Windows 8 Must Battle XP for Large Chunk of User Base


mashable.com

While Windows 8 rolled out to great fanfare Thursday, it still has to fight fellow Microsoft operating system Windows XP for users.

The 11-year-old program has nearly 30% “usage share” worldwide, reports web analytics firm StatCounter. Although Microsoft stopped selling it in 2010, XP remains one of the most popular OSestoday.

As of September, XP holds 27.64% usage share worldwide — second only to Windows 7 at 52.2%, according to StatCounter. In the U.S., XP has 16.42%, while Windows 7 sits at 49.36% (the latter debuted in 2009).

SEE ALSO: How to Get Windows 8 Now

“Our stats confirm the theory that business users in particular have been reluctant to move from XP,” said StatCounter CEO Aodhan Cullen. “The new Windows 8 interface represents a radical overhaul for Microsoft.”

“The scale of change of the desktop experience, however, may heighten the initial reluctance of traditional business users to upgrade to this new OS.” Leer más “Windows 8 Must Battle XP for Large Chunk of User Base”

The 2011 Web Analytics Review – Infographic based on Google’s 2011 Data


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Hundreds of thousands of websites across the globe have participated in Google’s ongoing study of web browsing behavior. So far, the results of the study have been very insightful. For example, global bounce rates and average time-on-site metrics are decreasing. In the operating systems wars, the Macintosh market share is steadily growing, while the Windows market share is dropping. Dig into the data presented below to discover global web usage trends.

The 2011 Web Analytics Review

View an enlarged version of this Infographic »

Via blog.kissmetrics.com

Internet Explorer continues to build back market share

After years and years of seeing other browsers chip away at its browser dominance, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer is gaining back market share, and that trend has continued with the latest numbers reported.

Browser tracking firm Net Applications released its findings of Internet browser usage for July and found that Internet Explorer took the lead, as per usual, with 60.74% of the market share.

That was a slight, 0.42 percentage point, increase over June, while the other major browsers lost footing in July. The top five browsers were:

Internet Explorer – 60.74%
Firefox – 22.91%
Chrome – 7.16%
Safari – 5.09%
Opera – 2.45%


Internet Explorer Mobile Logo
Image via Wikipedia

After years and years of seeing other browsers chip away at its browser dominance, Microsoft‘s Internet Explorer is gaining back market share, and that trend has continued with the latest numbers reported.

Browser tracking firm Net Applications released its findings of Internet browser usage for July and found that Internet Explorer took the lead, as per usual, with 60.74% of the market share.

That was a slight, 0.42 percentage point, increase over June, while the other major browsers lost footing in July. The top five browsers were:

Internet Explorer – 60.74%
Firefox – 22.91%
Chrome – 7.16%
Safari – 5.09%
Opera – 2.45% Leer más “Internet Explorer continues to build back market share”

Will the Real Browser Stats Please Stand Up?

Recently, Mashable published an article entitled “IE6 Finally Nearing Extinction”, announcing that IE6 usage in the United States and Europe have finally dropped below 5%.

That news probably warmed the cockles of the hearts of web designers everywhere. Thus, it seems designers and developers now have even more incentive to stop supporting IE6, following the pattern set by Google, notably with regards to YouTube.

The stats in the Mashable article are based on StatCounter Global Stats. In this article, I’ll provide some food for thought by way of some alternative statistics that in many ways contradict the sources for the article published by Mashable.

These stats should drive home the point that every website is different, and that in some cases it may still be necessary to provide a fairly decent experience in IE6, while progressively enhancing design and functionality for newer browsers.


Recently, Mashable published an article entitled “IE6 Finally Nearing Extinction”, announcing that IE6 usage in the United States and Europe have finally dropped below 5%.

That news probably warmed the cockles of the hearts of web designers everywhere. Thus, it seems designers and developers now have even more incentive to stop supporting IE6, following the pattern set by Google, notably with regards to YouTube.

The stats in the Mashable article are based on StatCounter Global Stats. In this article, I’ll provide some food for thought by way of some alternative statistics that in many ways contradict the sources for the article published by Mashable.

These stats should drive home the point that every website is different, and that in some cases it may still be necessary to provide a fairly decent experience in IE6, while progressively enhancing design and functionality for newer browsers.

Leer más “Will the Real Browser Stats Please Stand Up?”