Julian Assange publicará libro sobre la libertad y el futuro de internet


No cabe duda que la vida de Julian Assange en los últimos años da para escribir un libro, aunque esa tarea no se le ha dado fácil al fundador de WikiLeaks. Su último intento de escribir uno terminó en desastre cuando Assange canceló los contratos que tenía con la editorial, y la compañía publicó una autobiografía que estaba en etapa de borrador en contra de la voluntad de su autor. Leer más “Julian Assange publicará libro sobre la libertad y el futuro de internet”

WikiLeaks recibe ataques DDoS tras revelar TrapWire | vía CHIKANADAS


http://chikanad.wordpress.com

WikiLeaks mostraba TrapWire, una red de espionaje del gobierno que hacía uso de las cámaras ordinarias que se instalan en las ciudades de Estados Unidos. Un registro masivo de identificación de los ciudadanos que luego era transferido a otros grupos de inteligencia en el país. Por causa de esto es imposible de ver el sitio, un ataque DDoS imposibilita la visita.

Según los papeles mostrados conseguida a través de la filtración de la compañía Stratfor, es una tecnología que recopila los datos de las cámaras publicas y privadas. Los agentes pueden utilizar unsoftware de reconocimiento facial para luego analizar todo el material de las cámaras y seleccionar sospechosos.

David Seaman de Business Insider, define: Leer más “WikiLeaks recibe ataques DDoS tras revelar TrapWire | vía CHIKANADAS”

FLAWSOME

“human nature dictates that people have a hard time genuinely connectingwith, being close to, or really trusting other humans who (pretend to) have no weaknesses, flaws, or mistakes”

Consumers’ disillusionment at corporate behavior has (finally) spilled over into outright disgust. As a result, any brand that can show business in a new light will be (deservedly) welcomed with open arms.
Nearly 85% of consumers worldwide expect companies to become actively involved in promoting individual and collective wellbeing; an increase of 15% from 2010 (Source: Havas Media, November 2011).
Yet only 28% of people think that companies are working hard to solve the big social and environmental challenges (Source: Havas Media, November 2011).
Consumers are more and more aware that personality and profit can be compatible (think Zappos, Patagonia, Tom’s, Ben & Jerry’s, Michel et Augustin, Zalando and more). With every business that succeeds while remaining reasonable, helpful, fun or even somewhat ‘human’, consumers will become increasingly disenchanted when dealing with traditional, boring, impersonal brands.
Most people would not care if 70% of brands ceased to exist (Source: Havas Media, November 2011).
Online culture is the culture, and inflexible, bland ‘corporate’ façades jar with consumers who live online where communication is immediate, open and raw (also see MATURIALISM). What’s more, people openly broadcast and share their lives online – flaws and all – and thus brands are increasingly expected to do the same.
Last but not least: human nature dictates that people have a hard time genuinely connecting with, being close to, or really trusting other humans who (pretend to) have no weaknesses, flaws, or mistakes – don’t assume brands are any different.


FLAWSOME

FLAWSOME definition:

Consumers don’t expect brands to be flawless. In fact, consumers will embrace brands that are FLAWSOME*: brands that are still brilliant despite having flaws; even being flawed (and being open about it) can be awesome. Brands that show some empathy, generosity, humility, flexibility, maturity, humor, and (dare we say it) some character and humanity.

Two key drivers are fueling the FLAWSOME trend:

  • HUMAN BRANDS: Everything from disgust at business to the influence of online culture (with its honesty and immediacy), is driving consumers away from bland, boring brands in favor of brands with some personality.
  • TRANSPARENCY TRIUMPH: Consumers are benefiting from almost total and utter transparency (and thus are finding out about flaws anyway), as a result of the torrent of readily available reviews, leaks and ratings.

* Yup, FLAWSOME is by far our most cringeworthy trend name. But we bet you’ll remember it 😉

HUMAN BRANDS

FLAWSOME sits as part of a bigger trend towards HUMAN BRANDS, something that we’ve touched upon in many previous Trend Briefings: RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESSBRAND BUTLERSGENERATION G, and so on.

