5 Things You Can Learn By Quitting Your Job

Usually when you work full-time, you tend not to plan further ahead than next year’s summer vacation. Hell, most people abhor the idea of making 10- or 20-year plans, since they inevitably involve huge life-decisions and possibly admitting that one is caught in a rut as deep as the Grand Canyon. But like it or not, having a general idea of where you’re going (as well as at least rough plans B and C in case things go wrong) not only gives you confidence about what you’re doing, but also forces you to think about your priorities and ambitions. Planning ahead is always a good idea, even if you do change plans every two weeks.
3. Forget about what people think
Straying from your expected career path can bring out some surprising reactions in your friends and family. Concern, support, jealousy, happiness, anger, enthusiasm and negativity come forth, often from the most unexpected sources. A complete stranger applauds what you’ve done, whereas your best friend turns into a depressing black hole of negativity. Don’t take this as a litmus test of friendships (although it may serve as one), but rather just realize that you shouldn’t worry about what others think. At the end of the day, you need to make career decisions that make you happy, everything else is just noise.


 

pickthebrain.com

“Dear colleagues, after many rewarding years at CubicleSlave Inc, I have decided to move on…”

99,9% of corporate employees, at one time or another, think about leaving their jobs. Their dream may be to start a company, travel the world, write a novel, learn Japanese, meditate in an ashram, train for a marathon, study philosophy, lower their golf handicap, paint a masterpiece or star in a porno, but the first step is always the same: get the hell out of this job. My co-blogger and I felt much the same way about a year ago, and ended up leaving our consulting jobs to start our own company and blog, and in general to pursue a more balanced lifestyle. We now feel it’s our obligation to share what we’ve learned so far outside the cubicle…: Leer más “5 Things You Can Learn By Quitting Your Job”

Destacar por el formato o por el contenido | Consulta para consultores en RRHH

Tener un formato adecuado es un primer paso haciendo un CV atractivo. ¿Pero cual es el formato adecuado? Como diseñador gráfico esta claro que quieres enseñar tus calidades y tus cualificaciones ya con el CV. En este caso quizás puedes también añadir ejemplos de tus obras en algo parecido a un sedcard, lo que usan los modelos. Pero creo que la mayoría de nosotros no quiere trabajar como diseñador gráfico. Entonces, ¿cómo hacerlo mejor?

Desde mi punto de vista haca falta un formato adaptado a la industria y un contenido adaptado a las exigencias de un puesto, una industria o por ejemplo una empresa.

Entonces hay que reflexionar bien cuales son las exigencias del puesto de interés. Es un trabajo que necesita un poco de tiempo. ¿Cuales son las exigencias “duras” (hard facts) (formación, experiencia, certificados,…) y exigencias “suaves” (soft facts) (características del candidato)?
Con esto hecho se puede elaborar un CV adaptado a las exigencias del puesto usando un formato bien estructurado, preciso, fácil de leer, al grano, con espacio a un lado para tomar notas, ….
Y hablando de la foto, que se ponga una foto con por lo menos una pequeña sonrisa y ropa adecuada para el puesto.


20120326-091153.jpg

Buenos días a todos,
Últimamente se ve muchos CV’s muy bonitos, bien diseñados y “modernos”. Casi ya se puede hablar de obras de diseño.
Me pregunto si, aparte de ser bonito, un esfuerzo tan grande en el diseño vale la pena.
Sabemos todos que el CV es casi la única herramienta para pasar el primer obstáculo o filtro en el proceso de selección: llamar atención y atraer. Un diseño/formato muy bonito con colores diferentes, posicionamiento de la información de una manera diferente, diferentes letras, iconos etc. va a llamar la atención.
Y después? Leer más “Destacar por el formato o por el contenido | Consulta para consultores en RRHH”

The Simple Complexity of Outstanding Customer Service

But she could get by with the bare minimum. She could be pleasant but not super friendly. She could wait to be asked before providing a bunch of helpful information, or extras like looking at the availability of upgraded seats. She could seem like she’s doing her job competently, but she likely doesn’t get paid based on going above and beyond to be enthusiastic and proactively helpful.

Yet, she was. She clearly gets satisfaction out of being outstanding and helpful. And she absolutely MADE my morning of travel, putting me at ease and putting a smile on my face (which is a feat before I’ve had caffeine, as anyone who has encountered me in the morning can attest).

Outstanding customer service is not complicated. There was nothing particularly fancy here, no tricks or gimmicks or whizbang technology. But Fran was helpful, friendly, clearly enjoyed her job, and made me feel like she was glad I was there.

The problem is that these concepts are exceedingly simple, yet so few companies set the bar there. It’s not cheap nor easy to find the Frans of the world and keep them motivated, happy and continually rewarded for being exceptional, much less to have Fran at scale (it’s far easier in a concierge-like environment like this one). The basics aren’t necessarily sexy, or “viral”, or likely to make the media.

Moreover, when we find people like her, we promote them into management and remove them from the places where they can make an outstanding and direct difference, because our companies aren’t built to create authority, career development, and prestige in front-line roles.


brasstackthinking.com

The Simple Complexity of Outstanding Customer Service - Brass Tack ThinkingSomeone at American Airlines, please give Fran a raise.

I travel a lot, so I fork over the cash each year – about $500 – to be a member of American’s Admiral’s Club. It’s a nice little airline lounge that they have in a lot of major airports, including my home base of O’Hare, and it makes waiting for a flight easier with some snacks and beverages, free wifi, comfortable seats and plentiful outlets. Way worth the money in itself.

I walked in yesterday before my flight to Austin, and was greeted by Fran at the desk. I handed over my card so she could check me in, and she asked my destination.

