en su primer mes de vida


El ritmo de la demanda hace prever que superará fácilmente las ventas de su predecesor, Windows 7 cuando concluya su primer trimestre

Por
 

Microsoft vendió 40 millones de licencias de su nuevo sistema operativo Windows 8 durante el primer mes de este software en el mercado, según dio a conocer en un comunicado.

El ritmo de la demanda hace prever que Windows 8 superará fácilmente las ventas de su predecesor Windows 7 cuando concluya su primer trimestre. Leer más “Microsoft vende 40 millones de Windows 8 en su primer mes de vida”

Usuarios de Windows 7 ya pueden probar Internet Explorer 10



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Internet Explorer 10Siendo honestos, Internet Explorer no es un nombre grato para la mayoría de quienes tenemos alguna idea de tecnología. Pero, siendo justos, el navegador de Microsoft está haciendo méritos para que le demos una nueva oportunidad. La versión 10, que ya venía incluida en Windows 8, ha recibido buenos comentarios de parte de la prensa internacional y es -según un estudio de New Relix, una firma de estudio de rendimiento de software- el browser más rápido para cualquier versión de Windows.

Desde este martes, los usuarios de Windows 7 podrán descargarse una versión de prueba para echar un vistazo. Entre sus nuevas funcionalidades está la activación por defecto de la opción ‘do not track’, una mejor compatibilidad con estándares Web como HTML 5 y CSS3 y mejoras en el rendimiento y en la compatibilidad con pantallas táctiles, un formato no muy extendido en Windows 7, pero presente. Leer más “Usuarios de Windows 7 ya pueden probar Internet Explorer 10”

Windows 8 Must Battle XP for Large Chunk of User Base


mashable.com

While Windows 8 rolled out to great fanfare Thursday, it still has to fight fellow Microsoft operating system Windows XP for users.

The 11-year-old program has nearly 30% “usage share” worldwide, reports web analytics firm StatCounter. Although Microsoft stopped selling it in 2010, XP remains one of the most popular OSestoday.

As of September, XP holds 27.64% usage share worldwide — second only to Windows 7 at 52.2%, according to StatCounter. In the U.S., XP has 16.42%, while Windows 7 sits at 49.36% (the latter debuted in 2009).

SEE ALSO: How to Get Windows 8 Now

“Our stats confirm the theory that business users in particular have been reluctant to move from XP,” said StatCounter CEO Aodhan Cullen. “The new Windows 8 interface represents a radical overhaul for Microsoft.”

“The scale of change of the desktop experience, however, may heighten the initial reluctance of traditional business users to upgrade to this new OS.” Leer más “Windows 8 Must Battle XP for Large Chunk of User Base”

Internet Explorer 9 Beta: Reviewed and Benchmarked | Nettuts+


Windows Internet Explorer 9 Banner

Summary

It appears Microsoft has clear goals when it comes to IE9. They want to embrace modern standards and contribute to governing bodies like W3C to aid interoperability. IE9 is a massive leap forward from IE8′s attempts at HTML5, CSS3 and SVG. And it also feels like this is the browser they wanted to release with Windows 7. Looking at some of the new interface changes, like Jump Lists, reinforces this.

The benchmarks have shown problems still exist between IE9 and HTML5, but the advancements in hardware acceleration really shine through. Bugs do exist, some websites fail to load and it may take some time to get used to the new layout, but we need to remember this is still in beta stages, so maybe we could forgive it for the odd problem throughout development.

So despite it’s cons, I’m happy testing out my latest web designs in IE9 and I am really excited about the final product.

I hope you have enjoyed this introduction to IE9 Beta and try it out, even if it is only to play PacMan in the IE9 Test Center!

Full test here:
Internet Explorer 9 Beta: Reviewed and Benchmarked | Nettuts+
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Is Microsoft Ceding the Tablet Market to Apple?

Someone should let Microsoft know that waiting to join the multitouch tablet game, a year and a half after Apple revolutionized it, just isn’t going to work this time.

This news isn’t coming from Microsoft itself, so a healthy dose of salt should be applied. The source is Jeffries analyst Katherine Egbert. She has been speaking to Microsoft’s General Manager of Investor Relations, so the estimate is pretty close to the horse’s mouth (and may, if anything, be a little optimistic).

