This Swiss Army Knife Comes With a 1 TB USB Flash Drive

Data transfer speeds are 220 MB/s for reading and 150 MB/s for writing data, and the availabile capacities range from 64 GB to a whopping 1 TB.

Of course, the knife also has a blade, scissors, nail file with a screwdriver tip and a LED/laser pointer. All you frequent travelers needn’t worry – the drive can be interchanged between the fully-equipped body and the flight-friendly body, which comes without the pointy stuff.

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Victorinox has unveiled a Swiss Army knife with a USB flash drive that holds 1 terabyte of data.

The company has had a USB knife in its line of products for a while, but the Victorinox SSD comes with several new features: it connects to eSATA II/III as well as USB 2.0/3.0 with a single connector, it has a monochrome graphic display showing what’s on the drive and it supports 256 AES encryption. Leer más “This Swiss Army Knife Comes With a 1 TB USB Flash Drive”

Hands on: Asus Zenbook

Ultrabooks are the PC world’s latest attempt to wrestle back more of the portability market from tablets. In a nutshell, ultrabooks aim to deliver the grunt of a notebook within the petitie frame of a netbook – following in the footsteps of Apple’s MacBook Air.

Two weeks ago I took a look at the Toshiba Satellite Z830, a 13.3-inch ultrabook that’s packed with features but hampered by the somewhat cramped keyboard. Today I’m sitting down with an Asus Zenbook, which is available in four models; a choice of 11.6-inch or 13.3-inch displays sporting Core i5 or i7 processors. I’m looking at the 11.6-inch Zenbook UX21E RY008V with the Core i7 powerplant.


Asus Zenbook.Asus Zenbook.

Asus’ Zenbook struggles to strike a harmonious balance between portability and usability.

Ultrabooks are the PC world’s latest attempt to wrestle back more of the portability market from tablets. In a nutshell, ultrabooks aim to deliver the grunt of a notebook within the petitie frame of a netbook – following in the footsteps of Apple’s MacBook Air.

Two weeks ago I took a look at the Toshiba Satellite Z830, a 13.3-inch ultrabook that’s packed with features but hampered by the somewhat cramped keyboard. Today I’m sitting down with an Asus Zenbook, which is available in four models; a choice of 11.6-inch or 13.3-inch displays sporting Core i5 or i7 processors. I’m looking at the 11.6-inch Zenbook UX21E RY008V with the Core i7 powerplant. Leer más “Hands on: Asus Zenbook”

Playboy lanza disco duro externo con contenido precargado

Si eres de aquellos que aún no sabes qué pedirle al Viejito Pascuero (Papá Noel, Santa Claus o San Nicolás), tal vez esta sea el regalo que siempre quisiste tener.

La compañía Playboy acaba de poner a la venta un disco duro externo cuya principal característica es traer precargado todo el material publicado por la revista hasta estos días (650 ediciones, más de 100.000 páginas).

El disco duro tienen una capacidad de 250 GB y posee unas dimensiones que ya se quisiera cualquier conejita: 5×3×5 pulgadas.


Si eres de aquellos que aún no sabes qué pedirle al Viejito Pascuero (Papá Noel, Santa Claus o San Nicolás), tal vez esta sea el regalo que siempre quisiste tener.

La compañía Playboy acaba de poner a la venta un disco duro externo cuya principal característica es traer precargado todo el material publicado por la revista hasta estos días (650 ediciones, más de 100.000 páginas).

El disco duro tienen una capacidad de 250 GB y posee unas dimensiones que ya se quisiera cualquier conejita: 5×3×5 pulgadas.

Leer más “Playboy lanza disco duro externo con contenido precargado”

USB 3.0 to begin hitting critical mass in 2011

The adoption of USB 3.0 is expected to begin hitting critical mass in 2011, with NEC on track to ship at least 20 million next-gen xHCI controllers by the end of 2010.

“The high-rate of SuperSpeed adoption illustrates that USB 3.0 is a thriving and advanced ecosystem. It is already driving and creating a new generation of devices and components,” USB-IF president and chairman Jeff Ravencraft told TG Daily at IDF 2010.