With a big smile, Fran went on to say:

“Well, welcome Ms. Naslund. Flight 3600 is departing out of gate G13 today, and I currently show an aircraft on the ground and a crew checked in, so you should be all set for an on time departure. We’ll be boarding at about 9:15 and we’ll announce the flight as it comes up, and if there are any delays, I’ll let you know.

Now let me see if there might be any upgrades available….ah, unfortunately not today, but I do have a bulkhead seat held if you’d like that instead of your current seat assignment.”

(I accepted with gratitude…) Leer más “The Simple Complexity of Outstanding Customer Service”

Westin believes you’re overworked … and could use a hotel stay


By T.L. Stanley | http://www.brandfreak.com

WestinRoyal Caribbean already reminded us how overworked and underappreciated we are in this crappy economy. Now, it’s time for Westin Hotels to tell us bedraggled American drones just what that all-work, no-play attitude is doing to us: making us miserable, shortening our lives and ruining our marriages, that’s what. Yikes! Better get out of town! Westin’s new campaign urges people to take the time off that’s owed them—and, naturally, spend it at one of the marketer’s many fine properties. A Westin study found that 58 percent of those surveyed said they need more vacation time, and 64 percent have canceled trips because of work. The campaign, anchored by Westin’s Travel and Be Well site, aims to educate 9-to-5ers about the health benefits of vacations and nudges them to sign an online petition promising to use their company-paid time by the end of the year. Leer más “Westin believes you’re overworked … and could use a hotel stay”

EUROSTAR / CROWSOURCED GUIDE TO THE CONTINENT

London based social media specialists We Are Social have launched a crowd sourced platform that acts as a guide to all the European destinations accessible by their client Eurostar’s high speed rail service.

Serendipity is a big part of travel, whether it be finding a new restaurant tucked away off the Champs Elysée or renting a bike and cruising through the streets of Amsterdam. Sharing these finds is almost as fun as the discovery, and this is why the site exists, allowing travellers to submit their reviews of destinations around Europe. The end result will hopefully be a useful trip-planning resource for anyone thinking of journeying to the continent, a handy guide that fits perfectly with the brand’s new ‘Exploring is beautiful’ campaign, designed to inspire travellers to venture beyond Eurostar’s core destinations of Paris, Lille and Brussels.


London based social media specialists We Are Social have launched a crowd sourced platform that acts as a guide to all the European destinations accessible by their client Eurostar‘s high speed rail service.
Serendipity is a big part of travel, whether it be finding a new restaurant tucked away off the Champs Elysée or renting a bike and cruising through the streets of Amsterdam. Sharing these finds is almost as fun as the discovery, and this is why the site exists, allowing travellers to submit their reviews of destinations around Europe. The end result will hopefully be a useful trip-planning resource for anyone thinking of journeying to the continent, a handy guide that fits perfectly with the brand’s new ‘Exploring is beautiful’ campaign, designed to inspire travellers to venture beyond Eurostar’s core destinations of Paris, Lille and Brussels.

How to Budget and Track Expenses for Your Next Vacation

I recently discovered a neat — and free — online tool that will help you estimate, budget, and track your expenses for your next vacation. It’s aptly named Budget Your Trip.

Travel is one of those luxuries that, even on a budget, can be costly. It’s difficult to estimate what you’ll spend before you get there, tricky to monitor your expenditures mid-stream, and excruciating to curb your spending if you realize the budget is going off the rails. “I’m on vacation”, you justify, as you order that extra beer with dinner, figuring it will all come out in the wash (or at least you’ll be too drunk by the end of the night to care).

Instead of leaving your next vacation up to chance (and coming back broke and bitter about it), you can add some science to the exercise with the help of Budget Your Trip.


A symbol depicting a palm tree.
Image via Wikipedia

I recently discovered a neat — and free — online tool that will help you estimate, budget, and track your expenses for your next vacation. It’s aptly named Budget Your Trip.

Travel is one of those luxuries that, even on a budget, can be costly. It’s difficult to estimate what you’ll spend before you get there, tricky to monitor your expenditures mid-stream, and excruciating to curb your spending if you realize the budget is going off the rails. “I’m on vacation”, you justify, as you order that extra beer with dinner, figuring it will all come out in the wash (or at least you’ll be too drunk by the end of the night to care).

Instead of leaving your next vacation up to chance (and coming back broke and bitter about it), you can add some science to the exercise with the help of Budget Your Trip. Leer más “How to Budget and Track Expenses for Your Next Vacation”

With New Auto-Import Itinerary Feature For Gmail, TripIt Just Got Easier To Use

Just when you thoughtTripIt couldn’t get any easier to use, the startup has defied the impossible. The nifty site that creates customized travel itineraries from travel confirmation emails, is launching an auto-import feature for Gmail and Google Apps that will automatically read and import your travel emails to create and update itineraries on TripIt.

The feature essentially replaces needing to forward confirmation emails to plans@tripit.com. If you have a TripIt account you can register your Gmail or Google Apps account for the auto-import feature, allowing TripIt to automatically import your travel confirmation emails to create itineraries. The feature works across TripIt’s web platform and the startup’s apps for iPhone, Android and BlackBerry phones.



Just when you thoughtTripIt couldn’t get any easier to use, the startup has defied the impossible. The nifty site that creates customized travel itineraries from travel confirmation emails, is launching an auto-import feature for Gmail and Google Apps that will automatically read and import your travel emails to create and update itineraries on TripIt.

The feature essentially replaces needing to forward confirmation emails to plans@tripit.com. If you have a TripIt account you can register your Gmail or Google Apps account for the auto-import feature, allowing TripIt to automatically import your travel confirmation emails to create itineraries. The feature works across TripIt’s web platform and the startup’s apps for iPhone, Android and BlackBerry phones. Leer más “With New Auto-Import Itinerary Feature For Gmail, TripIt Just Got Easier To Use”