Graphene: The Next Wonder Material?


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

Graphene’s incredible properties come from the unique arrangement of its atoms. Graphene, like diamonds and coal, is made up entirely of carbon. But unlike those materials, graphene’s carbon atoms are arranged in two-dimensional sheets, making it incredibly strong and flexible. Since graphene also conducts electricity as well as copper, it could lead to flexible cell phone touchscreens and transparent, inexpensive solar cells. Ongoing advances in manufacturing graphene are bringing these and other devices closer to reality.

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Its about people not devices

We live in exciting times. Times of innovation, invention, and rapid change. Technologies that were unthinkable years ago are now commonplace. Close to 1.5 billion people worldwide use a computer, but that figure pales in comparison to the 4.2 billion (75% of the planet) who use or have access to a mobile phone.

If you’re new to mobile design (and most people are), you may be looking for guidelines or best practices to inform your work. When you find them, they will most likely sound something like this:

* Mobile is different from traditional (primarily desktop) computing.
* The desktop is about broadband, big displays, full attention, a mouse, keyboard and comfortable seating. Mobile is about poor connections, small screens, one-handed use, glancing, interruptions, and (lately), touch screens.
* You may spend hours seated in front of the same computer, but mobile context is ever-changing. This impacts (amongst other things) the users’ locations, their attention, their access to stable connectivity, and the orientation of their devices.
* Desktop computers are ideal for consumption of lengthy content and completion of complex interactions. Mobile interactions and content should be simple, focused, and should (where possible) take advantage of unique and useful device capabilities.
* Mobile devices are personal, often carrying a wealth of photos, private data, and treasured memories. This creates unique opportunities, but privacy is also a real concern.
* There are many mobile platforms, each with its own patterns and constraints. The more you understand each platform, the better you can design for it.
* And then there are tablets. As you may have noticed, they’re larger than your average mobile device. We’re also told they’re ideal for reading.

Designing for mobile without an understanding of these key differences can lead to all sorts of problems, including clumsy interactions, high latency, poor usability, and more than a few missed opportunities to create that “long wow.” The problem however is that while these unique mobile characteristics are correct, our very concept of what constitutes a mobile device (and therefore mobile behavior) is constantly evolving.


http://www.uxbooth.com/blog/its-about-people-not-devices/

This post is part of a series authored by the speakers of the upcoming UX London conference. As media sponsors, we’re proud to provide exclusive introductions to the topics that will comprise the event!

We live in exciting times. Times of innovation, invention, and rapid change. Technologies that were unthinkable years ago are now commonplace. Close to 1.5 billion people worldwide use a computer, but that figure pales in comparison to the 4.2 billion (75% of the planet) who use or have access to a mobile phone.

If you’re new to mobile design (and most people are), you may be looking for guidelines or best practices to inform your work. When you find them, they will most likely sound something like this:

  • Mobile is different from traditional (primarily desktop) computing.
  • The desktop is about broadband, big displays, full attention, a mouse, keyboard and comfortable seating. Mobile is about poor connections, small screens, one-handed use, glancing, interruptions, and (lately), touch screens.
  • You may spend hours seated in front of the same computer, but mobile context is ever-changing. This impacts (amongst other things) the users’ locations, their attention, their access to stable connectivity, and the orientation of their devices.
  • Desktop computers are ideal for consumption of lengthy content and completion of complex interactions. Mobile interactions and content should be simple, focused, and should (where possible) take advantage of unique and useful device capabilities.
  • Mobile devices are personal, often carrying a wealth of photos, private data, and treasured memories. This creates unique opportunities, but privacy is also a real concern.
  • There are many mobile platforms, each with its own patterns and constraints. The more you understand each platform, the better you can design for it.
  • And then there are tablets. As you may have noticed, they’re larger than your average mobile device. We’re also told they’re ideal for reading.

Designing for mobile without an understanding of these key differences can lead to all sorts of problems, including clumsy interactions, high latency, poor usability, and more than a few missed opportunities to create that “long wow.” The problem however is that while these unique mobile characteristics are correct, our very concept of what constitutes a mobile device (and therefore mobile behavior) is constantly evolving. Leer más “Its about people not devices”

Apple Patents a Desktop Touch-Screen Computer

It was only a matter of time.

You can touch your iPod, changing songs with the swipe of a finger. You can touch your iPhone, clicking away on a virtual keyboard or zooming into images and maps. You can touch your iPad, flipping though a book or digital magazine or playing games on the nine-inch screen. So it only makes sense that you should be able to touch your iMac.

