Learning PHP: Get Started Using PHP

This PHP tutorial will guide you through the process of learning and using PHP, preparing you with some fundamental knowledge to get you started in the right path. We will talk about the history of PHP, create a local development environment (so that you won’t need a web server) and create a basic PHP script while discussing common beginner PHP gotchas along the way.
Introduction

In the beginning, there was nothing. Well, there were static web pages that had to be edited manually. That was a pain. And it didn’t do anything other than display text and images on a web page.

With the introduction of PHP/FI (Personal Homepage Tools) in 1995, everything changed. It became possible to create dynamic web applications that generated content on-the-fly and allowed users to interact with the once static web pages.

When Rasmus Lerdorf, the creator of PHP/FI, decided to release the source code of his project, the development went even faster.

Andi Gutmans and Zeev Suraski joined the project in 1997 and started working on PHP 3.0 as the official successor of PHP/FI. The development of PHP/FI was mostly halted. PHP 3.0 (which is a recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) was officially released in June 1998.

Shortly after the release, Andi and Zeev were already working on a rewrite of PHP’s core. It was finished in mid-1999 and the new engine, dubbed Zend Engine (comprised of parts of their first names, Zeev and Andi), was a huge success.

PHP 4.0, based on the new Zend engine, was officially released in May 2000.

After four long years, PHP 5.0 was released introducing a new object model and dozens of other new features. In 2010, PHP 5.3.1 is the latest stable release.

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by Elias Zerrouq

Learning PHP: Get Started Using PHP

This PHP tutorial will guide you through the process of learning and using PHP, preparing you with some fundamental knowledge to get you started in the right path. We will talk about the history of PHP, create a local development environment (so that you won’t need a web server) and create a basic PHP script while discussing common beginner PHP gotchas along the way.

Introduction

In the beginning, there was nothing. Well, there were static web pages that had to be edited manually. That was a pain. And it didn’t do anything other than display text and images on a web page.

With the introduction of PHP/FI (Personal Homepage Tools) in 1995, everything changed. It became possible to create dynamic web applications that generated content on-the-fly and allowed users to interact with the once static web pages.

When Rasmus Lerdorf, the creator of PHP/FI, decided to release the source code of his project, the development went even faster.

Andi Gutmans and Zeev Suraski joined the project in 1997 and started working on PHP 3.0 as the official successor of PHP/FI. The development of PHP/FI was mostly halted. PHP 3.0 (which is a recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) was officially released in June 1998.

Shortly after the release, Andi and Zeev were already working on a rewrite of PHP’s core. It was finished in mid-1999 and the new engine, dubbed Zend Engine (comprised of parts of their first names, Zeev and Andi), was a huge success.

PHP 4.0, based on the new Zend engine, was officially released in May 2000.

After four long years, PHP 5.0 was released introducing a new object model and dozens of other new features. In 2010, PHP 5.3.1 is the latest stable release. Leer más “Learning PHP: Get Started Using PHP”

WordPress Fat-Loss Diet to Speed Up & Ease Load

Last week we looked at some useful plugins to enhance and protect WordPress, following on with the WordPress topic let’s look at how you can tweak your WordPress install to increase the speed of your site and ease the load on your web servers. We’ll be putting the front end code on a strict diet, while trimming the fat from the database to produce a fast, lean website that doesn’t clog up your server’s resources.

Despite its general awesomeness and wide adoption across the web as both a blogging platform and a trusty CMS, it’s no secret that WordPress is a greedy old memory hog. This high memory usage soon becomes apparent when your blog receives a decent number of visitors and your blog goes missing due to your server throwing in the towel.

Installing one of the many caching plugins fixes 90% of these server problems, while upgrading your server specs solves the rest. But it’s not all about uptime and downtime, we also want a speedy site that loads in a flash every day. Follow this 10 step exercise regime for your blog and you’ll take it from a slobbering podgy couch potato to a ripped and finely tuned pentathlon athlete.


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Last week we looked at some useful plugins to enhance and protect WordPress, following on with the WordPress topic let’s look at how you can tweak your WordPress install to increase the speed of your site and ease the load on your web servers. We’ll be putting the front end code on a strict diet, while trimming the fat from the database to produce a fast, lean website that doesn’t clog up your server’s resources.

Despite its general awesomeness and wide adoption across the web as both a blogging platform and a trusty CMS, it’s no secret that WordPress is a greedy old memory hog. This high memory usage soon becomes apparent when your blog receives a decent number of visitors and your blog goes missing due to your server throwing in the towel.

Installing one of the many caching plugins fixes 90% of these server problems, while upgrading your server specs solves the rest. But it’s not all about uptime and downtime, we also want a speedy site that loads in a flash every day. Follow this 10 step exercise regime for your blog and you’ll take it from a slobbering podgy couch potato to a ripped and finely tuned pentathlon athlete. Leer más “WordPress Fat-Loss Diet to Speed Up & Ease Load”

24 tips for web developers

by ian

I’ve neglected the development folks lately. Which is ironic, since I’ve spent the last six weeks buried in reverse proxies via nginx, Nutch and writing web spiders in Python.

