Investigación de Mercado: Focus Group Vs Experiencia Digital


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

Hay muy buenas empresas de investigación de mercado, pero no todas han asumido la investigación de mercados on line en su actividad diaria.

Los focus group muchas veces han terminado por considerarse el fracaso de las estadísticas fiables. Y es que es inevitable que la gente se comporte de forma diferente cuando alguien le mira, es la naturaleza humana, y es precisamente lo que ocurre cuando se hace un focus group.

Un focus group es algo caro, deficiente, impreciso y engañoso, al que se enfrenta directamente la prueba a través de experiencias digitales en su lugar. Pippa Nutt, vicepresidenta online y de medios en Canadá de Northern Lights Direct explica en DMNews por qué:

1. La gente se comporta de forma diferente cuando está debajo de un microscopio
El comportamiento de los sujetos de un estudio inevitablemente se ve alterado porque éstos saben que están siendo observados. Y si el responsable del estudio es consciente de que los sujetos se comportan de forma diferente, ¿qué validez tienen esos datos? Además, la persona que dirige el grupo influye sobre los resultados, especialmente cuando hay sujetos con una opinión formada sobre la dirección que creen que debería tomar el grupo.

Es inevitable. La naturaleza humana nos hace interpretar los signos más sutiles y reaccionar de acuerdo a ellos, lo que altera cualquier resultado. Y esto no pasa online, porque no sabemos necesariamente si alguien nos mira, haciendo que las reacciones sean más nativas, naturales y, como consecuencia, más válidas desde la perspectiva del marketing.

2. Las audiencias en los focus group no son un reflejo de la audiencia real, y menos de la audiencia online
Es imposible comparar el impacto o la validez del comportamiento de miles de visitantes a una web con un focus group de participantes que, primero tienen que querer participar, entrar en los criterios de selección y, también, caber en la sala que se ha reservado para tal propósito. Al final, la audiencia de un focus group es algo que se selecciona y para el que la gente tiene que querer entrar en esa selección. Leer más “Investigación de Mercado: Focus Group Vs Experiencia Digital”

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Una startup de Wayra Argentina presentará su proyecto a inversores de EE.UU.


Wayra, la aceleradora global de startups tecnológicas de Telefónica, anuncia su primer “Demo Day” internacional el 12 de diciembre en Miami, Estados Unidos.
Durante este encuentro se presentará ante la comunidad inversora americana, reunida en el marco de la Americas Venture Capital Conference (AVCC), una selección de las startups aceleradas durante este año en sus doce sedes de Latinoamérica y Europa.
Las startups presentarán propuestas a problemas y oportundiades de negocio en áreas tales como “cloud computing”, video, HTML5, servicios financieros, aplicaciones móviles, e-Health y seguridad, entre otras.
Por parte de Wayra Argentina, Quolaw participará de este hito. Leer más “Una startup de Wayra Argentina presentará su proyecto a inversores de EE.UU.”

Time & Follow Through on Your Goals


Manage time and follow through

Work Awesome | Pooja Lohana

Several years ago, I moved to Silicon Valley to pursue a healthcare-related postgraduate degree. The first six months or so of school was the most rigorous academic experience I’ve ever had. Forty plus hours in the classroom per week plus study time crammed into short quarters was much more than I could handle.

After things started lightening up a bit, I began expanding my horizons in the local area. I started meeting people who were young like me, but working at some of the local famous tech companies. It seemed like everyone was incredibly busy at work but were always making time to meet with other people to talk about startup companies.

I soon started attending some of these meetings because my background was related to the tech industry. It wasn’t long after that when I decided I too wanted to try a startup.

I didn’t know where to begin so I started making a list of the most important things a startup needed. I started asking questions around venture-capital, fundraising, software development, and all the other things which can go into a new company. All of these things were great, but without a rock solid idea I didn’t think I’d have a chance of succeeding.

