7 websites that make life on the road easy


Business travel may or may not be better than it was 30 years ago, but the process for arranging flights and hotels today is immeasurably better than it was in the supposed good old days.

Via Bizjournal

Back in 1983, we had exactly one computerized tool, the Official Airline Guide Electronic Edition. Created for first-generation IBM personal computers, the OAG Electronic Edition spit out endless lines of code to represent flights, arrival and departure times and prices. And unless you knew the undocumented secret (the number “99” appended to end of a command line), you couldn’t display all of your fare options in a single session.

Websites like Kayak.com, which help travelers compare air fares, are just one of many online tools that make it easier for road warriors to operate while away from home.

Throw in dial-up modems, 5.25-inch floppy drives and a 10-cent-a-minute charge to access the Electronic Edition and you’re talking the business-travel equivalent of stone knives and bear skins.

Today we’re spoiled for choices to make our planning better. So much choice, in fact, that we’re almost paralyzed by the cornucopia of data at our fingertips and accessible via smartphones, tablets, laptops or our latest-generation PC. I sometimes yearn for the wonky excitement I felt when I first accessed schedules on a tiny, monochrome screen, but, overall, I prefer to use these seven sites to make my life on the road in 2013 a bit easier.

Kayak.com for fare information

The Net teems with sites that claim to beat the airlines at their own fare games. Most can’t. But I find Kayak.com fantastically flexible as a fare-compare tool. You can filter prices by number of stops and connections (useful if you’re looking for a bargain on international premium-class travel); take-off and landing times; by any combination of carriers you choose; aircraft type; and, most creatively, by an airline’s membership in a global alliance.

Best of all, I find Kayak’s layout and displays comparatively clean and intuitive. I say comparatively because every traveler’s idea of clean and simple will vary. Kayak isn’t perfectit recently refused to show Porter Airlines on a itinerary between New York and Porter’s Toronto hubbut no third-party site is. If Kayak isn’t to your fare-compare tastes, try the relatively obscure Dohop.com or the better known Matrix offered by Google’s ITA Software.

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Konekt.me Is A LinkedIn For Creative Professionals | techcrunch.com


Screen Shot 2012-11-09 at 8.58.37 AM

There are plenty of resources on the Internet to maintain a professional profile. LinkedIn is the most prominent, but none really cater specifically to the creative professional. But a startup out of Toronto, Canada, is ready to give artists, writers, photographers, directors, musicians, and anyone else who considers their work a labor of artistic love a new way to easily display their work in a clean format on the web.

Meet Konekt.me.

The site lets you add content in seconds by simply choosing the type of content (a link, a SoundCloud clip, a YouTube video, etc.) and adding the proper URL. Konekt.me automatically embeds the information in a slick, organized layout.

You can also bundle work into separate collections, which may signify different positions you held, types of work, or simply certain themes. It’s all up to you. Within each collection, individual work is displayed.

Co-founders Neil Martin, Jeffrey Howard and Rares Crisan explain to me that, while most creatives have plenty of work to show off, not all of them are fluent in the language of site design. In fact, many end up abandoning a personal blog out of frustration or simply a lack of time.Konekt.me allows a videographer or singer/songwriter to get their work up on the Internet in a beautiful way without spending more than a few hot seconds on it. If you don’t believe me just check out the video below.

The service is still in private beta, but the team was kind enough to give you fine TechCrunch readers an early access code to join the beta testing. Simply enter the code “TCEXCLUSIVE” when you register at Konekt.me.

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Netflix caught hiring actors to pose as fans at events in Canada


By David Kiefaber | http://www.brandfreak.com

Netflix

Netflix’s arrival in Canada, already a mixed bag in terms of public perception, sank into further ignominy when the company admitted to hiring actors to pose as enthusiastic Netflix fans in front of the Toronto press. The actors were encouraged to play “types” corresponding to Netflix’s core demographics, including “mothers, film buffs, tech geeks and couch potatoes,” The New York Times reports. I could be insulted by their typecasting, but admittedly I’m half of those things, and I use Netflix. Of course, I use the American version. Canada’s wonky copyright laws, which apparently restrict them from enjoying streaming sites like Hulu, mean a small selection of movies for the Great White North. That’s gone over about as well as you’d expect. So, it looks even worse for Netflix that they drummed up all this publicity for a service that’ll be subpar until they get rights worked out with the appropriate parties. On the other hand, while what they did was unethical and stupid, it wasn’t illegal. They still have a long way to go before usurping Comcast’s title as king of the shitheels.

Upcoming Web Design and Development Conferences in 2010

At the end of last year, we published a comprehensive list of web design and development conferences that might be of interest to Smashing Magazine’s diverse readership. Many readers commented and added links to other conferences and events that weren’t listed, some of which were added to the post. Using the contents of that list along with some other sources, we’ve compiled a list of web design and development-related conferences and events that will be taking place in the next six to eight months.

As always, there is no way for us to be able to include every possible event here, but we’ll be glad to update the list if you provide a comment to an upcoming event that you feel would be of interest to graphic designers or web developers.


At the end of last year, we published a comprehensive list of web design and development conferences that might be of interest to Smashing Magazine’s diverse readership. Many readers commented and added links to other conferences and events that weren’t listed, some of which were added to the post. Using the contents of that list along with some other sources, we’ve compiled a list of web design and development-related conferences and events that will be taking place in the next six to eight months.

As always, there is no way for us to be able to include every possible event here, but we’ll be glad to update the list if you provide a comment to an upcoming event that you feel would be of interest to graphic designers or web developers.