The problem is Windows 7, which is absolutely not optimized for a tablet’s touchscreen interface–particularly in a world of multitouch gestural interfaces. To see proof of this, look no further than Steve Ballmer’s fumbling demonstration of HP’s slate PC prototype from January of 2010. Ballmer’s fingers repeatedly skitter past the tiny finger-unfriendly icons on windows.


BY Kit Eaton
http://www.fastcompany.com/1692351/microsoft-surrendering-the-tablet-pc-race-to-apple-no-windows-tablets-til-mid-2011

Microsoft tablet

Someone should let Microsoft know that waiting to join the multitouch tablet game, a year and a half after Apple revolutionized it, just isn’t going to work this time.

This news isn’t coming from Microsoft itself, so a healthy dose of salt should be applied. The source is Jeffries analyst Katherine Egbert. She has been speaking to Microsoft’s General Manager of Investor Relations, so the estimate is pretty close to the horse’s mouth (and may, if anything, be a little optimistic).

The problem is Windows 7, which is absolutely not optimized for a tablet’s touchscreen interface–particularly in a world of multitouch gestural interfaces. To see proof of this, look no further than Steve Ballmer‘s fumbling demonstration of HP‘s slate PC prototype from January of 2010. Ballmer’s fingers repeatedly skitter past the tiny finger-unfriendly icons on windows. Leer más “Is Microsoft Ceding the Tablet Market to Apple?”

Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft

For the first time, Internet Explorer now sports cutting-edge support for HTML5, the collection of emerging standards that permit sites to deliver slicker graphics and typography, richer interfaces that feel more like traditional software and video that doesn’t require a plug-in such as Adobe Flash. Like an eye-popping 3-D game, the software takes full advantage of your PC’s graphics hardware, enabling glitzy animation at high speeds. (See pictures of vintage computers.)

This browser is so on top of next-generation Web technologies, in fact, that it has zipped ahead of most of the Web itself. For now, the most impressive evidence of its capabilities are demos that Microsoft and its partners have ginned up. But when better sites are built, IE9 will be ready.

Not being ready for the new Web wasn’t really an option for Microsoft. Research firm Net Applications says that Internet Explorer retains 60% of the browser market, but it long ago lost the confidence and attention of most of the people who care enough about browsers to make a considered choice. (On my site, Technologizer, it’s only the third most popular browser — Firefox and Chrome are No. 1 and No. 2.) IE9 is the first version in eons that gives browser enthusiasts something to be enthusiastic about.

Still, I don’t see Internet Explorer ever again crushing the competition like it once did. Too many excellent options are just a free download away: Firefox, Chrome, Apple’s Safari (available for Windows as well as Macs) and Norwegian underdog Opera. I also like Flock, which is based on the same underpinnings as Chrome, but with built-in features relating to Facebook, Twitter and other forms of online socializing. (See the best social-networking applications.)


By Harry McCracken | //time.com

Like many of us, Microsoft does its best work when it’s running scared. Back in the mid-1990s, when Bill Gates & Co. thought that pioneering Web browser Netscape Navigator posed an existential threat to Windows, they responded by bundling their own new browser, Internet Explorer, with Windows 95. That led to the little legal kerfuffle known as United States v. Microsoft. But the truth is that Internet Explorer got so good so quickly that things would have been dicey for Netscape no matter what.

Microsoft’s share of the browser market passed 90% early in this century. With Netscape vanquished, the Internet Explorer team went into hibernation, ignoring the software until it was an embarrassing, archaic mess. Even versions 7 and 8 — released after an army of volunteer geeks resuscitated Navigator as Firefox in 2004 and began chipping away at Explorer’s monopoly — weren’t exactly scintillating. (See the 50 best websites of 2010.)

Last week, Microsoft unveiled the first beta release of Internet Explorer 9, or IE9 for short. It’s easily the most impressive browser upgrade to hail from Redmond, Wash., since the original skirmishes with Netscape. And I don’t think it’s mere coincidence that it’s the first one the company has hatched since its scariest current competitor, Google, got into the browser business by launching Chrome two years ago this month.

As beta software, IE9 is by definition a somewhat glitchy work in progress. Past Internet Explorer upgrade schedules suggest that the final version will show up sometime in 2011. If you’re curious — and not overly cautious — go ahead and download the beta here.