So, while HUMAN BRANDS might not be a ‘new’ theme, four currents are now converging to make consumers more focused on brand attitude and behavior than ever before:

“human nature dictates that people have a hard time genuinely connectingwith, being close to, or really trusting other humans who (pretend to) have no weaknesses, flaws, or mistakes”

  1. Consumers’ disillusionment at corporate behavior has (finally) spilled over into outright disgust. As a result, any brand that can show business in a new light will be (deservedly) welcomed with open arms.
    • Nearly 85% of consumers worldwide expect companies to become actively involved in promoting individual and collective wellbeing; an increase of 15% from 2010 (Source: Havas Media, November 2011).
    • Yet only 28% of people think that companies are working hard to solve the big social and environmental challenges (Source: Havas Media, November 2011).
  2. Consumers are more and more aware that personality and profit can be compatible (think Zappos, Patagonia, Tom’s, Ben & Jerry’s, Michel et Augustin, Zalandoand more). With every business that succeeds while remaining reasonable, helpful, fun or even somewhat ‘human’, consumers will become increasingly disenchanted when dealing with traditional, boring, impersonal brands.
    • Most people would not care if 70% of brands ceased to exist (Source: Havas Media, November 2011).
  3. Online culture is the culture, and inflexible, bland ‘corporate’ façades jar with consumers who live online where communication is immediate, open and raw (also see MATURIALISM). What’s more, people openly broadcast and share their lives online – flaws and all – and thus brands are increasingly expected to do the same.
  4. Last but not least: human nature dictates that people have a hard time genuinely connecting with, being close to, or really trusting other humans who (pretend to) have no weaknesses, flaws, or mistakes – don’t assume brands are any different. Leer más “FLAWSOME”

Publicly Private Lives: The New Dynamic of Social Media

To post, or not to post: that is the question. Once a post, message or tweet is published, it is virtually impossible to undo. In these digital days, information becomes public in the blink of an eye. But, how much of ourselves do we really want publicly shared? As much as we’d like to think we’re in the age of ‘life as an open book’, privacy and digital surveillance are very hot topics.

eye
Take the Fourth Amendment, which protects us from unreasonable search and seizure when we have a “reasonable expectation of privacy”. However, some argue that living out our lives and communications digitally forfeits that reasonable expectation of privacy by the very nature of us putting ourselves out there in the public domain. Since we have entrusted our personal information to the various social media tools we’ve signed up for, essentially we agree that we don’t consider that personal information private – right? Oh, and since we’re also aware that surveillance exists, we expect our personal information may be tapped at any time – or do we?


by Aimee Rose
http://blog.ogilvypr.com/2011/01/publicly-private-lives-the-new-dynamic-of-social-media/#more-6385

To post, or not to post: that is the question. Once a post, message or tweet is published, it is virtually impossible to undo. In these digital days, information becomes public in the blink of an eye. But, how much of ourselves do we really want publicly shared? As much as we’d like to think we’re in the age of ‘life as an open book’, privacy and digital surveillance are very hot topics.

eye

Take the Fourth Amendment, which protects us from unreasonable search and seizure when we have a “reasonable expectation of privacy”. However, some argue that living out our lives and communications digitally forfeits that reasonable expectation of privacy by the very nature of us putting ourselves out there in the public domain. Since we have entrusted our personal information to the various social media tools we’ve signed up for, essentially we agree that we don’t consider that personal information private – right? Oh, and since we’re also aware that surveillance exists, we expect our personal information may be tapped at any time – or do we? Leer más “Publicly Private Lives: The New Dynamic of Social Media”

WikiLeaks, Influence, and The Age of Honesty

It begins when we are children. As Steve Hein of EQI.org points out, “Children start out emotionally honest. They express their true feelings freely and spontaneously. But the training to be emotionally dishonest begins at an early age. The child is told to smile when actually she is sad. She is told to apologize when she feels no regret. She may be told to kiss people good night when she would never do so voluntarily.” In short, she will slowly be influenced to conform to a social structure that attempts to control what feels true.