“You know, just one year ago you could count the number of the number of certified USB 3.0 products on a single hand. But now we already have 120 certified and hitting the market. Of course, there are many, many more in the pipeline pending certification.”


Aharon Etengoff | //tgdaily.com

The adoption of USB 3.0 is expected to begin hitting critical mass in 2011, with NEC on track to ship at least 20 million next-gen xHCI controllers by the end of 2010.

“The high-rate of SuperSpeed adoption illustrates that USB 3.0 is a thriving and advanced ecosystem. It is already driving and creating a new generation of devices and components,” USB-IF president and chairman Jeff Ravencraft told TG Daily at IDF 2010.

“You know, just one year ago you could count the number of the number of certified USB 3.0 products on a single hand. But now we already have 120 certified and hitting the market. Of course, there are many, many more in the pipeline pending certification.”

USB 3.0 to begin hitting critical mass in 2011According to Ravencraft, both the industry and consumers worldwide are more than ready for USB 3.0 – which offers an impressive 10x performance increase over the previous iteration of the platform.

“The new standard is allowing OEMs to manufacture a fresh wave of devices that take advantage of SuperSpeed’s minimized wait time and optimized power efficiency. I would also like to note that USB 3.0 uses only 1/3 of the power compared to USB 2 – and of course, the standard is fully backwards compatible.

“In addition, we are already seeing advances in USB 3.0-based graphics technology by companies like SMSC which recently began sampling its ViewSpan product that allows users to easily connect multiple displays to both desktops and mobile PCs.” Leer más “USB 3.0 to begin hitting critical mass in 2011”

¿Qué futuro le espera al Blu-ray?

La tecnología prometía cambiar la forma de ver las películas, cuando llegó a la Argentina hace tres años. Los especialistas analizan por qué aún no se popularizó y cómo debe evaluarse la reaparición de los reproductores de DVD.

por Julieta Schulkin

En 2007, llegaba a la Argentina, de la mano de Sony, el primer reproductor de discos Blu-ray, el modelo BDP-S1E, para uso hogareño. Se trataba de un equipo capaz de reproducir películas pregrabadas de alta definición, soportando formatos DVD, DVD+RW/+R, DVD-RW/-R, AVCHD, MP3 y JPEG; con una salida de video HDMI y una salida de video componente análoga 1080i (entrelazada), para los HDTV que no cuentan con HDMI.

Tres años después, la tecnología Blu-ray no se ha popularizado aún. Inclusive, la desaparición del DVD no es una realidad como muchos lo han pronosticado. Todo lo contrario. Al respecto, Federico Bersaiz, Marketing Manager Audio, Video & Multimedia de Philips Argentina, comenta: “El Blu-ray es la evolución del DVD. Yo mismo me pregunté en varias ocasiones si la desaparición del DVD era realmente tal. La respuesta que me han dado desde la central de Philips, en Holanda, es que el Blu-ray va a ser el sustento de la tecnología 3D y que el soporte tendrá continuidad”. Cabe recordar que Philips es co-fundador de la Blu-ray Disc Association y ha tenido una activa participación en el desarrollo de la tecnología y el desarrollo del estándar Blu-ray Disc.


Blu-Ray Disc logo
La tecnología prometía cambiar la forma de ver las películas, cuando llegó a la Argentina hace tres años. Los especialistas analizan por qué aún no se popularizó y cómo debe evaluarse la reaparición de los reproductores de DVD.

por Julieta Schulkin

En 2007, llegaba a la Argentina, de la mano de Sony, el primer reproductor de discos Blu-ray, el modelo BDP-S1E, para uso hogareño. Se trataba de un equipo capaz de reproducir películas pregrabadas de alta definición, soportando formatos DVD, DVD+RW/+R, DVD-RW/-R, AVCHD, MP3 y JPEG; con una salida de video HDMI y una salida de video componente análoga 1080i (entrelazada), para los HDTV que no cuentan con HDMI.

