Fotografías de la Primera Guerra Mundial en 3D


La gente de A Nerds World — quienes descubrieron la cámara — crearon unos GIF animados que nos permiten darnos una idea de una de las guerras más terribles de la humanidad.


world-war-1-camera[1]

Vía http://anerdsworld.com & fayerwayer.com
Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers every time I place a glass slide into the 3D stereo viewer. Only at A Nerd’s World 986 Bathurst street can you see the 3D stereo camera, viewer, and actual World War I slides in person – leaving you with an experience you’ll never forget.

 

L.U.C 39/89


just4inspiration

The project “To Understand Poland 39-89″ is a concept album by the Polish composer, songwriter, activist, and producer Łukasz Rostowski, aka L.U.C. The record is delineated by two very important dates: the year of the outbreak of World War II, and the collapse of totalitarian political systems.

Source: L.U.C 39/89 

The Soldier and the Creativity Training

I knew I was in trouble the moment he smiled.

All I could see were four metal teeth — the front ones — the ones people use to bite things. Like an apple. Or the head of an outside consultant teaching a class on creativity to 24 managers at AT&T.

His nametag said “John Andrews,” but when it was his turn to introduce himself, it was “Master Staff Sergeant John Andrews, Fourth Battalion.”

Apparently, the man was still fighting the Vietnam war — and, by the look in his eye, it was clear he couldn’t quite tell what side I was on.

Unlike the other participants, John was wearing a suit and a tie — a tie tied so tight it seemed as if the veins in his neck would explode.

With great respect, I invited John to remove his tie, explaining that relaxation was one of the pre-conditions for creativity.

John declined.

The man was not the first tough cookie I’d encountered in my tour of corporate America. It came with the territory. Over the years, I’d learned to embrace this kind of moment. John was not the enemy. He was not a problem. He was simply someone I would need to be aware of as the session unfolded.

John was probably the same with me as he was with his wife, children, dog, and dry cleaner. He was, quite simply, a master at making people uncomfortable.


http://www.ideachampions.com/weblogs/archives/2010/10/the_man_with_th_1.shtml

US-soldier_0.jpg

I knew I was in trouble the moment he smiled.

All I could see were four metal teeth — the front ones — the ones people use to bite things. Like an apple. Or the head of an outside consultant teaching a class on creativity to 24 managers at AT&T.

His nametag said “John Andrews,” but when it was his turn to introduce himself, it was “Master Staff Sergeant John Andrews, Fourth Battalion.”

Apparently, the man was still fighting the Vietnam war — and, by the look in his eye, it was clear he couldn’t quite tell what side I was on.

Unlike the other participants, John was wearing a suit and a tie — a tie tied so tight it seemed as if the veins in his neck would explode.

With great respect, I invited John to remove his tie, explaining that relaxation was one of the pre-conditions for creativity.

John declined.

The man was not the first tough cookie I’d encountered in my tour of corporate America. It came with the territory. Over the years, I’d learned to embrace this kind of moment. John was not the enemy. He was not a problem. He was simply someone I would need to be aware of as the session unfolded.

John was probably the same with me as he was with his wife, children, dog, and dry cleaner. He was, quite simply, a master at making people uncomfortable. Leer más “The Soldier and the Creativity Training”

7 Ways To Get What You Want According to Napoleon

Napoleon Bonaparte needs no introduction. Widely regarded as the greatest general who ever lived, his exploits are almost the stuff of legend. Like many great people, he is a controversial figure, and some historians regard him as having set back the Economic progress of Europe by a generation, though others dispute this.

Clearly, Napoleon was a driven man who aggressively sought power and had a great sense of his own personal ability. Whatever we might think about Napoleon and his legacy, however, he enjoyed enormous success as he built his empire, and much of his thinking has application for us today as we go about the business of building our own lives.

‘A throne is only a bench covered with velvet.’

There is an old fable about an expert archer who could hit the bull’s-eye every time. However, when he entered a competition to win a silver cup, his arm trembled and he almost missed. When he played for a prize of gold coins, he trembled so much that his aim suffered and he lost the match.

A central tenet of Buddhism is that desire leads to suffering. When we desire something too much, we feel emotionally attached to it and our efforts to acquire it can be thwarted. Much of this desire comes from an unrealistic appraisal of the importance of things. Napoleon’s example can be applied to almost anything – when we see things as they really are and don’t give undue importance to surface appearances, we are more detached and so more free. Then, we are in a more powerful position to acquire what we choose.


Written by Mark Harrison | //pickthebrain.com/blog/

Napoleon Bonaparte needs no introduction. Widely regarded as the greatest general who ever lived, his exploits are almost the stuff of legend. Like many great people, he is a controversial figure, and some historians regard him as having set back the Economic progress of Europe by a generation, though others dispute this.

Clearly, Napoleon was a driven man who aggressively sought power and had a great sense of his own personal ability. Whatever we might think about Napoleon and his legacy, however, he enjoyed enormous success as he built his empire, and much of his thinking has application for us today as we go about the business of building our own lives.

‘A throne is only a bench covered with velvet.’

There is an old fable about an expert archer who could hit the bull’s-eye every time. However, when he entered a competition to win a silver cup, his arm trembled and he almost missed. When he played for a prize of gold coins, he trembled so much that his aim suffered and he lost the match.

A central tenet of Buddhism is that desire leads to suffering. When we desire something too much, we feel emotionally attached to it and our efforts to acquire it can be thwarted. Much of this desire comes from an unrealistic appraisal of the importance of things. Napoleon’s example can be applied to almost anything – when we see things as they really are and don’t give undue importance to surface appearances, we are more detached and so more free. Then, we are in a more powerful position to acquire what we choose. Leer más “7 Ways To Get What You Want According to Napoleon”