While the previous roundup was organized by category, this one lists the events in chronological order starting with the earliest. Jump to an appropriate month using the links below:

September 2010 Events

FITC Mobile 2010
FITC Mobile covers all aspects of mobile content development — with presentations, demonstrations, and panel discussions. Covering iPhone/iPad, Android, Flash 10.1, Windows Mobile, HTML5, Unity, Marketing, Usability, and other relevant topics in the mobile world.

When: September 16-18, 2010
Where: Toronto, ON, Canada at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre

Fitcm-2010 in Upcoming Web Design and Development Conferences in 2010

An Event Apart D.C.
“From the makers of A List Apart, An Event Apart is an intensely educational two-day conference for passionate practitioners of standards-based web design. If you care about code as well as content, usability as well as design, An Event Apart is the conference you’ve been waiting for.”

When: September 16-18, 2010
Where: Washington, D.C., USA at the Washington Hilton

Aea-2010 in Upcoming Web Design and Development Conferences in 2010

London Design Festival
“The London Design Festival is a nine-day celebration of design in the world’s creative capital. The Festival is a platform for the widest spectrum of design disciplines, brought together as a unique and accessible programme.”

When: September 18-26, 2010
Where: London, UK at a number of different venues across the city

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LinkedIn Hires Ex-Google Exec As Canada Head

Move said to be “significant milestone in our international growth”
By Doug Caverly

Anyone who considered LinkedIn’s physical expansion into Canada an odd or ill-thought-out move may want to think again. LinkedIn has been able to secure Jonathan Lister, the former country manager of Google Canada, as its own country manager in Canada.

LinkedInLister will be responsible for establishing LinkedIn’s first Canadian office, which will be located in Toronto. Then he’ll focus on finding more users, more partners, and more advertisers, among other things.


Move said to be “significant milestone in our international growth”
By Doug Caverly

Anyone who considered LinkedIn‘s physical expansion into Canada an odd or ill-thought-out move may want to think again.  LinkedIn has been able to secure Jonathan Lister, the former country manager of Google Canada, as its own country manager in Canada.

LinkedInLister will be responsible for establishing LinkedIn’s first Canadian office, which will be located in Toronto.  Then he’ll focus on finding more users, more partners, and more advertisers, among other things.
Leer más “LinkedIn Hires Ex-Google Exec As Canada Head”

AdFreak / Latest freak


Stella looks at dying art of hand-painted ads

Up-there

Mother in New York hosted a screening of its short film Up There for Stella Artois at the Grand Hotel on Thursday night. The 13-minute film (embedded after the jump) profiles the waning art of hand-painted advertising while chronicling a 21-day project during which artists from Sky High Murals painted the Belgian beer brand’s “pouring ritual” on a 20-by-50-foot wall in SoHo. The documentary short, directed by Mekanism’s Malcolm Murray, shows the painters, including retired artist Bob Middleton of Mack Sign Company, talking about the years it takes to perfect their artistry. By the time some of the young guys in the film become masters, there may not be much work left for them. So, take a minute to look up and check out the real thing the next time you pass a painted original. It’s advertising’s high art. (Sorry, couldn’t resist.)

—Posted by Eleftheria Parpis

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Hide your incontinence, or not, with Depend

Depends

Here’s the new JWT campaign for Depend adult undergarments. The ads exploit the shame and fear people feel about their incontinence—in particular, about other people finding out about it—under the theme “People know.” But of course, the ads explain that while people can know everything else about you, they don’t have to know about your “condition” (though if you really want to keep it a secret, you shouldn’t leave giant packs of Depends lying around, as the characters in the ads do). See one more TV spot after the jump, along with some print work.

—Posted by Tim Nudd

Click to read more …

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Dishwashing soap targeting snowperson set

Magistral- Snowman

Grey Argentina’s Pygmalion-esque ad for Magistral dishwashing soap is well made, but the sudden, heartbreaking finish is cheapened somewhat by the glib tagline. You’d also think the snowman would have had the boiler removed from his house sometime in the distant past, before he went to all the work of building his one true love and having her do his housework. Forgive me, but examining this ad’s internal logic is the only thing keeping me from sobbing like a child on repeat viewings.

—Posted by David Kiefaber

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Ohio not drooling over breast-milk billboard

Breast-milk-satisfies

You can always count on the topic of breastfeeding to spark thoughtful and measured debate—or else hysterical attacks and counterattacks. The latest skirmish in the breastfeeding vs. bottle feeding war is being fought in Ohio, where billboards like the one shown here, from the state health department, have been spotted around Cleveland and Toledo and probably elsewhere. Sure, there’s the implication that formula doesn’t satisfy—but the bigger issue here seems to be just what the heck is up with that baby? One local tells Toledo’s Fox affiliate: “When I first saw it, I thought, you know, I agree with breast milk, it’s fine, but then I saw it with the milk around its mouth and I thought that was so unappealing. The baby’s cute, but I did not like the milk coming out of his mouth.” Cleveland Scene readers are more straightforward. Says one: “The little fella looks SATISFIED AS HELL—like a tit vampire with all the drool and boob milk dripping off his chin.” The Ad Council’s breastfeeding campaign seems boring by comparison. Via @rickuldricks.

—Posted by Tim Nudd

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Quaker Crispy Minis give you strange burps

Quaker-Crispy-Minis

What was BBDO Toronto trying to communicate in this Quaker Crispy Minis spot? Would the prospect of burping butterflies make you want to buy the product? Is each box full of insect larva that mature in your intestines? Sure, that’s a good thing to serve your enemies, but friends are likely to take offense. In the ad’s boardroom scene, a female exec emits gobs of sparkly confetti during her pie-chart presentation. The other corporate drones look like they’d rubber-stamp whatever she’s proposing just to get the hell out of there. Strange, I never get my way at AdFreak no matter what I spew at our editorial meetings.

—Posted by David Gianatasio

http://adweek.blogs.com/adfreak/

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