Global Mobile Advertising Revenues Surge 82.8% in 2012 – thnxz to @iab


Mobile advertising revenue continues to be dominated by the search segment, which represented 52.8 percent of total global mobile advertising revenue, or $4.7 USD (€3.6 billion EURO) in 2012, $2.5 billion in 2011(€1.9 billion). Display advertising accounted for 38.7 percent and messaging 8.5 percent.

The share by region of the global figure of $8.9 billion (€6.9 billion) for 2012 is:

  • Asia-Pacific: 40.2% ($3,558 million/€2,769 million)
  • North America: 39.8% ($3,525 million/€2,743 million)
  • Western Europe: 16.9% ($1,499 million/€1,167 million)
  • Central Europe: 1.3% ($112 million/€87 million)
  • Middle East & Africa: 1.2% ($109 million/€85 million)
  • Latin America: 0.6% ($50 million/€39 million)

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Growth year-over-year was strong across the board, led by North America, which saw a 111 percent surge over 2011 figures. Western Europe also saw a major increase, 91 percent over the previous year. Other year-over-year upswings include:

  • Latin America: 71%
  • Central Europe: 69%
  • Middle-East and Africa: 68%
  • Asia-Pacific: 60%

“Mobile is coming into its own as a powerhouse advertising medium,” says Anna Bager, Vice President and General Manager, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, U.S. IAB. “Today’s advertising is happening in a world where ad campaigns can be planned and bought across global networks on multiple media, but the massive and continuing acceleration of mobile’s international impact provides new and exciting frontiers for content and communication.”

Full article? +INFO here!

Burning Ice: The Next Energy Boom?

For gas hydrates to be economically viable in the U.S., Johnson estimates that they would need a wholesale price of at least $9 per thousand standard cubic feet. That’s not likely anytime soon. The world currently uses about 117 trillion cubic feet of natural gas annually; U.S. consumption is a little over a quarter of that total.
Unless the current shale natural gas market completely collapses, in the short run, extracting gas hydrate is unlikely to be economically feasible in North America. But it offers advantages that make it worth developing.
“Relative to coal, methane gas produces only half the CO2 and no mercury, particulates, or ash,” said Johnson. “You might even be able to take CO2 produced from an [industrial] plant and sequester that CO2 for thousands of years, [with potential] tax credits for doing so.”
Couple its clean-burning potential with the fact that it’s so ubiquitous, and it’s arguably enough to give gas hydrate energy a hard second look. Some estimates put the global amount of gas hydrates at as much as 43,000 trillion cubic feet in sandstone reservoirs alone. Even if only half of that is recoverable, Johnson says that they could still represent a significant global energy reserve for well over a century.


(Gtranquillity/Shutterstock)
Burning Ice


miller-mccune.com
Methane hydrates present a potential lifeline to resource-poor nations like Japan, which already imports more than 90 percent of its fossil fuels.
By 

Oil companies and governments around the world are examining how to uncage huge amounts of methane gas locked up in undersea ice.  Set a lighter to an icy block ofmethane hydrate, a naturally frozen combo of methane gas and water, and flames spew forth at random. However unlikely this fluke of nature may appear — burning ice — it could hold the keys to a vast wealth of untapped, clean-burning methane gas thought to exist deep beneath the outer margins of most continental shelves.

Its contribution may be peripheral to the immediate needs of Western Europe and North America, currently drowning in cheap natural gas, but it present a potential lifeline to resource-poor nations like Japan, which already imports more than 90 percent of its fossil fuels. Although successfully created in the laboratory as early as the 1800s, gas hydrates were only discovered in nature in western Siberian permafrost in the late 1960s. And their structural vagaries, capable of trapping this frozen methane in molecular, lattice cages, are only now being fully appreciated under natural conditions. It is known, however, that these methane hydrates typically form only at low temperatures and under high pressure in rock sediments, usually hundreds of feet or more below the ocean surface. Leer más “Burning Ice: The Next Energy Boom?”

7 Ways To Get What You Want According to Napoleon

Napoleon Bonaparte needs no introduction. Widely regarded as the greatest general who ever lived, his exploits are almost the stuff of legend. Like many great people, he is a controversial figure, and some historians regard him as having set back the Economic progress of Europe by a generation, though others dispute this.

Clearly, Napoleon was a driven man who aggressively sought power and had a great sense of his own personal ability. Whatever we might think about Napoleon and his legacy, however, he enjoyed enormous success as he built his empire, and much of his thinking has application for us today as we go about the business of building our own lives.

‘A throne is only a bench covered with velvet.’