A European patent uncovered by the blog Patently Apple indicates that Apple could bring multitouch to the desktop, giving computer users the ability to touch the screen of the display in addition to the computer’s keyboard.

The patent shows a series of sensors that could be added to a standard iMac, including an accelerometer to detect the angle of the screen and in turn change the display’s resolution or orientation.


By NICK BILTON

The United States Patent and Trademark Office via patentlyapple.com An Apple patent offers clues to a possible new iMac with a touch screen and iOS interface.

Touchscreen iMac

It was only a matter of time.

You can touch your iPod, changing songs with the swipe of a finger. You can touch your iPhone, clicking away on a virtual keyboard or zooming into images and maps. You can touch your iPad, flipping though a book or digital magazine or playing games on the nine-inch screen. So it only makes sense that you should be able to touch your iMac.

A European patent uncovered by the blog Patently Apple indicates that Apple could bring multitouch to the desktop, giving computer users the ability to touch the screen of the display in addition to the computer’s keyboard.

The patent shows a series of sensors that could be added to a standard iMac, including an accelerometer to detect the angle of the screen and in turn change the display’s resolution or orientation. Leer más “Apple Patents a Desktop Touch-Screen Computer”

Miracle Film Turns Any Surface into a Touchscreen

Here’s one for all you lovers of futuristic interfaces. An interactive hardware company called Displax has begun marketing Skin, a paper-thin, flexible film that would transform any non-metal surface into an interactive touchscreen.

You could place Skin on any surface, transparent or opaque, flat or curved, and use it to display any interactive content you like. Displax’s multi-touch technology can detect up to 16 fingers at once and can also detect air movement.

Skin is completely transparent and works on surfaces that are also transparent; you can place Skin on a glass surface and interact with content displayed under the glass.

This unique hardware operates via a grid of nanowires embedded Skin’s polymer film. Each time a user makes contact with the surface, either by blowing on it or directly touching it, “a small electrical disturbance is detected allowing the micro-processor controller to pinpoint the movement or direction of the air flow,” according to Displax.


Jolie O’Dell

Here’s one for all you lovers of futuristic interfaces. An interactive hardware company called Displax has begun marketing Skin, a paper-thin, flexible film that would transform any non-metal surface into an interactive touchscreen.

You could place Skin on any surface, transparent or opaque, flat or curved, and use it to display any interactive content you like. Displax’s multi-touch technology can detect up to 16 fingers at once and can also detect air movement.

Skin is completely transparent and works on surfaces that are also transparent; you can place Skin on a glass surface and interact with content displayed under the glass.

This unique hardware operates via a grid of nanowires embedded Skin’s polymer film. Each time a user makes contact with the surface, either by blowing on it or directly touching it, “a small electrical disturbance is detected allowing the micro-processor controller to pinpoint the movement or direction of the air flow,” according to Displax. Leer más “Miracle Film Turns Any Surface into a Touchscreen”

The Rise of Text Messaging [INFOGRAPHIC]

Shane Snow

This series is brought to you by the new BlackBerry Torch, the touch screen BlackBerry complete with social feeds, improved internet browsing, and much more.

Text messaging is one of the most popular communication methods in the world. The cost of a cell phone and SMS plan compared to that of a computer and a broadband connection has made texting extremely popular in developing countries, and “unlimited messaging” plans have made it the communication medium of choice for teens everywhere (beating face-to-face conversation and e-mail in popularity).

Before the rise of Twitter (Twitter), texting was the original short-form messaging art, with participants in every age demographic. Even as smartphones (with e-mail and web capabilities) become more popular, SMS remains the baseline of mobile digital communication, and permeates nearly every social group.

The following infographic illustrates the trends and averages for texting in the United States and around the world. How do you and your texting habits compare?

Let us know in the comments how your texting habits compare to the trends and averages in the infographic above.


Shane Snow

This series is brought to you by the new BlackBerry Torch, the touch screen BlackBerry complete with social feeds, improved internet browsing, and much more.

Text messaging is one of the most popular communication methods in the world. The cost of a cell phone and SMS plan compared to that of a computer and a broadband connection has made texting extremely popular in developing countries, and “unlimited messaging” plans have made it the communication medium of choice for teens everywhere (beating face-to-face conversation and e-mail in popularity).

Before the rise of Twitter (Twitter), texting was the original short-form messaging art, with participants in every age demographic. Even as smartphones (with e-mail and web capabilities) become more popular, SMS remains the baseline of mobile digital communication, and permeates nearly every social group.

The following infographic illustrates the trends and averages for texting in the United States and around the world. How do you and your texting habits compare?

