Infographics: How to Strike the Elusive Balance between Data and Visualization

They started out as a social media experiment and then suddenly everyone wanted a piece.

A couple years back, if you dropped the word ‘Infographic’ or ‘Dataviz’ in a conversation, you would have been greeted by a good number of confused looks even if you were among other web designers.

Today, so many infographics have gone viral that it’s practically impossible to ignore them. You’ll find them tweeted by your friends who want to share an interesting new find, promoted by companies eager to display their growth trends and utilized by even the White House for its progress reports.

No matter what you are searching for online, whether employment statistics or endangered animals, you are sure to find an infographic for it. If you, miraculously, aren’t able to recall any that you have seen, take a look at this list of the 10 best infographics of 2011 via Nowsourcing to catch up.
Infographics spice up ‘boring’ data

Infographics are useful because they turn historically lengthy and tedious bulks of data in to something that’s much more interesting: a visual.

As a society heading into the new decade, we want to read less and see more. While this doesn’t bode too well for book publishers, it’s opened a whole new creative area for designers.

An increasing number of companies and clients are recognizing the benefits of infographics and want their data jazzed up and dressed for the prom. They know that their assiduously compiled information has a far better chance of being read, appreciated, shared and widely circulated if it looks less like an annual report and more like the next big meme. And if you aren’t convinced yet, here’s an infographic on why you should use infographics.
You will need your existing skills. And more.

While the graphics used in infographics have become more eye-catching and sophisticated, they are not too different in purpose from the charts and graphs we used to make in high school. After all, the objective is still to present data in a more visually engaging and accessible way.

However, print and web designers are having a hard time transferring their existing skills to infographics because, as the many aspiring infographics designers will tell you, designing good infographics isn’t as simple as it looks. Sure, you still need the same essential aesthetic and technical skills but you should also be able to effectively translate data into visuals. Most importantly, you need to ensure that the infographic acts as an informative tool and not as a visual distraction.
The 7 rules of great infographic design…


They started out as a social media experiment and then suddenly everyone wanted a piece.

A couple years back, if you dropped the word ‘Infographic’ or ‘Dataviz’ in a conversation, you would have been greeted by a good number of confused looks even if you were among other web designers.

Today, so many infographics have gone viral that it’s practically impossible to ignore them. You’ll find them tweeted by your friends who want to share an interesting new find, promoted by companies eager to display their growth trends and utilized by even the White House for its progress reports.

No matter what you are searching for online, whether employment statistics or endangered animals, you are sure to find an infographic for it. If you, miraculously, aren’t able to recall any that you have seen, take a look at this list of the 10 best infographics of 2011 via Nowsourcing to catch up.

Infographics spice up ‘boring’ data

Infographics are useful because they turn historically lengthy and tedious bulks of data in to something that’s much more interesting: a visual.

As a society heading into the new decade, we want to read less and see more. While this doesn’t bode too well for book publishers, it’s opened a whole new creative area for designers.

An increasing number of companies and clients are recognizing the benefits of infographics and want their data jazzed up and dressed for the prom. They know that their assiduously compiled information has a far better chance of being read, appreciated, shared and widely circulated if it looks less like an annual report and more like the next big meme. And if you aren’t convinced yet, here’s an infographic on why you should use infographics.

You will need your existing skills. And more.

While the graphics used in infographics have become more eye-catching and sophisticated, they are not too different in purpose from the charts and graphs we used to make in high school. After all, the objective is still to present data in a more visually engaging and accessible way.

However, print and web designers are having a hard time transferring their existing skills to infographics because, as the many aspiring infographics designers will tell you, designing good infographics isn’t as simple as it looks. Sure, you still need the same essential aesthetic and technical skills but you should also be able to effectively translate data into visuals. Most importantly, you need to ensure that the infographic acts as an informative tool and not as a visual distraction. Leer más “Infographics: How to Strike the Elusive Balance between Data and Visualization”

White House joins Google+ to further engage with voters

It’s on all the other social networking sites so it was only a matter of time before it joined Google+. And on Friday it did—the White House now has an account with Google+ as it seeks to engage with more voters in the run up to November’s presidential election.

With the annual State of the Union address a matter of hours away and an election looming later this year, the White House has signed up to social networking newcomer Google+ in a bid to connect with even more voters.

The move to get the White House on Google+ was announced on the White House’s offical blog in a post on Friday. “On day one, President Obama made clear that this Administration is committed to public engagement and participation,” spokesperson Kori Schulman wrote in the post.

