The Brand New Printed Smashing Book: “The Mobile Book”


TABLE OF CONTENTS

When setting up the concept of the book, we worked hard to ensure a delicate balance between basic knowledge and the current state of the art. Please note that changes to chapter titles are still possible.

AUTHOR CHAPTER DETAILS
Jeremy Keith Foreword
Peter-Paul Koch What’s Going on in Mobile?
Stephanie Rieger The Future of Mobile
Trent Walton Responsive Design Strategies
Brad Frost Responsive Design Patterns
Dave Olsen Optimization For Mobile
Dennis Kardys Hands On Design for Mobile (UX Perspective)
Greg Nudelman
Rian van der Merwe
Mobile UX Design Patterns
Josh Clark Designing With Gestures and Touch

Jeremy Keith Peter-Paul Koch Stephanie Rieger Trent Walton Brad Frost Dave Olsen Dennis Kardys Greg Nudelman Rian van der Merwe Josh Clark
From left to right: Jeremy Keith, Peter-Paul Koch, Stephanie Rieger, Trent Walton, Brad Frost, Dave Olsen, Dennis Kardys, Greg Nudelman, Rian van der Merwe and Josh Clark.

 

What’s In The Book?

The Mobile Book

When it comes to mobile, there are more open questions than definitive answers. Due to its fragmentation, it’s not so easy to understand how the mobile market looks and works in general. How can you pick the right mobile strategy and select the right approach for your website? What design patterns and what UX techniques can assist you to design faster and more effectively for mobile devices? What design patterns do you need to be aware of when building responsive websites and what patterns will help you optimize the performance for mobile? When you design with mobile in mind, how exactly should your design process differ from a traditional design workflow?

Our new book attempts to answer these questions. Well-known experts such as Peter-Paul Koch, Stephanie Rieger, Trent Walton, Brad Frost, Dave Olsen, Josh Clark and Remy Sharp have contributed to the book to present the most relevant and valuable insights. To ensure the quality of the material, the chapters have been reviewed by Scott Jenson, Bryan Rieger, Tim Kadlec, Bruce Lawson and other active members of the mobile design community. The foreword was written by Jeremy Keith. It wasn’t easy to bring together such a stellar line-up of experts, but a compromise wasn’t an option.

 

UNDERSTANDING THE INTRICACIES OF THE MOBILE LANDSCAPE

In discussions about user experience on mobile, we tend to make general assumptions about the environment in which users will be using an app or a website on their mobile device. However, mobile context is a myth. We can’t make any realistic assumptions about the context because we just don’t know anything definite about it — when and how the device is used or what connectivity it currently has. Obviously we can plan for different scenarios — and so we should — but mobile context is often as unpredictable as particle physics. We just don’t know for sure when mobile devices are being used – on-the-go, in the kitchen, or when watching TV.

In the first chapter of the book, Peter-Paul Koch and Stephanie Rieger explore the mechanics of the mobile world and the ongoing developments in the industry.

“[We’ve had] a total of 880 million Android & iOS devices entering the market in just over five years. Consider the shift that occurs when iOS & Android put a combined billion [mobile] devices in people’s hands. That’s almost half the Internet population of the world and equivalent to the total number of (Windows) PCs in use around the world. Mobile first yet?”

— Luke Wroblewski

Mobile Landscape
The first chapter of our new “Mobile Book” describes the mobile landscape and provides insights about the future of mobile.

LEARN TO DEVELOP BETTER RESPONSIVE DESIGNS

As a result of random assumptions, we tend to think that mobile experiences should be the “light” versions of traditional “desktop” experiences — because well, that’s what users need. However, research shows that 80% of users want to have all “desktop” features on mobile — they want to be able to use the features everywhere, and in a similar way. That’s when meaningful, performance-optimized responsive design solutions become important. In thesecond chapter, Trent Walton introduces strategies for developing responsive websites, Brad Frost discusses emerging responsive design patterns and Dave Olsen explains what you need to know to optimize the performance of mobile websites. Leer más “The Brand New Printed Smashing Book: “The Mobile Book””

CSS Posters

I’ve always stressed the importance of practice and experimentation. If you want to get better at something or if you want to learn something, you have to keep on doing it over and over again. This is very true with web design as well. We’ve even published an article here on Design Informer about the benefits of experimentation.

I’m very busy as I work a full-time 9-6 job as a web designer, then I go home and work on Design Informer, soon to be Coding Informer, and I also do a variety of freelance work. With all these on my plate, it’s very hard to find time to relax, open up Photoshop and design, or open up Dreamweaver (code view of course) and just mess around with some code.
The Inspiration

A while back, I tweeted about this CSS experiment. Well yesterday, I had some free time on my hands and I decided to do some experimentation with CSS myself. We’ve all seen some amazing things done with CSS3 and I wanted to play around with it myself. I looked around first to see what else I can find that’s been done and I found some really great experiments.


CSS Posters

I’ve always stressed the importance of practice and experimentation. If you want to get better at something or if you want to learn something, you have to keep on doing it over and over again. This is very true with web design as well. We’ve even published an article here on Design Informer about the benefits of experimentation.

I’m very busy as I work a full-time 9-6 job as a web designer, then I go home and work on Design Informer, soon to be Coding Informer, and I also do a variety of freelance work. With all these on my plate, it’s very hard to find time to relax, open up Photoshop and design, or open up Dreamweaver (code view of course) and just mess around with some code.

The Inspiration

A while back, I tweeted about this CSS experiment. Well yesterday, I had some free time on my hands and I decided to do some experimentation with CSS myself. We’ve all seen some amazing things done with CSS3 and I wanted to play around with it myself. I looked around first to see what else I can find that’s been done and I found some really great experiments.

Click the images to view the actual CSS experiment… Leer más “CSS Posters”