(One new Internet Explorer feature shuts out a sizable percentage of its potential user base: it now works only with Windows 7 and Windows Vista. Sorry, XP holdouts — Microsoft isn’t about to reward you for refusing to upgrade your nine-year-old operating system.) Leer más “Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft”

Los mejores atajos de teclado en Windows 7

Todos los entusiastas de los ordenadores sabemos que muchas veces cuando queremos trabajar de la manera más rápida, una de las soluciones está en usar los atajos de teclado. A menos que no estemos muy familiarizados con el teclado, la opción siempre será usar el ratón. Esto, unido con un ordenador de amplias prestaciones y un OS y programas ligeros, te permitirá agilizar tu manera de usar el ordenador.


Misael Aguilar

Todos los entusiastas de los ordenadores sabemos que muchas veces cuando queremos trabajar de la manera más rápida, una de las soluciones está en usar los atajos de teclado. A menos que no estemos muy familiarizados con el teclado, la opción siempre será usar el ratón. Esto, unido con un ordenador de amplias prestaciones y un OS y programas ligeros, te permitirá agilizar tu manera de usar el ordenador.

Los atajos de teclado permiten agilizar el trabajo en el ordenador

Aquí te presentamos la lista con la selección de los mejores y más necesarios atajos de teclado para el OS Windows 7,con muchas mejoras respecto al XP:
Trabajo con ventanas

  • Win + Home: cierra todo menos ventana activa
  • Win + Space: transparenta las ventanas para visualizar escritorio
  • Win + D: minimiza ventanas para visualizar escritorio
  • Win + ↑: maximiza ventana activa
  • Win + ↓: minimiza ventana activa
  • Shift + Win + ↑: maximiza ventana activa verticalmente
  • Shift + Win + →/←: ancla ventana activa a la derecha/izquierda de la pantalla
  • Alt + F4: cerrar ventana activa

Barra de tareas… Leer más “Los mejores atajos de teclado en Windows 7”

Technology’s Biggest Myths

Expensive cables are better! Defragging speeds up your PC! Refilling ink cartridges ruins your printer! We put these and nine other claims to the test to find the truth behind tech’s tallest tales.

Patrick Miller, PC World

Illustration by Keith NegleyAs it turns out, Windows Vista really wasn’t all that slow; and no, your PC probably won’t fry if you open it up without wearing a wrist strap. Thanks in large part to the Internet, the tech world is teeming with lies, half-truths, and misinformation. We’ve dug up some of the Web’s most notorious nuggets of conventional wisdom to see which hold up to scrutiny and which are merely urban legends.

Of course, there’s often a grain of truth in even the most fanciful myth. That’s why we provide a handy-dandy set of numbered warning signs to indicate how accurate each of these myths is, with 1 being True and 4 being Outrageous–a complete fabrication. After all, they say numbers never lie.
The Claim: Vista Is Slower Than Windows 7

When Windows Vista came out, it soon acquired a reputation for being slow and a resource hog. Once Windows 7 arrived, people were quick to tout it as the speedy, slim operating system that Vista should have been.

We conducted performance tests on a handful of laptops and desktops using both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Vista and Windows 7, shortly after the latter OS was released. While results varied across configurations, a few trends stood out. Windows 7 raised WorldBench 6 scores from 1.25 percent to almost 10 percent (but most often in the vicinity of 2 to 3 percent); it also resulted in much faster disk operations (in Windows 7 our Nero disc-burning software tests ran twice as fast on an IdeaPad laptop, and 2.5 times as fast on a Gateway laptop), and in slightly longer battery life (the IdeaPad lasted only an extra minute; the Gateway got an extra 15 minutes).

While Windows 7 did seem to speed things up somewhat, a few tests actually showed some slowdown. Applications launched more slowly across the board (the most dramatic change was a 2.7-second Photoshop CS4 launch in Vista turning into a 9.6-second launch in Windows 7), and the Gateway laptop saw a slight increase in startup time (39.6 seconds in Vista; 43.6 seconds in Windows 7).

As it turns out, the “snappy” feeling Windows 7 engenders has to do with Registry tweaks and minor changes to the window manager that make the OS feel more responsive, even though it isn’t that different.

The verdict: Windows 7 is faster, but not by as much as you may think.


Expensive cables are better! Defragging speeds up your PC! Refilling ink cartridges ruins your printer! We put these and nine other claims to the test to find the truth behind tech’s tallest tales.

Patrick Miller, PC World

Illustration by Keith NegleyAs it turns out, Windows Vista really wasn’t all that slow; and no, your PC probably won’t fry if you open it up without wearing a wrist strap. Thanks in large part to the Internet, the tech world is teeming with lies, half-truths, and misinformation. We’ve dug up some of the Web’s most notorious nuggets of conventional wisdom to see which hold up to scrutiny and which are merely urban legends.