There is an old fable about an expert archer who could hit the bull’s-eye every time. However, when he entered a competition to win a silver cup, his arm trembled and he almost missed. When he played for a prize of gold coins, he trembled so much that his aim suffered and he lost the match.

A central tenet of Buddhism is that desire leads to suffering. When we desire something too much, we feel emotionally attached to it and our efforts to acquire it can be thwarted. Much of this desire comes from an unrealistic appraisal of the importance of things. Napoleon’s example can be applied to almost anything – when we see things as they really are and don’t give undue importance to surface appearances, we are more detached and so more free. Then, we are in a more powerful position to acquire what we choose.


Written by Mark Harrison | //pickthebrain.com/blog/

Napoleon Bonaparte needs no introduction. Widely regarded as the greatest general who ever lived, his exploits are almost the stuff of legend. Like many great people, he is a controversial figure, and some historians regard him as having set back the Economic progress of Europe by a generation, though others dispute this.

Clearly, Napoleon was a driven man who aggressively sought power and had a great sense of his own personal ability. Whatever we might think about Napoleon and his legacy, however, he enjoyed enormous success as he built his empire, and much of his thinking has application for us today as we go about the business of building our own lives.

‘A throne is only a bench covered with velvet.’

There is an old fable about an expert archer who could hit the bull’s-eye every time. However, when he entered a competition to win a silver cup, his arm trembled and he almost missed. When he played for a prize of gold coins, he trembled so much that his aim suffered and he lost the match.

A central tenet of Buddhism is that desire leads to suffering. When we desire something too much, we feel emotionally attached to it and our efforts to acquire it can be thwarted. Much of this desire comes from an unrealistic appraisal of the importance of things. Napoleon’s example can be applied to almost anything – when we see things as they really are and don’t give undue importance to surface appearances, we are more detached and so more free. Then, we are in a more powerful position to acquire what we choose. Leer más “7 Ways To Get What You Want According to Napoleon”

APAC to surpass North America as biggest ad market in 2014 : SMG, eMarketer

Digital marketing dollars is shifting significantly to developing countries like China and India due to the growing middle class. The two countries records the fastest-growing internet population in the world with 581.6 million users in 2010.

Some highlights by countries:

China will see an annual growth of 20 per cent throughout 2012 in online ad spend. This year already saw a total of US$3.8 billion which will rise to US$6.4 billion by 2012.

India is still developing in terms of media penetration. Only 51 per cent of the population owned a TV in 2008, 31 per cent had a mobile and 20.2 per cent went online monthly. The country is estimated to have 63.6 million internet users in 2010. While penetration is low, India remains the fifth-largest internet user population worldwide.

Unlike other markets, Japan is seeing a decline in media spend to an estimated US$43 billion in 2010. Digital spend has also dropped slightly to US$8.2 billion this year, but is expected to make a comeback over the next two years.


ASIA-PACIFIC – Starcom MediaVest Group (SMG) and eMarketer has issued a report forecasting Asia-Pacific will surpass North America to become the world’s biggest advertising market in 2014.

APAC to surpass North America as biggest ad market in 2014 : SMG, eMarketer

The Global Media Intelligence Report is a collection of data for six major regions, spanning 29 countries in total. It is led by Laura Desmond, global CEO of SMG, and Geoff Ramsey, CEO and co-founder of eMarketer.

The report looks at digital and total media advertising spend trends between 2009 to 2014. Excluding Japan and Australia, the Asia-Pacific region is currently trailing second after North America in media ad spend, but is expected to surpass the US with US$173.2 billion or 30.7 per cent of the world’s ad spend share in 2014, the report noted.

Asia-Pacific currently holds 28 per cent of the pie. Leer más “APAC to surpass North America as biggest ad market in 2014 : SMG, eMarketer”

In A ‘Luvvy’ Recovery, Digital Hits 28 Percent Of WPP Sales

Earlier this year, the world’s biggest advertising group said new media would make up two thirds of its income in three or four years.

Today it stands at 28 percent, WPP said, as it reported first-half-of-year pre-tax profit up 36 percent to £244 ($379.46) million, on three percent better revenue of £4.44 ($6.91) billion.

CEO Sir Martin Sorrell, over the last year, has cautiously refrained from embracing a 2010/11 upturn away from the recession.

But the latest WPP earnings statement does dare to say: “The results reflect the recovery in the world economy … “The group’s advertising businesses achieved a 180 degree turnaround from -4% in the first quarter to +4% in the second quarter … Traditional advertising has recovered sharply.”

“The expected LUV recovery – L-shaped in Western Europe, U-shaped in the United States and V-shaped in the BRICs and Next 11 – is now more LVV-shaped (LuVVy-shaped?), with the United States, in particular recovering much more strongly than anticipated.”


