Will Mobile Apps Put You Out Of Work?

Not long after the Wired article debuted, Barry Adams wrote about the potential death of seo for The Fire Horse Trail. Barry isn’t predicting seo’s demise so much as it’s change in the face of the move toward apps.

Again search engines can’t crawl apps and if that’s where content resides how will search engines crawl and index and rank content?

Websites still are and will be for some time the primary way we interact with content online. It’s not as though you’re going to wake up tomorrow in a world without them or a world without Google. 10 years from now we may not be using our browser as much as we do now, but we’ll likely still be using it.

As I mentioned above there are only so many apps you can realistic download and use. A browser can easily be the catchall app for all the apps we don’t inevitably download and use.


Steven Bradley

by Steven Bradley
http://www.vanseodesign.com | ABSTRACT
Thanks top Steven Bradley

In August Chris Andersen and Michael Wolf wrote an article for Wired Magazine under the title, The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet. The article talks about how the internet is moving away from the wide open web as viewed through a browser and toward a semi-closed web viewed through apps.

This paradigm shift has many implications that impact web designers as well as SEOs and I want to talk about this shift and what it means for those of us working online by looking at some of the other articles that have followed the Wired article and adding my thoughts to the mix.

iPhone home screen with folders of apps

Apps Are Here to Stay. Long Live Apps

I’m guessing many of you own a smart phone and possibly another mobile device capable of connecting to the internet. I own both an iPhone and an iPad and I have to agree that more and more I use an app instead of a browser to interact with content online.

Chris begins his portion of the Wired article describing a typical day in which you check email on an ipad or smart phone and move on to using Twitter and Facebook apps. Maybe you take in the NY Times and read through a list of feeds in two more apps. At the end of the day you unwind by playing games against friends on the Xbox Live or watch a movie over Netflix.

You’ve spent the day on the Internet — but not on the Web. And you are not alone.

More and more we’re using the Internet to to transport information, but less and less we’re using the browser to display and interact with that information.

Even on your computer you might choose an app over the web. For example I hardly every visit Twitter the website. Since the beginning I’ve used one of available desktop clients. Same for Facebook. Most of the content I absorb online comes in though my rss reader. This post will mostly be written in a couple of programs residing on my desktop only passing through the WordPress admin briefly as a last check before publishing.

Search engines can’t crawl apps. html isn’t the dominant language across apps. Many of the things you and I do as part of our jobs aren’t as prevalent inside apps as they are on the web itself. Surely this will affect us.

Theme design for Apple's app store

Chris points out how this shift was inevitable, citing past industries with similar change and pointing out that while most of us might intellectually appreciate openness we inevitably choose the path of least resistance. Apps are simply easier and often better than their website counterparts.

In Michael’s part of the article he also argues this shift is inevitable, but for a different reason. Business can make more money through apps than through the web. Most of us won’t pay to read the news on a website, yet many of us will happily shell out a few bucks to have the paper delivered to us via an app.

None of this is to say the web is going away and the browser will die an ugly death. Apps won’t kill the web any more than the web killed tv, tv killed radio, or radio killed print. We’ll be using our browser (another app) to visit web pages for quiet some time.

While I use more and more apps, I still inevitably find most through a web page in my browser. And as great as apps might be, there’s a limit to how many we can download and realistically use before their number overwhelms us. The web through a browser isn’t going away any time soon.

Still this shift is taking place and will only accelerate as more or us carry and use internet capable mobile devices like smart phones and tablets.

seo is dead

SEO is Dead. Long Live SEO… Leer más “Will Mobile Apps Put You Out Of Work?”

How To Help Search Engines Find Your Content | Van SEO Design


Additional Resources

Meta Robots

Canonical Tag

Robots.txt

301 Redirects

Robotic spider

Summary

The way you structure your content plays a part in how well your content gets crawled and indexed. If you want a search engine to list one of your pages in their results, the search engine first needs to find that page. It’s important that we make it easier for spiders to find all of the pages we want indexed.

Fortunately most of the ways you help search engines find your content also helps real people find that same content. A sitemap for example can serve as a great backup to your main navigation and can be organized in a way that makes it a table of contents for your entire site. Shorter click paths mean people as well as spiders can get to your content quicker.

Sometimes though, we need to understand the difference in how people and search engines see things. Real people won’t have any problem with multiple URLs pointing to the same content. If anything it likely makes it easier for them. Search engines on the other hand still get confused by “duplicate content” and you need to be aware of that so you can help make things clearer for them.