Of course, there’s often a grain of truth in even the most fanciful myth. That’s why we provide a handy-dandy set of numbered warning signs to indicate how accurate each of these myths is, with 1 being True and 4 being Outrageous–a complete fabrication. After all, they say numbers never lie.

The Claim: Vista Is Slower Than Windows 7

When Windows Vista came out, it soon acquired a reputation for being slow and a resource hog. Once Windows 7 arrived, people were quick to tout it as the speedy, slim operating system that Vista should have been.

We conducted performance tests on a handful of laptops and desktops using both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Vista and Windows 7, shortly after the latter OS was released. While results varied across configurations, a few trends stood out. Windows 7 raised WorldBench 6 scores from 1.25 percent to almost 10 percent (but most often in the vicinity of 2 to 3 percent); it also resulted in much faster disk operations (in Windows 7 our Nero disc-burning software tests ran twice as fast on an IdeaPad laptop, and 2.5 times as fast on a Gateway laptop), and in slightly longer battery life (the IdeaPad lasted only an extra minute; the Gateway got an extra 15 minutes).

While Windows 7 did seem to speed things up somewhat, a few tests actually showed some slowdown. Applications launched more slowly across the board (the most dramatic change was a 2.7-second Photoshop CS4 launch in Vista turning into a 9.6-second launch in Windows 7), and the Gateway laptop saw a slight increase in startup time (39.6 seconds in Vista; 43.6 seconds in Windows 7).

As it turns out, the “snappy” feeling Windows 7 engenders has to do with Registry tweaks and minor changes to the window manager that make the OS feel more responsive, even though it isn’t that different.

The verdict: Windows 7 is faster, but not by as much as you may think. Leer más “Technology’s Biggest Myths”

A Free Utility to Backup all your Windows Drivers

When you buy a new PC, the vendor will almost always provide you with a “driver CD” that has the device drivers for all the hardware that’s inside your new machine. The CD comes handy when you are reinstalling Windows from scratch or are trying to recover your machine to its original state after, say, a system crash.

There are however two drawbacks with the driver CD.


windows hardware

When you buy a new PC, the vendor will almost always provide you with a “driver CD” that has the device drivers for all the hardware that’s inside your new machine. The CD comes handy when you are reinstalling Windows from scratch or are trying to recover your machine to its original state after, say, a system crash.

There are however two drawbacks with the driver CD. Leer más “A Free Utility to Backup all your Windows Drivers”

How to Password Protect your Files and Folders

Do you have files and folders on your computer that you absolutely don’t want anyone else to see? Or do you even carry important documents on those easy-to-misplace USB drives?

If the answer is yes, you should definitely download a copy of SafeHouse Explorer – it’s a free and incredibly easy-to-use file encryption utility that will hide all your private files from prying eyes in few easy steps. You may use the tool to password protect files that are residing on your computer’s internal hard disk or even on external USB drives.
Tutorial: Encrypt and Password Protect your Files and Folders

SafeHouse Explorer, in simple English, works something like this. It creates a hidden storage area on your disk to hold all the files that you want to protect. These files and folders are hidden from normal view and will only become visible when you enter the correct password.

Here’s a more detailed tutorial on how you can protect your files with SafeHouse Explorer.


folder passwordDo you have files and folders on your computer that you absolutely don’t want anyone else to see? Or do you even carry important documents on those easy-to-misplace USB drives?

If the answer is yes, you should definitely download a copy of SafeHouse Explorer – it’s a free and incredibly easy-to-use file encryption utility that will hide all your private files from prying eyes in few easy steps. You may use the tool to password protect files that are residing on your computer’s internal hard disk or even on external USB drives.

Tutorial: Encrypt and Password Protect your Files and Folders

SafeHouse Explorer, in simple English, works something like this. It creates a hidden storage area on your disk to hold all the files that you want to protect. These files and folders are hidden from normal view and will only become visible when you enter the correct password.

Here’s a more detailed tutorial on how you can protect your files with SafeHouse Explorer. Leer más “How to Password Protect your Files and Folders”

The Different Ways to Backup your Home Computer

There are a couple of ways by which you can backup your documents, photos, emails and other important files that on your home computer. For instance, you may:

external hard disk1. Use an external drive – You can attach an external hard disk to your PC or Mac through the USB port and use the built-in software to backup all your important files and folders automatically. These devices are sleek, portable and some even have FireWire ports so the data transfer happens at a much faster rate.