DAVOS/SWITZERLAND, 27JAN07 - Sir Martin Sorrel...
Image via Wikipedia

Earlier this year, the world’s biggest advertising group said new media would make up two thirds of its income in three or four years.

Today it stands at 28 percent, WPP said, as it reported first-half-of-year pre-tax profit up 36 percent to £244 ($379.46) million, on three percent better revenue of £4.44 ($6.91) billion.

CEO Sir Martin Sorrell, over the last year, has cautiously refrained from embracing a 2010/11 upturn away from the recession.

But the latest WPP earnings statement does dare to say: “The results reflect the recovery in the world economy … “The group’s advertising businesses achieved a 180 degree turnaround from -4% in the first quarter to +4% in the second quarter … Traditional advertising has recovered sharply.”

“The expected LUV recovery – L-shaped in Western Europe, U-shaped in the United States and V-shaped in the BRICs and Next 11 – is now more LVV-shaped (LuVVy-shaped?), with the United States, in particular recovering much more strongly than anticipated.” Leer más “In A ‘Luvvy’ Recovery, Digital Hits 28 Percent Of WPP Sales”

Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer

By Cameron Chapman

Web design is often an appealing career choice for artistic and creative people. It’s seen as a potentially lucrative opportunity to be creative on a daily basis. But there are drawbacks that many people don’t realize going into the field.

While most of these wouldn’t deter people who really want to be designers and who know what design is really about, they might deter people who are only looking for a job that allows them to be artistic or creative. Even if they’re not a deterrent, they should at least serve as an eye-opener for anyone looking to become a Web designer.

Competition Is Fierce

Competition in Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer

Ten to fifteen years ago, Web design was a fairly specialized field. Most designers had either taught themselves by trial and error or gone to one of the few colleges out there that ran a decent Web or multimedia design program. Now, enough resources are online and in print that virtually anyone can teach themselves to design websites; and if they have an eye for what works and what doesn’t, these people can often design websites that are as good as those who spent four years getting a degree.


By Cameron Chapman

Web design is often an appealing career choice for artistic and creative people. It’s seen as a potentially lucrative opportunity to be creative on a daily basis. But there are drawbacks that many people don’t realize going into the field.

While most of these wouldn’t deter people who really want to be designers and who know what design is really about, they might deter people who are only looking for a job that allows them to be artistic or creative. Even if they’re not a deterrent, they should at least serve as an eye-opener for anyone looking to become a Web designer.

Competition Is Fierce

Competition in Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer

Ten to fifteen years ago, Web design was a fairly specialized field. Most designers had either taught themselves by trial and error or gone to one of the few colleges out there that ran a decent Web or multimedia design program. Now, enough resources are online and in print that virtually anyone can teach themselves to design websites; and if they have an eye for what works and what doesn’t, these people can often design websites that are as good as those who spent four years getting a degree. Leer más “Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer”

Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer

Web design is often an appealing career choice for artistic and creative people. It’s seen as a potentially lucrative opportunity to be creative on a daily basis. But there are drawbacks that many people don’t realize going into the field.

While most of these wouldn’t deter people who really want to be designers and who know what design is really about, they might deter people who are only looking for a job that allows them to be artistic or creative. Even if they’re not a deterrent, they should at least serve as an eye-opener for anyone looking to become a Web designer.

Competition Is Fierce

Competition in Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer

Ten to fifteen years ago, Web design was a fairly specialized field. Most designers had either taught themselves by trial and error or gone to one of the few colleges out there that ran a decent Web or multimedia design program. Now, enough resources are online and in print that virtually anyone can teach themselves to design websites; and if they have an eye for what works and what doesn’t, these people can often design websites that are as good as those who spent four years getting a degree.

There’s also competition from the thousands of free templates and website builders out there. Small companies often opt to use a stock template for their website rather than pay a designer, or they’ll use a WYSIWYG editor to create a website that, while not as good as a professionally designed website, is perfectly acceptable to their visitors and customers.

Design firms in developing countries are now able to produce professional websites for a fraction of the cost of designers in Western Europe, the US, Canada and other developed countries. While not all of these firms can compete on quality, more and more are cropping up every day that can—and that can also compete on development speed and cost.

Designers have to differentiate themselves now more than ever to get a steady stream of business. Freelance designers, especially, can’t get by on “decent” or “good” anymore. They need to be excellent in order to land the clients they need to support themselves and their companies. Even in-house designers are facing more competition, from both larger applicant pools and outsourcing.


By Cameron Chapman

Web design is often an appealing career choice for artistic and creative people. It’s seen as a potentially lucrative opportunity to be creative on a daily basis. But there are drawbacks that many people don’t realize going into the field.

