Your website and the user experience

This world has now turned into a global village. Internet is being used all over the world and this is exactly why each and every brand wants to have their own website in order to promote their business and brand. Websites are considered to be a true representation of any company so one should provide special attention to all the major and minor details of a website. If you have manages to create a website which is user friendly, you have made a great website.

After all, the websites are developed for the users and they are not interested in knowing how and when it was developed. They just want a smooth running throughout the website. If your website is a combination of good branding, usability, functionality and a great content, you will have a happy user on the other side of computer. If not, you have lost yet another visitor who will never visit your website again because for him the navigation is not as simple as it should have been.

The user’s experience of your website will help a user perceive things about your brand as well. If your site if sufficient enough to provide them with the necessary information, they will have a good impression of your website. If not, you will just end up with a frustrating user. Since a lot depends on user’s mood as well, the thoughts of the users can be subjective but while designing a website, you should keep in mind a few basic points which can help user with an easy navigation. If you follow some set trends and best practices, you can definitely avoid having frustrated customers. Since call-to-action websites have become way too important, all designers and developers pay special attention while designing and developing a website.

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http://www.smashingbuzz.com/2011/01/your-website-and-the-user-experience/

This world has now turned into a global village. Internet is being used all over the world and this is exactly why each and every brand wants to have their own website in order to promote their business and brand. Websites are considered to be a true representation of any company so one should provide special attention to all the major and minor details of a website. If you have manages to create a website which is user friendly, you have made a great website.

After all, the websites are developed for the users and they are not interested in knowing how and when it was developed. They just want a smooth running throughout the website. If your website is a combination of good branding, usability, functionality and a great content, you will have a happy user on the other side of computer. If not, you have lost yet another visitor who will never visit your website again because for him the navigation is not as simple as it should have been.

The user’s experience of your website will help a user perceive things about your brand as well. If your site if sufficient enough to provide them with the necessary information, they will have a good impression of your website. If not, you will just end up with a frustrating user. Since a lot depends on user’s mood as well, the thoughts of the users can be subjective but while designing a website, you should keep in mind a few basic points which can help user with an easy navigation. If you follow some set trends and best practices, you can definitely avoid having frustrated customers. Since call-to-action websites have become way too important, all designers and developers pay special attention while designing and developing a website.

Following are a few things that designers and developers should keep in mind while developing a website so that they can save customers from useless frustrations…: Leer más “Your website and the user experience”

The Inverted Pyramid Of Visual Design

The idea is that the critical information is presented immediately and then additional information is presented that expands on, explains, and reinforces the main idea.

At any point someone should be able to stop reading without missing the main message. Those who read more get more, but everyone gets the main idea you’re trying to communicate.

The main benefits of the inverted pyramid are:

* It quickly conveys key information
* It establishes a context in which to interpret subsequent information
* It’s initial chunks of information are more likely to be remembered later
* It allows for efficient scanning and searching
* It can be easily edited since least important information is presented last

The above could equally be goals of a good design. We want our designs to quickly communicate important information, be remembered, and establish context, don’t we?

The cons of the inverted pyramid are:

* Doesn’t allow flexibility of building suspense or creating surprise ending
* Can lead to perception of being uninteresting

Whenever it’s important to present information efficiently and quickly, the inverted pyramid is an excellent style to follow. Your lead (opening paragraph) becomes a concise overview of whatever it is you’re writing and you can follow the lead with more detailed chunks of information for those that want to know more.


In one second the user should understand generally where they are
—largely driven by visuals and functionality.
If we can keep people for 10 seconds, they should understand our primary message.
If they stay for two minutes, some secondary messages should be getting through.
All this feeds into a call to action.
Kristina Halvorson

Journalists use the inverted pyramid style of writing to quickly convey the most important information of a story to readers. It works because no matter how far into an article someone reads the most important information gets through.

The more you read the more detailed information you get, but no matter where you stop reading the main message has been conveyed. Can web designers do something similar visually?

The inverted pyramid of journalism Leer más “The Inverted Pyramid Of Visual Design”

Usability Resources to Win Arguments

Today’s post is a big one and it’s most definitely one for your bookmarks menu, because from time to time when speaking with clients it becomes necessary to have material to backup the statements which you are making.

Sometimes clients will suggest things such as forcing all users to register with a six page long form before they can even access the site. They aren’t web professionals, it’s not their fault for not knowing that this isn’t a good idea from a usability perspective.

If you’re going to convince them that this is a bad idea, however, then you’re going to need some rock solid material to back that up. While an element of trust is always important to a working relationship, you have to respect that sometimes clients will just need to see the facts in front of them to fully understand that what you’re saying is correct.

So, what we’ve done for you today is compiled a list of some of the biggest, most compelling usability articles which address common issues. Hopefully this should help you during tough conversations about what does and doesn’t work on a a website.