To make up for it, here’s a list of random learnings I’ve had when I put on my development hat:

1. Learn the business case. Make sure you understand the purpose of the application you’re writing. It’ll help you make informed decisions on features and such.
2. Fight for simplicity. Once you know the business case, you can work with your client to keep the application simple. So do it.
3. A stupid specification doesn’t justify a stupid application. If you know the spec makes no sense, then work with folks to fix it. Don’t write crappy code based on the crappy spec and expect sympathy later on.
4. You’re an architect, not a hammer. In the same vein as #3.
5. Plan twice, write once. Oh. My. God. Before you write a loop within a loop within a loop, think! There’s probably a better way. Small changes in architecture can make life a hell of a lot easier.
6. Plan for scalability. When your client says “Oh, this will never need to handle more than 1000 records” they are lying. Always plan for ginormous scaling. Write your code so that it can someday run on a platform like Amazon EC2, at least.


example of Python language
Image via Wikipedia

I’ve neglected the development folks lately. Which is ironic, since I’ve spent the last six weeks buried in reverse proxies via nginx, Nutch and writing web spiders in Python.

To make up for it, here’s a list of random learnings I’ve had when I put on my development hat:

  1. Learn the business case. Make sure you understand the purpose of the application you’re writing. It’ll help you make informed decisions on features and such.
  2. Fight for simplicity. Once you know the business case, you can work with your client to keep the application simple. So do it.
  3. A stupid specification doesn’t justify a stupid application. If you know the spec makes no sense, then work with folks to fix it. Don’t write crappy code based on the crappy spec and expect sympathy later on.
  4. You’re an architect, not a hammer. In the same vein as #3.
  5. Plan twice, write once. Oh. My. God. Before you write a loop within a loop within a loop, think! There’s probably a better way. Small changes in architecture can make life a hell of a lot easier.
  6. Plan for scalability. When your client says “Oh, this will never need to handle more than 1000 records” they are lying. Always plan for ginormous scaling. Write your code so that it can someday run on a platform like Amazon EC2, at least. Leer más “24 tips for web developers”

Website Monitoring And Testing: How To Monitor And Test Your Web Site Performance

Has your web server enough bandwidth to meet your readers requests? Would you know if your hosting provider is a bit sloppy and if it lets your site become inaccessible to the public, even if only for a few minutes? How do you find out if your web pages load fast enough now that Google places ranking value also on page load times? Monitoring and testing your website is a serious matter for any professional web publisher, big or small. Just like you keep under tabs your car oil and fuel levels to avoid frustrating problems, in the same way you need to keep under check your own web site and of all the specific performance, load and speed indicators which can indicate whether your site is performing and serving your content in the best and most efficient way or not.

In this guide, MasterNewMedia tech director Drazen Dobrovodski, explores most underrated aspects of website monitoring and testing.

Find out how to troubleshoot potential web site performance threats such as bandwidth loss, potential server downtimes, or sudden web traffic drops.

These below, the specific website monitoring and testing topics covered in this MasterNewMedia guide:

* Web server availability
* Web site performance testing
* Web site speed monitoring
* Google Webmaster Tools
* JavaScript-based web site monitoring tools
* Log file analyzers
* Image hotlinking
* How to use the robots.txt file
* RSS feeds serving
* Geographic web site testing
* Real-time web site traffic monitoring

This guide can be read and understood by non-technical people, and it is in fact prepared for those who need to coordinate website supervision tasks as well as for those who will actually perform them.

If you want to find out how to best test and monitor your web site performance, speed and reliability, this MasterNewMedia guide has all of what you need to know.


Has your web server enough bandwidth to meet your readers requests? Would you know if your hosting provider is a bit sloppy and if it lets your site become inaccessible to the public, even if only for a few minutes? How do you find out if your web pages load fast enough now that Google places ranking value also on page load times? Monitoring and testing your website is a serious matter for any professional web publisher, big or small.
Photo credit: alexsl

Just like you keep under tabs your car oil and fuel levels to avoid frustrating problems, in the same way you need to keep under check your own web site and of all the specific performance, load and speed indicators which can indicate whether your site is performing and serving your content in the best and most efficient way or not.

In this guide, MasterNewMedia tech director Drazen Dobrovodski, explores most underrated aspects of website monitoring and testing.

Find out how to troubleshoot potential web site performance threats such as bandwidth loss, potential server downtimes, or sudden web traffic drops.

These below, the specific website monitoring and testing topics covered in this MasterNewMedia guide:

  • Web server availability
  • Web site performance testing
  • Web site speed monitoring
  • Google Webmaster Tools
  • JavaScript-based web site monitoring tools
  • Log file analyzers
  • Image hotlinking
  • How to use the robots.txt file
  • RSS feeds serving
  • Geographic web site testing
  • Real-time web site traffic monitoring

This guide can be read and understood by non-technical people, and it is in fact prepared for those who need to coordinate website supervision tasks as well as for those who will actually perform them.

If you want to find out how to best test and monitor your web site performance, speed and reliability, this MasterNewMedia guide has all of what you need to know. Leer más “Website Monitoring And Testing: How To Monitor And Test Your Web Site Performance”