Next week we’ll look beyond crawling and indexing and talk about siloing or theming your content. The idea is to develop the structure of your content in a way to help reinforce the different keyword themes on your site and in the process help your pages rank better for keyword phrases around those themes.

vía:

How To Help Search Engines Find Your Content | Van SEO Design.

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Why Posting Less Can Improve Your Blog

A funny thing happened. This blog has been consistently growing since that decision to post less. Traffic is up and subscribers are up. Both have increased at a much greater rate then they had been when I was trying to write more often.

Less posting is certainly not the only reason, but less posting has meant more quality to each post, which has been a big part of the growth I’ve seen over the last 18 months. As I’ve set up a process to increase blogging productivity I’m now also able to post twice a week, while still maintaining a quality I’m happy with.

Others have had similar experiences. Just this week Larry Brooks, who has an excellent blog for writers (mainly fiction writers) at storyfix.com, posted a similar story to mine above called Just Maybe…He Who Blogs Less Blogs Best.

Less blogging led to increased quality and ultimately more traffic for Larry as it did for me.

The next time I redesign this site, I’ll likely go through old posts and remove many. I’ll remove those posts that aren’t really worth reading and don’t pull any traffic to them. I’ll prune the posts that aren’t contributing, much as you would prune dead or dying leaves from a plant to help it grow.

It’ll be interesting to see what effect that has on traffic to the site.


by Steven Bradley

Is more content always better? Is more traffic, more followers, more page views automatically better? Is it more signal or more noise? Is it more of something that doesn’t help you achieve your goals? Isn’t it true that sometimes less is more? Can posting less actually improve your blog?

* It’s one more link for subscribers to click on in their feed reader
* It’s one more page for search engines to index rank
* It’s one more page that can generate incoming links and referral traffic

However does that mean you should post more often than you currently post now? Chris himself isn’t saying you should automatically post more. His article is mainly an observation, and a true one at that. More posts will lead to more traffic. As Chris points out many top blogs post more than 5 times daily. This more posts leading to more traffic really isn’t in question. The question is, is more traffic necessarily better?

My answer is the ever so definitive “it depends.”

Leer más “Why Posting Less Can Improve Your Blog”

Why Your Website is More Valuable Than Facebook

I was shocked today to discover a pretty well-put-together restaurant in Chicago that only has a Facebook page instead of a designated website. I personally don’t like that and think it looks bad on them, what do you guys think?

Many local only businesses still forego developing a site for their business, restaurants especially. Some, having heard of social media, are now setting up profiles and marketing through social sites, but still don’t have their own website. Is this a good idea? Is a website no longer necessary? Or are these businesses making a huge mistake?

Last week I talked about how many of our social media profiles are little more than a wasteland. As part of that post I mentioned the idea your site being your home base online and your social profiles being outposts.

I wanted to take a little more time today to discuss that idea and then offer some reasons why you might forego a site in favor of Facebook (or any other popular social site) and then explain why I think having your own site is so much more important and why it’s more valuable to you than your presence on Facebook.


Steven Bradley
by Steven Bradley

If you were given a choice when first taking your “brick and mortar” business online to develop a website or set up a Page on Facebook, and you weren’t allowed to do the other which would you choose? Would you build a website and give up marketing through Facebook or would you set up a Facebook page and give up having your own website?

Think about the questions as you read through this post.

Facebook logo

Last week Clay started a thread on my small business forum that essentially asked the question above. The thread started with the following statement

I was shocked today to discover a pretty well-put-together restaurant in Chicago that only has a Facebook page instead of a designated website. I personally don’t like that and think it looks bad on them, what do you guys think?

Many local only businesses still forego developing a site for their business, restaurants especially. Some, having heard of social media, are now setting up profiles and marketing through social sites, but still don’t have their own website. Is this a good idea? Is a website no longer necessary? Or are these businesses making a huge mistake?

Last week I talked about how many of our social media profiles are little more than a wasteland. As part of that post I mentioned the idea your site being your home base online and your social profiles being outposts.

I wanted to take a little more time today to discuss that idea and then offer some reasons why you might forego a site in favor of Facebook (or any other popular social site) and then explain why I think having your own site is so much more important and why it’s more valuable to you than your presence on Facebook.

Graph showing the relationshi between home basses and outposts

The diagram above will be explained further down in this post. Leer más “Why Your Website is More Valuable Than Facebook”