Three-quarters of Americans have been confused by ads on TV

I’ve been saying for a while now that “brand awareness” is a limited goal all by itself, especially in a grim economic climate where people are watching what they buy for entirely practical reasons. They need to know what it is they’re getting and why it matters, and how using it will impress other people (a sad but enduring truism of advertising). Besides, if we’re going to be surrounded by ads everywhere we go, they might as well be useful.


By David Kiefaber

ConfusedAccording to an AdweekMedia/Harris Poll, 75 percent of Americans have been confused by ads on television. This is readily apparent if you’re an ad blogger like me, but it’s not as serious as you’d think once the numbers are broken down. One curious result of the study is how little education matters to the final tally. College and graduate students are just as likely to be confused by advertising as people whose formal education ended in high school, so either we’re all getting dumber (possible!) or marketers have gotten too cute with their concepts at the expense of content, usually by overestimating their aptitude for absurdist humor or social-media navigation. Leer más “Three-quarters of Americans have been confused by ads on TV”

Tobacco firms ‘may be illicitly advertising on YouTube’

A New Zealand researcher is claiming that the tobacco industry may be using YouTube to push its products surreptitiously.

Dr George Thomson of the University of Otago says that despite vehement denials and a voluntary industry agreement, tobacco companies may be uploading videos with pro-smoking content.

YouTube says it doesn’t accept paid-for tobacco advertising, but it doesn’t ban smoking related content.

Thomson searched through the first 20 pages of video clips containing any reference to five tobacco brands – Marlboro and L&M, marketed by Philip Morris; Benson and Hedges, marketed by both British American Tobacco and Gallagher; and Winston and Mild Seven, marketed by Japan Tobacco and Reynolds.


A New Zealand researcher is claiming that the tobacco industry may be using YouTube to push its products surreptitiously.

Dr George Thomson of the University of Otago says that despite vehement denials and a voluntary industry agreement, tobacco companies may be uploading videos with pro-smoking content.

YouTube says it doesn’t accept paid-for tobacco advertising, but it doesn’t ban smoking related content.

Thomson searched through the first 20 pages of video clips containing any reference to five tobacco brands – Marlboro and L&M, marketed by Philip Morris; Benson and Hedges, marketed by both British American Tobacco and Gallagher; and Winston and Mild Seven, marketed by Japan Tobacco and Reynolds.

The team analyzed 163 clips altogether – and say more than 20 appeared to be “very professionally made”.

Almost three quarters of the content found was classified as pro-tobacco, with less than four percent classified as anti.Seventy percent of the clips contained brand images of people smoking branded tobacco products, and most had brand content or the brand name actually in the title. Leer más “Tobacco firms ‘may be illicitly advertising on YouTube’”

Ferrari es acusado de usar publicidad subliminal por un logo de Marlboro

El equipo de Fórmula Uno Marlboro ha sido acusado por la Unión Europea de utilizar publicidad subliminal de una marca de cigarrillos por incluir en el monoplaza un logo simulado de la marca.

El logo en cuestión está basado en el que utiliza la marca pero no tiene elementos que permitan identificarlo como tan, sino que es un recuerdo visual del mismo, por el cual Marlboro pagó 100 millones de euros.


El equipo de Fórmula Uno Marlboro ha sido acusado por la Unión Europea de utilizar publicidad subliminal de una marca de cigarrillos por incluir en el monoplaza un logo simulado de la marca.

El logo en cuestión está basado en el que utiliza la marca pero no tiene elementos que permitan identificarlo como tan, sino que es un recuerdo visual del mismo, por el cual Marlboro pagó 100 millones de euros. Leer más “Ferrari es acusado de usar publicidad subliminal por un logo de Marlboro”