Let us know in the comments how your texting habits compare to the trends and averages in the infographic above. Leer más “The Rise of Text Messaging [INFOGRAPHIC]”

Stan Schroeder Nokia X3: Where Touchscreen and Keypad Meet

Nokia has a new feature phone out, Nokia X3, and its claim to fame is something Nokia calls Touch and Type: a rarely seen combination between a touchscreen and a fairly standard 16-button keypad. Nokia calls the phone X3, but to differ from the earlier Nokia phones by the same name, it also goes by the name Nokia X3-02.

Feature-wise, it’s a fairly standard mid-range phone, with a 5-megapixel camera, 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.1, music player and FM radio. It sports a 9.6mm thick, brushed aluminum casing, available in five colors.


Stan Schroeder

Nokia has a new feature phone out, Nokia X3, and its claim to fame is something Nokia calls Touch and Type: a rarely seen combination between a touchscreen and a fairly standard 16-button keypad. Nokia calls the phone X3, but to differ from the earlier Nokia phones by the same name, it also goes by the name Nokia X3-02.

Feature-wise, it’s a fairly standard mid-range phone, with a 5-megapixel camera, 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.1, music player and FM radio. It sports a 9.6mm thick, brushed aluminum casing, available in five colors. Leer más “Stan Schroeder Nokia X3: Where Touchscreen and Keypad Meet”

Face-off: 1979 Apple Graphics Tablet vs. 2010 Apple iPad

The Apple Graphics Tablet (left) was released in 1979 and cost $650. It connects to any Apple II and can be used to draw images at a resolution of 280 by 192 pixels. The tablet draws power directly from the Apple II and cannot be used when disconnected.

The Apple II was originally designed to be used with televisions rather than computer monitors, but the Apple Graphics Tablet produced interference that could disrupt reception of television signals. A later model was identical to its predecessor except for one notable new feature: FCC compliance.

The Apple iPad (right) was released in 2010 in six models ranging from $499 to $829. Equipped with a 1-GHz A4 system-on-a-chip and a 16GB, 32GB or 64GB flash drive, it syncs with any Macintosh or Windows machine capable of running iTunes and can run thousands of iOS applications. Its resolution is 1024 by 768 pixels on a 9.7-in. LED-backlit glossy widescreen display.


30-year-old technology struts its stuff beside today’s state-of-the-art tablet computer

By Ken Gagne

old and new Apple logos When Apple launched the iPad earlier this year, it was the culmination of fans’ long wait for the company to enter the tablet computer market. There’s no doubt that Apple‘s iPad is a revolutionary computing device that’s ushering in a new era of tablet computing.

But in 1979, an earlier generation of Apple users used a different kind of Apple tablet, back when the word meant something else entirely.

The Apple Graphics Tablet was designed by Summagraphics and sold by Apple Computer Inc. for the Apple II personal microcomputer. (Summagraphics also marketed the device for other platforms as the BitPad.) To be clear, this tablet was not a stand-alone computing device like the iPad. Instead, it was an input device for creating images on the Apple II’s screen, and it predated the Apple II’s mouse by six years.

Apple II fan Tony Diaz had an Apple Graphics Tablet on hand at last month’s KansasFest, an annual convention for diehard Apple II users. He and Computerworld‘s Ken Gagne, the event’s marketing director, compared and contrasted Apple’s original tablet with the iPad, snapping photos as they went.

Despite the three decades of technology advancements that separate the two devices, some fun comparisons are still possible. Join us for a photo face-off between the two tablets.

Meet the tablets

Apple II Graphics Tablet and iPad side by side

The Apple Graphics Tablet (left) was released in 1979 and cost $650. It connects to any Apple II and can be used to draw images at a resolution of 280 by 192 pixels. The tablet draws power directly from the Apple II and cannot be used when disconnected.

The Apple II was originally designed to be used with televisions rather than computer monitors, but the Apple Graphics Tablet produced interference that could disrupt reception of television signals. A later model was identical to its predecessor except for one notable new feature: FCC compliance.

The Apple iPad (right) was released in 2010 in six models ranging from $499 to $829. Equipped with a 1-GHz A4 system-on-a-chip and a 16GB, 32GB or 64GB flash drive, it syncs with any Macintosh or Windows machine capable of running iTunes and can run thousands of iOS applications. Its resolution is 1024 by 768 pixels on a 9.7-in. LED-backlit glossy widescreen display. Leer más “Face-off: 1979 Apple Graphics Tablet vs. 2010 Apple iPad”