While most of these wouldn’t deter people who really want to be designers and who know what design is really about, they might deter people who are only looking for a job that allows them to be artistic or creative. Even if they’re not a deterrent, they should at least serve as an eye-opener for anyone looking to become a Web designer.

Competition Is Fierce

Competition in Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer

Ten to fifteen years ago, Web design was a fairly specialized field. Most designers had either taught themselves by trial and error or gone to one of the few colleges out there that ran a decent Web or multimedia design program. Now, enough resources are online and in print that virtually anyone can teach themselves to design websites; and if they have an eye for what works and what doesn’t, these people can often design websites that are as good as those who spent four years getting a degree.

There’s also competition from the thousands of free templates and website builders out there. Small companies often opt to use a stock template for their website rather than pay a designer, or they’ll use a WYSIWYG editor to create a website that, while not as good as a professionally designed website, is perfectly acceptable to their visitors and customers.

Design firms in developing countries are now able to produce professional websites for a fraction of the cost of designers in Western Europe, the US, Canada and other developed countries. While not all of these firms can compete on quality, more and more are cropping up every day that can—and that can also compete on development speed and cost.

Designers have to differentiate themselves now more than ever to get a steady stream of business. Freelance designers, especially, can’t get by on “decent” or “good” anymore. They need to be excellent in order to land the clients they need to support themselves and their companies. Even in-house designers are facing more competition, from both larger applicant pools and outsourcing. Leer más “Some Reasons You Might Not Want To Become A Web Designer”

Infographic of the Day: Does the U.S. Waste Money on Innovation?

This infographic by accounting firm Grant Thorton purports to show how efficient 30 different countries are at innovation. How? Simply by showing the ratio between patents granted in a country, and the total R&D expenditures there.

Thus, the bigger the box in each country, the more innovation (as measured by patents) it gets for every R&D dollar:

So for the U.S. it looks really, really bad. Even though we grant more patents than any other country in the world, we also seem to simply throw money at the problem of innovation–and in the long run, that can’t be good for our own economic competitiveness.


This infographic by accounting firm Grant Thorton purports to show how efficient 30 different countries are at innovation. How? Simply by showing the ratio between patents granted in a country, and the total R&D expenditures there.

Thus, the bigger the box in each country, the more innovation (as measured by patents) it gets for every R&D dollar:


[Click for larger version]

So for the U.S. it looks really, really bad. Even though we grant more patents than any other country in the world, we also seem to simply throw money at the problem of innovation–and in the long run, that can’t be good for our own economic competitiveness. Leer más “Infographic of the Day: Does the U.S. Waste Money on Innovation?”

The Reason Behind the Success of Reverse Innovation

The road to reverse innovation

In his article What is Reverse Innovation, Vijay Govindarajan outlines the following historical phases:

1. Globalization: companies designing and manufacturing in developed markets products that are “de-featured” for export to emerging markets that can’t afford the fully featured original product.
2. Glocalization: companies still de-featuring products from developed markets but now localizing production in emerging markets to take advantage of lower labor costs.
3. Local innovation: companies now designing in emerging markets products that are directly suited to the local needs. (Manufacturing continues to take place locally for costs reasons.)
4. Reverse innovation: companies designing and manufacturing in emerging markets for local use AND export to the developed markets (with or without some level of scaling-up).


by Yann Cramer

The Rise of SimplicityThanks to a number of spectacular successes obtained by blue-chip companies in recent years, Reverse Innovation is becoming a popular trend. Examples include GE’s portable ultra-sound equipment designed in China and sold worldwide, LG’s low cost air conditioner designed in India and sold worldwide, Renault’s Logan low-cost model designed for Eastern European markets and now selling on Western Europe, etc.

In an enlightening article, Vijay Govindarajan outlines a historical perspective from globalisation to reverse innovation, and highlights the key driver behind this evolution: the revenue gap between developed and emerging markets. But there are other drivers that may be less visible but no less powerful.

The road to reverse innovation

In his article What is Reverse Innovation, Vijay Govindarajan outlines the following historical phases:

  1. Globalization: companies designing and manufacturing in developed markets products that are “de-featured” for export to emerging markets that can’t afford the fully featured original product.
  2. Glocalization: companies still de-featuring products from developed markets but now localizing production in emerging markets to take advantage of lower labor costs.
  3. Local innovation: companies now designing in emerging markets products that are directly suited to the local needs. (Manufacturing continues to take place locally for costs reasons.)
  4. Reverse innovation: companies designing and manufacturing in emerging markets for local use AND export to the developed markets (with or without some level of scaling-up). Leer más “The Reason Behind the Success of Reverse Innovation”