But what does emotional honesty have to do with WikiLeaks and Digital Influence, you ask?

It’s simple really. We are still struggling – as individuals and as countries – to break down the walls of ‘protection’ that we have been brought up to believe we must build. We have not yet replaced those walls with the bridges necessary to fully transform society.

We’re secretive. We’re protective. We’re afraid.

The good news is this: with the growing activity and discussion around network and citizen journalism, as Paulo Freire, author of Pedagogy of the Oppressed, says, “Those who have been denied their primordial right to speak their word” are finally finding their voice. For the first time since the Pentagon Papers, a site like WikiLeaks, and the influence it wields when it comes to shaping public opinion and awakening the collective (un)conscious, forces us to come to terms with how much we – personally and collectively – are willing to face truth and introduce transparency into all aspects of our lives. Only then can we truly straighten out the backbone of our troubled world. Furthermore, as the developments around WikiLeaks elicit a conversation among populations, we are compelled to recognize that this is not just about the military’s secrets, but about our own. In search of the elusive idea of safety, the emotional honesty we have been forced to abandon – and forced our children to abandon – has only shown us the high price we pay when we spend our adult lives living in fear and unhappiness or practicing deceit.


Logo used by Wikileaks
revisl by revisl
http://blog.ogilvypr.com/2010/12/wikileaks-influence-honesty/
 

 

We wear a mask that grins and lies
It hides our cheeks and shades our eyes
This debt we pay to human guile
With torn and bleeding hearts we smile

Paul Lawrence Dunbar

It begins when we are children. As Steve Hein of EQI.org points out, “Children start out emotionally honest. They express their true feelings freely and spontaneously. But the training to be emotionally dishonest begins at an early age. The child is told to smile when actually she is sad. She is told to apologize when she feels no regret. She may be told to kiss people good night when she would never do so voluntarily.” In short, she will slowly be influenced to conform to a social structure that attempts to control what feels true.

But what does emotional honesty have to do with WikiLeaks and Digital Influence, you ask?

It’s simple really. We are still struggling – as individuals and as countries – to break down the walls of ‘protection’ that we have been brought up to believe we must build. We have not yet replaced those walls with the bridges necessary to fully transform society.

We’re secretive. We’re protective. We’re afraid. Leer más “WikiLeaks, Influence, and The Age of Honesty”

50 Best Websites 2010


La lista de los mejores 50 sitios Web del año, según la revista Time

Entre los seleccionados en la categoría Noticias, Time ubica a WikiLeaks, un sitio que había hecho escaso ruido desde su creación en 2006, pero que generó una gran polémica cuando el 25 de julio de este año difundió decenas de miles de documentos que mostraron que al ejército estadounidense las cosas no le estaban yendo tan bien como se suponía en la guerra en Afganistán.

En tanto, en la categoría Música y Video, este año Time incluye a Grooveshark, un sitio que permiten buscar y escuchar música online gratis, y que cada vez suma más usuarios en la Argentina.

En la misma categoría, la revista destaca a Movieclips, un espacio para ver fragmentos de películas que se pueden buscar por título o nombre de los actores. Lo que diferencia a Movieclips –dice Time – es que cuenta con uno de los archivos más completos de Internet de breves recortes de películas.


La sorpresa es que no figuran grandes como Twitter, Google, Facebook o YouTube.

Por Leo González Pérez

Adepta a las listas de “Los mejores…” en numerosos rubros, la revista estadounidense Time dio a conocer la nómina de los sitios de Internet que, en opinión de su staff, son los mejores de 2010. La enumeración, de fuerte orientación localista y naturalmente opinable, está dividida en diez categorías, y resulta una guía interesante para asomarse a lo que está pasando en la Web.

Llama la atención en la lista la ausencia de gigantes masivos como Google, YouTube, Facebook, Skype, Amazon o Wikipedia, todos elegidos en 2009. Leer más “La lista de los mejores 50 sitios Web del año, según la revista Time”