The Google+ page will offer up news from the blog, photos and videos from behind the scenes and give voters an opportunity to participate, Schulman said.

She continued, “We hope you’ll add your voice to the discussion and share the things you find interesting with people in your circles.”


Trevor Mogg
http://www.digitaltrends.com/social-media/white-house-joins-google-to-further-engage-with-voters/
BY 

It’s on all the other social networking sites so it was only a matter of time before it joined Google+. And on Friday it did—the White House now has an account with Google+ as it seeks to engage with more voters in the run up to November’s presidential election.

With the annual State of the Union address a matter of hours away and an election looming later this year, the White House has signed up to social networking newcomer Google+ in a bid to connect with even more voters.

The move to get the White House on Google+ was announced on the White House’s offical blog in a post on Friday. “On day one, President Obama made clear that this Administration is committed to public engagement and participation,” spokesperson Kori Schulman wrote in the post.

The Google+ page will offer up news from the blog, photos and videos from behind the scenes and give voters an opportunity to participate, Schulman said.

She continued, “We hope you’ll add your voice to the discussion and share the things you find interesting with people in your circles.” Leer más “White House joins Google+ to further engage with voters”

More Drama, Obama

It wasn’t until the end of President Barack Obama’s first full press conference in three months that a problem became clear.

In the last question of the hour-plus session in the East Room of the White House on Friday morning, Fox News correspondent Wendell Goler asked the president about the Islamic center being constructed near Ground Zero in lower Manhattan, requesting that Obama “weigh in” on the “wisdom” of establishing a “mosque” near the site of the 9/11 attack. (Goler balanced out the question with a reference to the would-be Koran-burning pastor.) Obama delivered a heartfelt, forceful, and extensive reply. He noted that a bedrock principle of the nation is that all men and women “can practice religion freely.” If you can build a church, a synagogue, a Hindu temple on a site, he said, then you should be able to build a mosque. “We’re not at war with Islam,” he proclaimed. Referring to US soldiers, he said, with his voice rising, “I’ve got Muslims fighting in the uniform of the armed services of the United States. They’re putting their lives on the line for us…They are Americans!” His point: Should they be denied the freedom to practice their religion?


— White House photo/Pete Souza

At his press conference, the president delivered an impassioned defense of religious freedom, but failed to get worked up about the No. 1 issue: the economy.

— By David Corn

It wasn’t until the end of President Barack Obama‘s first full press conference in three months that a problem became clear.

In the last question of the hour-plus session in the East Room of the White House on Friday morning, Fox News correspondent Wendell Goler asked the president about the Islamic center being constructed near Ground Zero in lower Manhattan, requesting that Obama “weigh in” on the “wisdom” of establishing a “mosque” near the site of the 9/11 attack. (Goler balanced out the question with a reference to the would-be Koran-burning pastor.) Obama delivered a heartfelt, forceful, and extensive reply. He noted that a bedrock principle of the nation is that all men and women “can practice religion freely.” If you can build a church, a synagogue, a Hindu temple on a site, he said, then you should be able to build a mosque. “We’re not at war with Islam,” he proclaimed. Referring to US soldiers, he said, with his voice rising, “I’ve got Muslims fighting in the uniform of the armed services of the United States. They’re putting their lives on the line for us…They are Americans!” His point: Should they be denied the freedom to practice their religion? Leer más “More Drama, Obama”

President Truman vs. MacArthur: President Obama vs. McChrystal?

Reading about General McChrystal’s lack of political smarts, I could not but think of the dustup between Truman and MacArthur. The issues were largely different, but in one sense, identical. In 1950–’51, the Korean war, though boldly begun, had degenerated into a bloody stalemate. General MacArthur wanted to carry the war to China, and made his passionate recommendations very public, against the stated policy of the President. MacArthur was the leading military figure of the nation. As Walter Karp has written…


Reading about General McChrystal’s lack of political smarts, I could not but think of the dustup between Truman and MacArthur. The issues were largely different, but in one sense, identical.  In 1950–’51, the Korean war, though boldly begun, had degenerated into a bloody stalemate.  General MacArthur wanted to carry the war to China, and made his passionate recommendations very public, against the stated policy of the President.  MacArthur was the leading military figure of the nation.  As Walter Karp has written… Leer más “President Truman vs. MacArthur: President Obama vs. McChrystal?”