Tres años después, la tecnología Blu-ray no se ha popularizado aún. Inclusive, la desaparición del DVD no es una realidad como muchos lo han pronosticado. Todo lo contrario. Al respecto, Federico Bersaiz, Marketing Manager Audio, Video & Multimedia de Philips Argentina, comenta: “El Blu-ray es la evolución del DVD. Yo mismo me pregunté en varias ocasiones si la desaparición del DVD era realmente tal. La respuesta que me han dado desde la central de Philips, en Holanda, es que el Blu-ray va a ser el sustento de la tecnología 3D y que el soporte tendrá continuidad”. Cabe recordar que Philips es co-fundador de la Blu-ray Disc Association y ha tenido una activa participación en el desarrollo de la tecnología y el desarrollo del estándar Blu-ray Disc. Leer más “¿Qué futuro le espera al Blu-ray?”

iMac Core i7 Review (Mid 2010)

By Vincent Nguyen
http://www.slashgear.com

Apple’s recent refresh of the all-in-one iMac range may not have concurred with all of the preceding rumors, but the main expectation was certainly met: faster processors than ever before. Fresh to the SlashGear test bench is the 27-inch iMac, with the flagship quadcore Intel CPU. Pairing a 2.93GHz Core i7 processor with 4GB of DDR3 memory and a 256GB SSD, it certainly promises high performance; it also makes for an expensive buy, $2,799 to specify the same spec as our review unit. Check out the full SlashGear review after the cut.

Apple iMac mid 2010 1 540×472

As well as the processor, memory and solid-state storage, there’s an ATI Radeon HD 5750 GPU with 1GB of its own GDDR5 memory and an 8x SuperDrive DVD burner. Still no Blu-ray option, of course, and no USB 3.0 ports either; instead Apple gives you four USB 2.0 ports, a FireWire 800 port, audio in/out (each combining analog and digital), gigabit ethernet and a Mini DisplayPort that, on this larger iMac, also functions as an input for hooking up your MacBook Pro. On the side, as well as the slot-loading optical drive there’s an SDXC memory card reader (backward compatible with SD/SDHC cards, naturally) while inside there’s WiFi a/b/g/n and Bluetooth 2.1+EDR. The latter is used with the bundled Apple Wireless Keyboard and Magic Mouse; the Magic Trackpad launched alongside the new iMacs is an optional extra.

Apple iMac mid 2010 25 540×303

While all-in-ones may not be particularly known for their upgrade potential, Apple has made great use of the 27-inch iMac’s internal space. The SSD is an option, but so is pairing a regular hard-drive with a solid-state counterpart, each occupying its own internal bay. The 27-inch model comes with a 1TB, 7,200rpm HDD as standard: you can upgrade that to 2TB or swap it for the 256GB SSD, or combine either HDD with the SSD. That could be useful for digital media pros looking for the system speed an SSD brings together with the relatively cost-effective storage a traditional HDD delivers. At this stage, you can’t combine two SSDs, however.


Apple’s recent refresh of the all-in-one iMac range may not have concurred with all of the preceding rumors, but the main expectation was certainly met: faster processors than ever before. Fresh to the SlashGear test bench is the 27-inch iMac, with the flagship quadcore Intel CPU. Pairing a 2.93GHz Core i7 processor with 4GB of DDR3 memory and a 256GB SSD, it certainly promises high performance; it also makes for an expensive buy, $2,799 to specify the same spec as our review unit. Check out the full SlashGear review after the cut.

Apple iMac mid 2010 1 540x472

As well as the processor, memory and solid-state storage, there’s an ATI Radeon HD 5750 GPU with 1GB of its own GDDR5 memory and an 8x SuperDrive DVD burner. Still no Blu-ray option, of course, and no USB 3.0 ports either; instead Apple gives you four USB 2.0 ports, a FireWire 800 port, audio in/out (each combining analog and digital), gigabit ethernet and a Mini DisplayPort that, on this larger iMac, also functions as an input for hooking up your MacBook Pro. On the side, as well as the slot-loading optical drive there’s an SDXC memory card reader (backward compatible with SD/SDHC cards, naturally) while inside there’s WiFi a/b/g/n and Bluetooth 2.1+EDR. The latter is used with the bundled Apple Wireless Keyboard and Magic Mouse; the Magic Trackpad launched alongside the new iMacs is an optional extra.