I partnered with a local entrepreneur who had experience building and selling companies. He also had experience in the healthcare space so we decided to do a healthcare startup. On top of all my personal responsibilities at school I spent long hours trying to manage my time and develop our idea into a fundable business.

It’s been a few years since we set everything in motion but now after countless hours of hard work we’re finally seeing the company take off.

It’s definitely been an interesting journey through the wilderness to get to where we are. We’ve had to set milestones and goals and work diligently to achieve them. Business plans don’t write themselves. Strategic partners aren’t formed on their own. Software coding doesn’t happen out of thin air. These must all be accomplished by making a target and aiming for it. If I had to sum it up in two things, I’d say I only succeeded in starting up my business because I learned to manage time and follow through my goals.

Manage Your Time…  Leer más “Time & Follow Through on Your Goals”

In Brazil, Babies Mean Business | Jillian D’Onfro


inc.com

A small crop of Brazilian baby retailers are gaining traction–and funding from high-profile investors.
Baby boom? It looks like there is a burgeoning baby e-commerce sector in Brazil.

shutterstock images

Most recently, Baby, a Brazil-based online retailer of baby goods, just secured $16.7 million in financing, led by Accel Partners, according to The New York Times.

This announcement comes hot on the heels of more Brazil baby start-up success: Another online retailer, Bebestore, recently raised more than $10 million from London-based venture capital firm Atomico, reported The Times.

Overall, Brazil’s economic growth forecasts continue to drop, but e-commerce still entices investors. Why?  Brazilians spent 26% more online last year than they did in 2010—or $10.1 billion. This year, experts estimate total spending to increase to $12.6 billion.

While the sector is growing, it does offer unique challenges for entrepreneurs.  The two Americans who founded Baby, Davis Smith and Kimball Thomas, told the paper they struggled with a shipping infrastructure that is very different from that in the United States.

“Being an entrepreneur in Brazil is not for the faint of heart,” Smith told The Times.

Thinking global is not an option for startups anymore // blog.press42.com


By Alex aka Chief WOWness  //  press42

We just got back from Poland were we were invited to give a talk at one of the largest investment forums in Poland, the Satus VC investment forum. It’s been a very interesting trip. We were initially connected with them in San Francisco and we had a long conversation on the need of getting European companies outside their local boundaries.

Satus VC runs 3 different incubator programs across Poland and as such, it has a very large pool of startups in its portfolio. Because they touch many fields, they have very different types of companies, some of which have global goals in sight. And as such, they asked us to collaborate with them in aiding these startups when it comes to communicating and going global.

So we delivered a first talk on the matter that judging by the feedback we got from many attendees, it was very well received and it nailed down the major problems Polish, and most definitely, most Easter European companies are experiencing in terms of market location.

We can’t stress how important it is for European companies to break the local barriers and start thinking in a global way from day one. Most people would mistake thinking global with going international. While it might seem similar, one is a probable consequence of the other. Leer más “Thinking global is not an option for startups anymore // blog.press42.com”

Case Study: When Key Employees Clash

The caller ID on Matthew Spark’s phone read “Kid Spectrum, Inc.” It was someone from the Orlando office, probably administrative director Ellen Larson. She had been in daily contact with Matthew since he purchased the company, a provider of in-home autism services for children, eight months ago. He appreciated Ellen’s eagerness to help him build the business, even if she was sometimes abrupt. Kid Spectrum’s previous owner, Arthur Hamel, had told Matthew that Ellen, with nearly two decades of experience in health services, would be one of his biggest assets.


HBR Blog Network
blogs.hbr.org

H. Irving Grousbeck

H. IRVING GROUSBECK

H. Irving Grousbeck is a consulting professor of management at Stanford Graduate School of
Business and a director of its Center for Entrepreneurial Studies.


______.______
Editor’s Note: This fictionalized case study will appear in a forthcoming issue of Harvard Business Review, along with commentary from experts and readers. If you’d like your comment to be considered for publication, please be sure to include your full name, company or university affiliation, and email address.

