El humor, algo que las marcas han de tomarse muy en serio – gracias @CalvoConBarba


Por lucas@calvoconbarba.com
Este post me gustó mucho, por lo claro y los ejemplos que aporta. @gabrielcatalano

 

Esto no quiere decir que los departamentos legales o de Marketing dejen de tener sentido, ni mucho menos, sino que han de modificar sus actitudes y comportamientos para conseguir sus objetivos. No tiene sentido que se comporten como acaban de hacer la gente de Tupperware, a través de su despacho de “matones” legales, mandando a Kurioso una notificación legal para eliminar un contenido absolutamente inocuo de su blog como si eso fuera a dañar la marca, y cobra mucho más sentido comportamientos como el de la gente de Jack Daniel’s, que buscando el mismo fin, saben redactar un comunicado que consigue empatizar con quien lo recibe, y se convierte en un acción de comunicación, más que en una amenaza de matón bocazas de patio de recreo.

Lee el artículo completo, vale la pena ver los ejemplos! 🙂

La clave está en entender que tomarse en serio las cosas no implica necesariamente ser serio. O al menos no en el sentido de no tener sentido del humor. De hecho, el sentido del humor es uno de los sentidos que más hemos de trabajar en esta nueva etapa de comunicación social, que se hace pública y visible no sólo para quien la recibe, sino – potencialmente – para todo el mundo. Hay marcas que lo tienen claro, y saben reaccionar con humor incluso a las provocaciones, siendo las absolutas ganadoras de este nuevo medio. La semana pasada he conocido dos muy buenos ejemplo de esto, uno de Oreo, marca que realmente borda la comunicación últimamente, y otro de una marca al menos para mí desconocida, El Pastoret, pero que parece haber entendido a la perfección la capacidad “abre-puertas” que tiene el humor.

Lee el artículo completo, vale la pena ver los ejemplos! 🙂

 

 

 

 

What About Face-to-Facebook?


The recent frenzy of acquisition and consolidation in the social media space is reminiscent of many other boom periods in specific industries. With a wave of social media acquisitions that really came into prominence with the recent acquisitions of CMS vendors Vitrue and Buddy Media, there certainly are those out there that are riding that wave to glory.

Yet this is also a time that marketing consultants Ed Keller and Brad Fay liken to the Gold Rush in 1848. They point out that while this period brought fame and riches to some, for many others it was a farce, a period in which great promise bought little return due to the abandonment of reason by those attracted by its riches.

Keller and Fay carry out a survey that measures offline word-of-mouth, a service called TalkTrack, which dives into what gets consumers really talking. Their research shows that 90 percent of conversations about products, services and brands that take place every day happen offline, maintains that the conversations that we have online are wildly different to those we have offline and warns against what I label Bright Shiny Object Syndrome (this is the desire to blindly follow the latest trend without looking at a true goal or purpose, often leading to botched programs and unsuccessful activations).

Keller and Fay make many valid points in the book, all around what drives word of mouth and how marketers should take the time to understand how their end target will share information. It also maintains that social media are ultimately about people.

On reading it, this ultimately made me connect back to the principles of good social media and how their theories relate to the work we are doing. I have always strongly supported the importance of IRL – in real life – in all we do. I also support the “people theory.” Put otherwise, human beings are at our core fundamentally social. We are, and always have been, guided by the drivers of influence. All good social media practitioners will base their work on social behaviors rather than the latest trend.

At Ogilvy, we combine different theories of human behavior to drive impactful social that scales. One of the most effective theorists in the space is Robert Cialdini, seen by many in the industry as the Godfather of Influence.

His “six drivers” is a very useful list, and one that can be held up to any program to check off and ensure its effectiveness. (…) Leer más “What About Face-to-Facebook?”

Products that help you survive office life

When you are hired by a large company or corporation, you are shown a video on office harassment. The video looks like a 1970s porn film without the sex. Bad acting and rhythmic guitar rifts, but the common thread throughout the video is that even when you are in the right, if someone complains about you, then you are guilty and wrong. With a small cast of characters in this video, it’s always the same person being offended by the actions of coworkers. One might wonder why the old rules of society aren’t followed and the constant complainer isn’t just buried up to his or her neck and hit in turn by every other employee with a polo mallet until dead. The modern office has a strange political hierarchy and it will not bend or break to your will or common sense. Learn to deal with it safely and with a sense of good-natured flair!


At one of my first jobs, my lunch constantly disappeared from the community refrigerator. There were no clues and, being New York, “nobody saw nuttin!”

I tried marking my lunch. I tried notes pleading with people to not take my lunch. I tried hiding my lunch behind cans, etc. Nothing worked. One day, after my lunch disappeared, I shut the refrigerator door and laughed maniacally. Someone asked me what was so funny.

“Today is the day I find out who has been stealing my lunch,” I replied. “I put rat poison on my sandwich! We’ll find the thief in about an hour when he or she starts dying.”

Sure enough, a coworker screamed and ran around like she was on fire. As she was about to be taken to the hospital to have her stomach pumped, I laughed and admitted it wasn’t really poisoned. Naturally, I was fired. It didn’t matter that this woman had stolen my lunch for her mid-morning snack every day. It seems my “joke” was considered “dangerous” and I was chastised for possibly “giving (her) a heart attack.”

In one office, coworkers had small refrigerators in their cubicles to keep their lunch and drinks cold and safe. The energy bills must have been too much for the company so a memo went around informing people that these appliances were against the fire code. The kitchen refrigerator then became a repository of science experiments as people forgot half sandwiches and slabs of meatloaf for weeks and months. Sometimes you couldn’t even tell what was in the Tupperware it was so furry and moldy.

Being a smoker, I often found that people would pop into my cubicle to borrow my lighter, which sat out with my pack of cigarettes. Switching to gag lighter that gave those who pushed the button to light it a severe shock, I was once again chastised for a dangerous item that could “give someone a heart attack!”

Again, it would be a telltale sign of who was stealing my lighters. Sometimes there’s just no justice in the world and certainly not an office.

When you are hired by a large company or corporation, you are shown a video on office harassment. The video looks like a 1970s porn film without the sex. Bad acting and rhythmic guitar rifts, but the common thread throughout the video is that even when you are in the right, if someone complains about you, then you are guilty and wrong. With a small cast of characters in this video, it’s always the same person being offended by the actions of coworkers. One might wonder why the old rules of society aren’t followed and the constant complainer isn’t just buried up to his or her neck and hit in turn by every other employee with a polo mallet until dead. The modern office has a strange political hierarchy and it will not bend or break to your will or common sense. Learn to deal with it safely and with a sense of good-natured flair!

Save your lunch

And do it without the expense of poison and explosive booby traps that blow off human fingers! Try these sickening lunch bags with horrid mold or cockroaches printed on them.

Leer más “Products that help you survive office life”