2. Clone the computer – You can use disk imaging tools like Acronis True Image or DriveImage XML (free for personal use) to create an exact mirror image of your hard-drive. The tools will even backup your system files and program settings so you can easily restore the computer to a working state in case your hard-drive crashes.

[*] If you are using Windows 7, you don’t really need any of these tools as the OS itself has a backup tool that will let you create system images at any point of time. You can store these snapshots on another partition of the same hard-disk or you may use an external drive.


There are a couple of ways by which you can backup your documents, photos, emails and other important files that on your home computer. For instance, you may:

external hard disk1. Use an external drive – You can attach an external hard disk to your PC or Mac through the USB port and use the built-in software to backup all your important files and folders automatically. These devices are sleek, portable and some even have FireWire ports so the data transfer happens at a much faster rate.

2. Clone the computer – You can use disk imaging tools like Acronis True Image or DriveImage XML (free for personal use) to create an exact mirror image of your hard-drive. The tools will even backup your system files and program settings so you can easily restore the computer to a working state in case your hard-drive crashes.

[*] If you are using Windows 7, you don’t really need any of these tools as the OS itself has a backup tool that will let you create system images at any point of time. You can store these snapshots on another partition of the same hard-disk or you may use an external drive. Leer más “The Different Ways to Backup your Home Computer”

Arc Touch Mouse, nuevo trackpad de Microsoft

Pues finalmente salió a la luz, es el Arc Touch Mouse, el cual es el resultado de un proyecto en el que Microsoft Research había estado trabajando desde finales del año pasado, bajo el nombre de Mouse 2.0, en el cual se mencionaban características multi-táctiles.

Se espera esté en los anaqueles de tiendas especializadas a partir de septiembre, con un precio de $69.95 dólares. Aunque, tal y como reporta el sitio Gizmología.com, por el momento sólo se menciona disponibilidad en los Estados Unidos.

Aunque no hay mucha información disponible, se espera que sea un rival para el Magic Trackpad de la Apple. O al menos esperemos que sean una buena alternativa para las pantallas táctiles de Windows 7. Mientras veremos si en realidad es el final del mouse como lo conocemos.


Autor: Misael Aguilar

Microsoft finalmente se anuncia el lanzamiento de un trackpad bajo el nombre de Arc Touch Mouse, esto después de un buen tiempo en suspenso por parte de la compañía con sede en Redmon, Washington.

Finalmente se anuncia lanzamiento de Arc Touch Mouse de Microsoft

Y es que el plan de Microsoft fue ir mostrando poco a poco pedazos de una imagen en la cuenta @msfthardware en Twitter, en la cual tenías que ir construyendo los pedazos y tratar de adivinar de que se trataba., con las pistas que te iban dando. La primera pista fue don’t be so touchy… flat is where it’s at, lo que en español sería algo así como no seas tan sensible… plano es donde está. Lo cual hace referencia a algo sensible y plano. Leer más “Arc Touch Mouse, nuevo trackpad de Microsoft”

Windows 7 supera a Windows Vista

Autor: i.aguilar

NetMarketShare publicó que el SO de la empresa Microsoft, Windows 7 superó a Windows Vista en cuota de mercado este mes de Agosto, ocupando el segundo lugar en Sistemas Operativos más usados a nivel mundial con un 14.46% de cuota.

El Sistema Operativo Windows 7 supero a Vista

El SO más usado en el mundo hasta el momento sigue siendo el Windows XP con un 61.87% de cuota, pero a como van las cosas poco a poco Windows 7 le irá ganando terreno porque según NetMarketShare todos los SO han perdido cuota, excepto Windows 7 que va hacia arriba.

Esto es muy normal ya que Windows 7 es un SO que realmente escuchó las quejas de los usuarios del Windows Vista, y para mí en lo personal es un Sistema Operativo muy amigable, que por el momento no me ha dado ningún problema.

Creo que Windows XP es el SO de Microsoft que sigue dominando en el mundo porque mucha gente no se anima a cambiarlo porque no quieren experimentar, porque se sienten bien con el Windows XP, porque su ordenador no cumple los requisitos mínimos para el cambio (por este motivo Microsoft extendió el downgrade a Windows XP), porque tuvieron mala experiencia con el Windows Vista o simplemente porque no les importa.

