NFC Technology What is it… | qrcodepress.com


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Near field communication (NFC) technology embodies a set of standards for smart phones and other mobile devices that establish communications between such devices using radio frequencies.NFC Technology and Smartposter These transmissions can only be facilitated over short distances, hence the name of the technology. Typically, devices must either be touching or within an inch of one another in order to interface through NFC, but these devices do not require wires of any sort. NFC technology is an effective means of data transmission, especially in the commerce field.

Radio frequency identification (RFID) first emerged in 1983. NFC technology was developed as an offshoot of RFID, but did not garner any significant attention until 2004, when Nokia, Philips, and Sony founded the NFC Forum, a conglomerate that aims to promote the standardized use of the technology. Nokia was the first company to produce an NFC-enabled phone in 2006, thus drawing a significant amount of consumers attention to the technology. In recent years, NFC technology has become the cornerstone of mobile commerce.

Mobile commerce relies heavily on NFC technology. The technology enables smart phones and similar mobile devices to serve as mobile payment platforms, which can be used by consumers to make purchases of goods and services. Only mobile devices that are equipped with NFC chips can participate in mobile commerce. Typically, the financial information of a consumer is stored within this chip, or the mobile device itself. This information is then accessed to make transactions. By itself, NFC technology cannot initiate mobile transactions. Thus, mobile applications, often called mobile wallets, are needed to facilitate these payments. Leer más “NFC Technology What is it… | qrcodepress.com”

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Microsoft Enters Google’s Unwalled Garden

In late 2009, when Microsoft introduced a downloadable application for the iPhone from Apple, it set off some excitement in the tech world. For years, Microsoft and Apple had been head-to-head in the war for personal computing.

On Monday, the tech world was buzzing again with an announcement by Microsoft’s search group, Bing, that the company has released an application for the Android platform from Google. The move could be seen as an encroachment on Google’s turf, as the two companies compete directly on a number of search platforms.


By NICK BILTON

Microsoft Microsoft Bing is now available as a downloadable application for the Android platform.

Bing for Android

In late 2009, when Microsoft introduced a downloadable application for the iPhone from Apple, it set off some excitement in the tech world. For years, Microsoft and Apple had been head-to-head in the war for personal computing.

On Monday, the tech world was buzzing again with an announcement by Microsoft’s search group, Bing, that the company has released an application for the Android platform from Google. The move could be seen as an encroachment on Google’s turf, as the two companies compete directly on a number of search platforms. Leer más “Microsoft Enters Google’s Unwalled Garden”

Is the Future of Mobile Broadband Pay As You Go?

Over the past few weeks, I have been considering a mobile broadband solution. My reasoning is two-fold: I’d like a backup in case my regular connection fails–Comcast here has become somewhat spotty as of late–and something for when I’m on the road at a conference and don’t want to depend on the available Wi-Fi, which is sometimes unreliable.

For the time being, I have settled on Virgin Mobile’s Broadband2Go offering (I’ll have a review of it coming in a week or two after I’ve put it through its paces). It’s cheap, the initial cost of startup is not high, and it’s now Mac compatible. But while at Wal-Mart, I was shocked to see Verizon and AT&T are now offering their own prepaid plans. I must have missed their announcements–and it’s kind of surprising to me that those companies be interested in getting into the game.


Over the past few weeks, I have been considering a mobile broadband solution. My reasoning is two-fold: I’d like a backup in case my regular connection fails–Comcast here has become somewhat spotty as of late–and something for when I’m on the road at a conference and don’t want to depend on the available Wi-Fi, which is sometimes unreliable.

For the time being, I have settled on Virgin Mobile’s Broadband2Go offering (I’ll have a review of it coming in a week or two after I’ve put it through its paces). It’s cheap, the initial cost of startup is not high, and it’s now Mac compatible. But while at Wal-Mart, I was shocked to see Verizon and AT&T are now offering their own prepaid plans. I must have missed their announcements–and it’s kind of surprising to me that those companies be interested in getting into the game. Leer más “Is the Future of Mobile Broadband Pay As You Go?”

Blockbuster Moves onto Droid X


Verizon Wireless logo
Image via Wikipedia

Blockbuster is expanding its mobile efforts. Verizon Wireless announced that Blockbuster on Demand, an online movie buying and rental service, will become available on the new Motorola Droid X.

Blockbuster on Demand has already been available on T-Mobile’s HTC HD2 since March. In late 2009, Blockbuster launched an app allowing iPhone and iPod touch users to rent and buy movies. Leer más “Blockbuster Moves onto Droid X”

War Between Wireless Carriers Doesn’t Sway Consumers


The price war between wireless carriers—AT&T, Verizon Wireless and Sprint—hasn’t changed consumer perceptions much at all. All the carriers still get low value marks, and for Verizon Wireless, it’s caused a drawn out lull, according to market research firm YouGov‘s BrandIndex report.

The Brandweek Buzz Report by YouGov is a weekly consumer perception report that analyzes the most talked about brands based on buzz: The scores are based on weighing positive and negative perceptions of a brand. A +100 score is positive, a -100 score is negative, and a rating of zero means that the score is neutral. This week’s report also features scores based on brand value and quality.

YouGov interviews 5,000 people each weekday from a representative U.S. population sample. Respondents are drawn from an online panel of 1.5 million individuals.

This week, the report spotlights:

•    AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Sprint
•    Toyota, Lexus
•    State Farm Insurance

Wireless Price War
After calling each other names throughout the fall, the two largest wireless carriers switched tactics in the one area where consumers see the whole category lacking—value. AT&T came out swinging first by announcing it was lowering the price of its unlimited calling plan from $99 to $69, which Verizon Wireless quickly matched.

The initial impact in early February was immediate. AT&T’s value score jumped from -4.5 in mid-January to 10 in a matter of two weeks. Meanwhile, Verizon Wireless’ score was cut more than half to 9 in the same time period. When the deal was matched, AT&T retreated to pre-promotion negative territory levels, Verizon Wireless did a modest bounce back, and Sprint rose from -36.1 to -16.

Sprint’s recent ad featuring CEO Dan Hesse burst the whole bubble. Hesse pointed out that with Sprint’s competitors, what you see is not what you get: AT&T and Verizon Wireless’ deals were just for voice, and all mid-level smartphones would require an additional data or text plan. Sprint then promoted its $69 package as an all-inclusive with unlimited voice, text and Web. Sprint’s attack had a mild effect on the brand, taking it from -25.5 to -23. AT&T slowly climbed back into positive sentiment with a current 5.7 score. Verizon Wireless still leads with 20.5, but still lower than its Jan. 4 score of 36.1.

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