Apple iMac mid 2010 25 540x303

While all-in-ones may not be particularly known for their upgrade potential, Apple has made great use of the 27-inch iMac’s internal space. The SSD is an option, but so is pairing a regular hard-drive with a solid-state counterpart, each occupying its own internal bay. The 27-inch model comes with a 1TB, 7,200rpm HDD as standard: you can upgrade that to 2TB or swap it for the 256GB SSD, or combine either HDD with the SSD. That could be useful for digital media pros looking for the system speed an SSD brings together with the relatively cost-effective storage a traditional HDD delivers. At this stage, you can’t combine two SSDs, however. Leer más “iMac Core i7 Review (Mid 2010)”

Face-off: 1979 Apple Graphics Tablet vs. 2010 Apple iPad

The Apple Graphics Tablet (left) was released in 1979 and cost $650. It connects to any Apple II and can be used to draw images at a resolution of 280 by 192 pixels. The tablet draws power directly from the Apple II and cannot be used when disconnected.

The Apple II was originally designed to be used with televisions rather than computer monitors, but the Apple Graphics Tablet produced interference that could disrupt reception of television signals. A later model was identical to its predecessor except for one notable new feature: FCC compliance.

The Apple iPad (right) was released in 2010 in six models ranging from $499 to $829. Equipped with a 1-GHz A4 system-on-a-chip and a 16GB, 32GB or 64GB flash drive, it syncs with any Macintosh or Windows machine capable of running iTunes and can run thousands of iOS applications. Its resolution is 1024 by 768 pixels on a 9.7-in. LED-backlit glossy widescreen display.


30-year-old technology struts its stuff beside today’s state-of-the-art tablet computer

By Ken Gagne

old and new Apple logos When Apple launched the iPad earlier this year, it was the culmination of fans’ long wait for the company to enter the tablet computer market. There’s no doubt that Apple‘s iPad is a revolutionary computing device that’s ushering in a new era of tablet computing.

But in 1979, an earlier generation of Apple users used a different kind of Apple tablet, back when the word meant something else entirely.

The Apple Graphics Tablet was designed by Summagraphics and sold by Apple Computer Inc. for the Apple II personal microcomputer. (Summagraphics also marketed the device for other platforms as the BitPad.) To be clear, this tablet was not a stand-alone computing device like the iPad. Instead, it was an input device for creating images on the Apple II’s screen, and it predated the Apple II’s mouse by six years.

Apple II fan Tony Diaz had an Apple Graphics Tablet on hand at last month’s KansasFest, an annual convention for diehard Apple II users. He and Computerworld‘s Ken Gagne, the event’s marketing director, compared and contrasted Apple’s original tablet with the iPad, snapping photos as they went.

Despite the three decades of technology advancements that separate the two devices, some fun comparisons are still possible. Join us for a photo face-off between the two tablets.

Meet the tablets

Apple II Graphics Tablet and iPad side by side

The Apple Graphics Tablet (left) was released in 1979 and cost $650. It connects to any Apple II and can be used to draw images at a resolution of 280 by 192 pixels. The tablet draws power directly from the Apple II and cannot be used when disconnected.

The Apple II was originally designed to be used with televisions rather than computer monitors, but the Apple Graphics Tablet produced interference that could disrupt reception of television signals. A later model was identical to its predecessor except for one notable new feature: FCC compliance.

The Apple iPad (right) was released in 2010 in six models ranging from $499 to $829. Equipped with a 1-GHz A4 system-on-a-chip and a 16GB, 32GB or 64GB flash drive, it syncs with any Macintosh or Windows machine capable of running iTunes and can run thousands of iOS applications. Its resolution is 1024 by 768 pixels on a 9.7-in. LED-backlit glossy widescreen display. Leer más “Face-off: 1979 Apple Graphics Tablet vs. 2010 Apple iPad”