The caller ID on Matthew Spark’s phone read “Kid Spectrum, Inc.” It was someone from the Orlando office, probably administrative director Ellen Larson. She had been in daily contact with Matthew since he purchased the company, a provider of in-home autism services for children, eight months ago. He appreciated Ellen’s eagerness to help him build the business, even if she was sometimes abrupt. Kid Spectrum’s previous owner, Arthur Hamel, had told Matthew that Ellen, with nearly two decades of experience in health services, would be one of his biggest assets.

“Matthew, it’s Ellen. I don’t want to bother you again, but we have a situation down here.”
Matthew sat back in his chair and readied himself. The “situation” could be anything from the copier running out of ink to the building catching on fire.

“I’m calling about Ronnie,” she said… Leer más “Case Study: When Key Employees Clash”

Reviving Entrepreneurship

America’s economic culture has traditionally been distinguished by a willingness to pursue opportunities; a parallel willingness to adopt new products and services; social, legal, and economic tolerance for failure; and the ability to efficiently redeploy people and money. All this has led to a highly evolved system for allocating human and financial capital to entrepreneurial ventures, which has brought the U.S. enormous advantage.

But this entrepreneurial engine is showing serious signs of weakness. Considerably fewer new businesses are formed in the United States today than in the past, creating fewer new jobs. Venture capital funding has contracted in both amount and breadth, and initial public offerings of small-cap companies have sharply declined. In other markets, including China and Brazil, those indicators are moving in the opposite direction.

As U.S. policy makers wake up to the need to reinvigorate entrepreneurial ventures, they must recognize entrepreneurship as a process, not an act. Their decisions change the climate for new enterprises at each stage of that process, sometimes dramatically—whether or not those decisions are made with entrepreneurship in mind.

Spot an Opportunity

Basic and Translational Science
U.S. government funding of basic research has paid off handsomely in the past. Private capital has been able to leverage federally supported discoveries, allowing them to be translated into valuable commercial applications. But the level and nature of government research funding are problematic today. As resources tighten up, decisions about what to fund grow ever more conservative. Labs have difficulty obtaining capital for the projects with the greatest potential societal payback, because those projects tend to be highly speculative and to challenge conventional wisdom. The U.S. needs to find a way to facilitate the right kinds of “risky” research.


by Josh Lerner and William Sahlman http://hbr.org/2012/03/reviving-entrepreneurship/ar/
Photograph: Topical Press
Agency/Stringer/Getty Images: Orville Wright lands a glider, 1911
America’s economic culture has traditionally been distinguished by a willingness to pursue opportunities; a parallel willingness to adopt new products and services; social, legal, and economic tolerance for failure; and the ability to efficiently redeploy people and money. All this has led to a highly evolved system for allocating human and financial capital to entrepreneurial ventures, which has brought the U.S. enormous advantage.

But this entrepreneurial engine is showing serious signs of weakness. Considerably fewer new businesses are formed in the United States today than in the past, creating fewer new jobs. Venture capital funding has contracted in both amount and breadth, and initial public offerings of small-cap companies have sharply declined. In other markets, including China and Brazil, those indicators are moving in the opposite direction.

As U.S. policy makers wake up to the need to reinvigorate entrepreneurial ventures, they must recognize entrepreneurship as a process, not an act. Their decisions change the climate for new enterprises at each stage of that process, sometimes dramatically—whether or not those decisions are made with entrepreneurship in mind.

Spot an Opportunity

Basic and Translational Science
U.S. government funding of basic research has paid off handsomely in the past. Private capital has been able to leverage federally supported discoveries, allowing them to be translated into valuable commercial applications. But the level and nature of government research funding are problematic today. As resources tighten up, decisions about what to fund grow ever more conservative. Labs have difficulty obtaining capital for the projects with the greatest potential societal payback, because those projects tend to be highly speculative and to challenge conventional wisdom. The U.S. needs to find a way to facilitate the right kinds of “risky” research. Leer más “Reviving Entrepreneurship”