Bookmark this post, come back to it, use it in meetings and educate your clients on the things which work for other websites, so that they might also work for them.


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http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2010/10/usability-resources-to-win-arguments/

This post was authored exclusively for WDD by John O’Nolan, a core contributor to the WordPress UI Team, writer and entrepreneur based in Surrey in the United Kingdom. John loves to talk to people, so why not follow @JohnONolan on twitter too?
Today’s post is a big one and it’s most definitely one for your bookmarks menu, because from time to time when speaking with clients it becomes necessary to have material to backup the statements which you are making.

Sometimes clients will suggest things such as forcing all users to register with a six page long form before they can even access the site. They aren’t web professionals, it’s not their fault for not knowing that this isn’t a good idea from a usability perspective.

If you’re going to convince them that this is a bad idea, however, then you’re going to need some rock solid material to back that up. While an element of trust is always important to a working relationship, you have to respect that sometimes clients will just need to see the facts in front of them to fully understand that what you’re saying is correct.

So, what we’ve done for you today is compiled a list of some of the biggest, most compelling usability articles which address common issues. Hopefully this should help you during tough conversations about what does and doesn’t work on a a website.

Bookmark this post, come back to it, use it in meetings and educate your clients on the things which work for other websites, so that they might also work for them.

How Not Forcing Users to Register Increased Sales by $300million

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A truly fascinating article covering how one ecommerce site removed forced user-registration during the checkout process, with a result of a $300million increase in revenue. Very impressive.

 

10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines

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  • Form labels work best above the field
  • Users focus on faces
  • Quality of design is an indicator of credibility
  • Most users do know how to scroll
  • Blue is the best color for links
  • The ideal search box is 27 characters wide
  • White space improves comprehension
  • Effective user testing doesn’t have to be extensive
  • Informative product pages stand out
  • Most users are blind to advertising

Leer más “Usability Resources to Win Arguments”

Best Practices for Designing Usable Websites for Kids

Designing for young kids is something not a lot of designers think about until approached by a client who wants to target that age group.

But the truth is that kids in the 3-12 age group are using the Internet in surprising numbers. Ten years ago, it was rare for a child who hadn’t even yet reached school-age to use a computer. Now, there are a surprising number of websites specifically catering to them. And that number is growing all the time.

The Nielsen Norman Group, long known for their usability studies, has recently completed a study on the Internet habits and related usability issues often encountered by kids in the 3-12 age group.

The report is based on actual user studies, rather than just surveys asking kids what their internet habits and experiences are, and provide invaluable insight into the real usability issues confronting kids, and what users can do about it.

Below is just a brief sampling of some of the topics covered in the report and the study. The report can be purchased and downloaded from the NN/G website.


//www.webdesignerdepot.com | Written exclusively for WDD by Cameron Chapman.

Designing for young kids is something not a lot of designers think about until approached by a client who wants to target that age group.

But the truth is that kids in the 3-12 age group are using the Internet in surprising numbers. Ten years ago, it was rare for a child who hadn’t even yet reached school-age to use a computer. Now, there are a surprising number of websites specifically catering to them. And that number is growing all the time.

The Nielsen Norman Group, long known for their usability studies, has recently completed a study on the Internet habits and related usability issues often encountered by kids in the 3-12 age group.

The report is based on actual user studies, rather than just surveys asking kids what their internet habits and experiences are, and provide invaluable insight into the real usability issues confronting kids, and what users can do about it.

Below is just a brief sampling of some of the topics covered in the report and the study. The report can be purchased and downloaded from the NN/G website.

Myth: Kids Have Cutting-Edge Technology

A lot of us tend to believe that kids have access to cutting-edge technology. They have the newest computers, cell phones, and other gadgets at their disposal. While this may be more common among teenagers, younger kids often have outdated computers.

If you think about it for a minute, it makes sense. Kids in elementary school often aren’t as dependent on computers for schoolwork, and therefore parents often give them hand-me-downs (either their own or from an older sibling) or less expensive machines. This not only means that kids often have computers with slower processors, but may also be more limited in internet connection speeds.

Even the computers kids use at school are often older and outdated. School computers are often donated and budgets for new technology are often very limited. School computer labs may hang on to the same computers for five years or more due to budgetary restrictions. And often these computers aren’t particularly cutting-edge when they’re purchased.

Myth: Kids Understand the Technology They Use

A lot of adults look at kids using computers and assume they understand how they work. After all, a lot of these kids have grown up using computers and it seems like second-nature for many of them.

The truth is that just because kids know how to use something doesn’t mean they have any clue how it actually does what it does:

Like most adults who don’t understand how a refrigerator works, kids do not feel they need to understand the underlying mechanisms of the Web before using it.

Because of this, it’s important that designers don’t overestimate the knowledge of their visitors. It becomes more important as a user’s age decreases, as they have less experience in how technology generally works.

Leer más “Best Practices for Designing Usable Websites for Kids”