Did Super Bowl Advertisers Take Advantage of Search Interest?

Over the past couple of days, numerous stats and figures have been published about how Super Bowl advertisers took advantage (or not) of social media this year. But commercials also drive people to search engines, which in turn (when things go right) can lead potential customers to advertiser web sites where rather than talk about a brand as they can on social media sites, they can watch the commercials again, cementing brand messaging, and take a closer look at the products being sold. (Which is presumably why a company would spend $3.5 million dollars on a thirty second spot in the first place.)
Commercials Drive Searches


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Over the past couple of days, numerous stats and figures have been published about how Super Bowl advertisers took advantage (or not) of social media this year. But commercials also drive people to search engines, which in turn (when things go right) can lead potential customers to advertiser web sites where rather than talk about a brand as they can on social media sites, they can watch the commercials again, cementing brand messaging, and take a closer look at the products being sold. (Which is presumably why a company would spend $3.5 million dollars on a thirty second spot in the first place.)

Commercials Drive Searches

Since the 2009 Super Bowl, I’ve monitored how the ads influence search interest, and every year, the trend has been the same. As people watch the Super Bowl, they search for everything they’re watching: teams, players, performers, and of course, commercials. The trend continues the day after the game as people talk about the commercials and turn to Google (and Bing) to watch them again. Take a look at the spiking searches for February 7th, the day after the game according to Google Trends:

Google Super Bowl Trends - Monday Leer más “Did Super Bowl Advertisers Take Advantage of Search Interest?”

10 (almost) ironclad arguments for SEO


White hat seo symbolizes good ethic techniques...
by ian

SEO. What’s the deal? Why do marketing VPs, IT teams and CFO’s flee, screaming, at the mere mention of search engine optimization?

I have no answers.

However, I do have a few points – data-driven or otherwise – that I’ve used to sell SEO in the past. I’ve tested extensively, and I can tell you that these all work far better than threatening to give your client a lederhosen wedgie. Leer más “10 (almost) ironclad arguments for SEO”

10 statements that make my head explode, and what they really mean


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by ian

Every now and then, someone says something that passes cringe-worthy and goes straight to neural overload. At those times, I get a temporary case of Exploding Head Syndrome (it’s real). I’ll skip the political stuff like “Global warming isn’t real” and “Get your government hands off my Medicare” and stick to internet marketing: Leer más “10 statements that make my head explode, and what they really mean”

10 statements that make my head explode, and what they really mean

Every now and then, someone says something that passes cringe-worthy and goes straight to neural overload. At those times, I get a temporary case of Exploding Head Syndrome (it’s real). I’ll skip the political stuff like “Global warming isn’t real” and “Get your government hands off my Medicare” and stick to internet marketing:

Quote 1: “We don’t need the internet. We get all our business from direct mail.”

Really? Wow, you’re lucky. You’ve established that not one internet user could become a customer. That eliminates a big expense of, maybe, $200k/year. Except, of course, that direct mail costs at least $100k per sending.

What you really said: “I like burning my company’s money. The internet is scary. Plus, I have zero motivation to improve anything.”

Quote 2: “SEO? That’s a fiction. The search engines figure it all out. We’ll stick with PPC”

I thought I was the only person to hear this quote, but Vanessa Fox wrote about it in her book, Marketing in the Age of Google . So I’m in good company.

I’m so proud of you! In the face of overwhelming evidence that 85% of people who use a search engine click on the unpaid results, you’ve stuck to your guns. You’re going to ignore that 85%. That’ll show ‘em!

What you really said: “I also refute global warming, and believe firmly that T Rex used its teeth to crack coconuts in the Garden of Eden.”


Every now and then, someone says something that passes cringe-worthy and goes straight to neural overload. At those times, I get a temporary case of Exploding Head Syndrome (it’s real). I’ll skip the political stuff like “Global warming isn’t real” and “Get your government hands off my Medicare” and stick to internet marketing:

Quote 1: “We don’t need the internet. We get all our business from direct mail.”

Really? Wow, you’re lucky. You’ve established that not one internet user could become a customer. That eliminates a big expense of, maybe, $200k/year. Except, of course, that direct mail costs at least $100k per sending.

What you really said: “I like burning my company’s money. The internet is scary. Plus, I have zero motivation to improve anything.”
Quote 2: “SEO? That’s a fiction. The search engines figure it all out. We’ll stick with PPC”

I thought I was the only person to hear this quote, but Vanessa Fox wrote about it in her book, Marketing in the Age of Google . So I’m in good company.

I’m so proud of you! In the face of overwhelming evidence that 85% of people who use a search engine click on the unpaid results, you’ve stuck to your guns. You’re going to ignore that 85%. That’ll show ‘em!

What you really said: “I also refute global warming, and believe firmly that T Rex used its teeth to crack coconuts in the Garden of Eden.” Leer más “10 statements that make my head explode, and what they really mean”