LooGix, herramienta web gratuita para crear gif animados en pocos pasos


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano the name of the game

Si quieres crear tus propias imágenes animadas, en formato gif, para enviar por email o compartir con tus amigos de las redes sociales, puedes hacerlo de forma muy sencilla con LooGix. Se trata de una utilidad web de uso gratuito, no hay que descargar ni instalar nada, donde con apenas unos clics tendrás lista tu animación. Leer más “LooGix, herramienta web gratuita para crear gif animados en pocos pasos”

3 Ways to Get More Time Out of Less


 |  | inc.com

You can achieve more in a constrained market without running your employees into the ground. These three steps will get your team focused on the work that really drives growth.

Across the country, businesses are being pushed to do more with less. Typically this has taken the shape of longer hours, later nights, and a big group of unhappy employees. Achieving in a constrained market should not mean spending more time at the office doing less exciting work; it means that you should stop wasting time.

There are three steps managers and staff can take toward a more efficient, more productive organization. By 1) identifying and focusing on your biggest priorities, 2) completing two objectives every week, and 3) outsourcing work, you will find a smoother running organization that employees are happy to contribute to every day.

1. Identify and focus on your biggest priorities. Leer más “3 Ways to Get More Time Out of Less”

When People Come and Go

Project teams often have different workers at different times. And that can create problems.

It’s tough for a team to deliver top performance when members keep coming and going. Constant turnover makes it hard to maintain team spirit—and the continuity of skills and knowledge necessary to get the job done.

But sometimes companies don’t have any choice but to keep shuffling the deck. Teams might need different workers at different stages of a project—designers at the start, for instance, and prototyping experts later on. Likewise, the team members may not all be available at the same time, or employees might constantly come and go because of layoffs or mergers.

Questions to Ask Yourself

1. Are you constantly shuffling people on and off teams in your company, either out of necessity or by design?
2. Do new team members take a long time to get up to speed?
3. Do longstanding team members resent the extra work it takes to get newcomers trained?
4. Do team members who are constantly shuffling from manager to manager complain about a lack of career oversight?
5. Overall, do you find that these unstable groups aren’t performing as well as they should?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you need to rethink how you set up and manage your teams. You should craft team roles that take little on-the-job training, and make it as easy as possible to slot people in and out. As part of that, you should come up with formalized procedures for employees to follow, making it easier to get newcomers up to speed. Finally, find ways to motivate workers who are always moving among teams, and help them identify with the organization and its goals—such as assigning them to a manager who oversees everyone at the company with similar skills, instead of bouncing them from boss to boss.

Some managers, meanwhile, want to keep team membership unstable on purpose. They may want to rotate employees in and out of groups to give them exposure to different parts of the business, or to cut down on theft or other bad behaviors that can develop when employees work together closely for a long time and turn a blind eye to each other’s misdeeds.

So, how can companies get the most out of teams under unstable conditions? Here’s a look at the most common problems that teams with fluid membership encounter—and the best ways to solve them.


By Gervase R. Bushe

Project teams often have different workers at different times. And that can create problems.


It’s tough for a team to deliver top performance when members keep coming and going. Constant turnover makes it hard to maintain team spirit—and the continuity of skills and knowledge necessary to get the job done.

But sometimes companies don’t have any choice but to keep shuffling the deck. Teams might need different workers at different stages of a project—designers at the start, for instance, and prototyping experts later on. Likewise, the team members may not all be available at the same time, or employees might constantly come and go because of layoffs or mergers.

Questions to Ask Yourself

  1. Are you constantly shuffling people on and off teams in your company, either out of necessity or by design?
  2. Do new team members take a long time to get up to speed?
  3. Do longstanding team members resent the extra work it takes to get newcomers trained?
  4. Do team members who are constantly shuffling from manager to manager complain about a lack of career oversight?
  5. Overall, do you find that these unstable groups aren’t performing as well as they should?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you need to rethink how you set up and manage your teams. You should craft team roles that take little on-the-job training, and make it as easy as possible to slot people in and out. As part of that, you should come up with formalized procedures for employees to follow, making it easier to get newcomers up to speed. Finally, find ways to motivate workers who are always moving among teams, and help them identify with the organization and its goals—such as assigning them to a manager who oversees everyone at the company with similar skills, instead of bouncing them from boss to boss.

Some managers, meanwhile, want to keep team membership unstable on purpose. They may want to rotate employees in and out of groups to give them exposure to different parts of the business, or to cut down on theft or other bad behaviors that can develop when employees work together closely for a long time and turn a blind eye to each other’s misdeeds.

So, how can companies get the most out of teams under unstable conditions? Here’s a look at the most common problems that teams with fluid membership encounter—and the best ways to solve them. Leer más “When People Come and Go”

Targeted Cognitive Exercises Improve Mental Abilities


Training with cognitive exercises can improve targeted mental functions, conclude the authors of a review article published recently in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia.  The authors (Kathryn Papp and Stephen Walsh from the University of Connecticut and Peter Snyder from Brown University) reviewed ten randomized controlled trials involving cognitive training interventions in healthy adults published since 1992.  They find that specific abilities such as memory, reasoning, and speed of processing can be improved through targeted training programs.  This is an important conclusion, and it is consistent with the growing evidence in support of the effectiveness of cognitive training. Leer más “Targeted Cognitive Exercises Improve Mental Abilities”