La verdad es que Windows 7 a comparación con el Windows XP, tiene muchas utilidades y aplicaciones que simplifican la vida y sin contar con su DirectX 11 que hace que los gráficos de videojuegos y películas en blu-ray se vean espectaculares comparándolo con el pobre y obsoleto DirectX 9 del XP.


Autor: i.aguilar

NetMarketShare publicó que el SO de la empresa Microsoft, Windows 7 superó a Windows Vista en cuota de mercado este mes de Agosto, ocupando el segundo lugar en Sistemas Operativos más usados a nivel mundial con un 14.46% de cuota.

El Sistema Operativo Windows 7 supero a Vista

El SO más usado en el mundo hasta el momento sigue siendo el Windows XP con un 61.87% de cuota, pero a como van las cosas poco a poco Windows 7 le irá ganando terreno porque según NetMarketShare todos los SO han perdido cuota, excepto Windows 7 que va hacia arriba.

Esto es muy normal ya que Windows 7 es un SO que realmente escuchó las quejas de los usuarios del Windows Vista, y para mí en lo personal es un Sistema Operativo muy amigable, que por el momento no me ha dado ningún problema.

Creo que Windows XP es el SO de Microsoft que sigue dominando en el mundo porque mucha gente no se anima a cambiarlo porque no quieren experimentar, porque se sienten bien con el Windows XP, porque su ordenador no cumple los requisitos mínimos para el cambio (por este motivo Microsoft extendió el downgrade a Windows XP), porque tuvieron mala experiencia con el Windows Vista o simplemente porque no les importa.

La verdad es que Windows 7 a comparación con el Windows XP, tiene muchas utilidades y aplicaciones que simplifican la vida y sin contar con su DirectX 11 que hace que los gráficos de videojuegos y películas en blu-ray se vean espectaculares comparándolo con el pobre y obsoleto DirectX 9 del XP. Leer más “Windows 7 supera a Windows Vista”

Prepare for Record Patch Tuesday

By Tony Bradley, PC World

Next Tuesday Microsoft will unleash 14 new security bulletins, addressing a record-tying 34 vulnerabilities. In the wake of the out-of-band patch issued for the Windows shortcut security flaw, and with an upcoming out-of-band patch from Adobe as well–IT admins need to a plan of action for implementing the deluge of updates.

Issuing 14 security bulletins in one month is a new one, but the record of patching 34 different flaws is not so uncommon any more. This is the third or fourth time that has occurred in just the past year. Microsoft has experienced a feast or famine flow of updates with virtually no security bulletins one month, followed by a massive batch of security bulletins the next. Microsoft has also had an unusual number of out-of-band patches this year to address attacks against zero-day vulnerabilities.

Wolfgang Kandek, CTO of Qualys, provides a brief analysis of the upcoming Microsoft patches on his blog. “Including the LNK update, 9 bulletins have a rating of critical and affect all version of the Windows OS, Internet Explorer, Silverlight and Microsoft Office.”

However, Kandek goes on to clarify that “Windows 7 and 2008 R2 have a smaller number of critical vulnerabilities than Windows XP and 2003 in function of their improved security architecture, but are still affected by 2 critical vulnerabilities each.”


By Tony Bradley, PC World

Next Tuesday Microsoft will unleash 14 new security bulletins, addressing a record-tying 34 vulnerabilities. In the wake of the out-of-band patch issued for the Windows shortcut security flaw, and with an upcoming out-of-band patch from Adobe as well–IT admins need to a plan of action for implementing the deluge of updates.

Issuing 14 security bulletins in one month is a new one, but the record of patching 34 different flaws is not so uncommon any more. This is the third or fourth time that has occurred in just the past year. Microsoft has experienced a feast or famine flow of updates with virtually no security bulletins one month, followed by a massive batch of security bulletins the next. Microsoft has also had an unusual number of out-of-band patches this year to address attacks against zero-day vulnerabilities.

Wolfgang Kandek, CTO of Qualys, provides a brief analysis of the upcoming Microsoft patches on his blog. “Including the LNK update, 9 bulletins have a rating of critical and affect all version of the Windows OS, Internet Explorer, Silverlight and Microsoft Office.”

However, Kandek goes on to clarify that “Windows 7 and 2008 R2 have a smaller number of critical vulnerabilities than Windows XP and 2003 in function of their improved security architecture, but are still affected by 2 critical vulnerabilities each.” Leer más “Prepare for Record Patch Tuesday”