Estados Unidos: exhiben la colección más grande de joyas del Titanic


Con motivo del centenario del aniversario de su hundimiento, se realizá una exposición de anillos de diamantes y zafiros, entre otras, que recorrerá tres ciudades

La colección más grande de joyas. Así presentan la exhibición, por primera a vez abierta al público, de las alhajas recuperas del Titanic. En el aniversario por su centenario , las piezas empezaron su recorrido por la ciudad estadounidense de Atlanta, para luego continuar su recorrido por Orlando, Florida, y Las Vegas.

Un anillo con tres diamantes que forma parte de la exhibición de los objetos rescatados del naufragio del Titanic.  Foto: Reuters
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Anillos de diamantes y zafiros, broches, collares, mancuernillas y un reloj de bolsillo hecho de oro son algunas de las perlas que se podrán observar en la muestra. Las piezas fueron recuperadas de un solo bolso de mano hallado durante una misión de exploración y recuperación en 1987.

“El propósito de la exhibición es ilustrar al público sobre la maravilla de la exploración, dijo Alexandra Klingelhofer, vicepresidenta de colecciones para RMS Titanic Inc. Y agregó: “Podemos darles un vistazo de cómo debe haber sido al abrir esto por primera vez y ver, juntos, la bella joyería del periodo eduardiano”.

Los conservadores y curadores han estado estudiando y preservando estas piezas de joyería para tener un mayor conocimiento de la vida individual de los pasajeros.

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Why We Can’t See What’s Right in Front of Us


Tony McCaffrey

TONY MCCAFFREY

http://blogs.hbr.org/

Tony McCaffrey developed the Obscure Features Hypothesis for innovation as his dissertation in cognitive psychology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is currently funded by the National Science Foundation’s Center for e-Design to implement his innovation-enhancing techniques in software. Beta testing will begin in summer 2012.

The most famous cognitive obstacle to innovation is functional fixedness — an idea first articulated in the 1930s by Karl Duncker — in which people tend to fixate on the common use of an object. For example, the people on the Titanic overlooked the possibility that the iceberg could have been their lifeboat. Newspapers from the time estimated the size of the iceberg to be between 50-100 feet high and 200-400 feet long. Titanic was navigable for awhile and could have pulled aside the iceberg. Many people could have climbed aboard it to find flat places to stay out of the water for the four hours before help arrived. Fixated on the fact that icebergs sink ships, people overlooked the size and shape of the iceberg (plus the fact that it would not sink).

More mundane examples: in a pinch, people have trouble seeing that a plastic lawn chair could be used as a paddle (turn it over, grab two legs, and start rowing) or that a candle wick could be used to tie things together (scrape the wax away to free the string).

The problem is we tend to just see an object’s use, not the object itself. When we see a common object, the motor cortex of our brain activates in anticipation of using the object in the common way. Part of the meaning of an object is getting ready to use it. If a type of feature is not important for its common use, then we are not cognizant of it. The result: our brain’s incredible inertia to move toward the common. Efficient for everyday life, this automatic neural response is the enemy of innovation. Leer más “Why We Can’t See What’s Right in Front of Us”

El director James Cameron inicia su descenso al Pacífico

l director de cine canadiense James Cameron, responsable de títulos como ‘Avatar’, ‘Titanic’ y ‘Abyss’, ha iniciado su descenso a la Fosa de las Marianas, en las profundidades del Océano Pacífico, ha anunciado National Geographic.

Cameron “ha comenzado su descenso hacia la zona más profunda del océano”, ha revelado a través de ‘tuit’ National Geographic, que dirige laexpedición Deepsea Challenge hasta el confín de la corteza terrestre, que se encuentra 11,2 kilometros por debajo del nivel del mar.


OCEANOGRAFÍA | Expedición Deepsea ChallengeJames Cameron, durante la prueba del sumergible 'Deepsea Challenger' en Australia. | Efe

James Cameron, durante la prueba del sumergible ‘Deepsea Challenger’ en Australia. | Efe

El director de cine canadiense James Cameron, responsable de títulos como ‘Avatar’, ‘Titanic’ y ‘Abyss’, ha iniciado su descenso a la Fosa de las Marianas, en las profundidades del Océano Pacífico, ha anunciado National Geographic. Leer más “El director James Cameron inicia su descenso al Pacífico”

31+ Great Iconic Photos from History ###RECOMENDADO###

31+ Great Iconic Photos from History


http://www.stumbleupon.com

The Titanic before sailing.

The First McDonalds ever

Che and Fidel

Early construction of Brasilia, capital of Brasil

Papal Nuncio Cesare Orsenigo..

Elvis in the Army

The Beatles before they became famous

The Titanic in the bottom of the sea

Construction of Disneyland.

Leer más “31+ Great Iconic Photos from History ###RECOMENDADO###”

Explore the Titanic Wreck Site via Social Media [EXCLUSIVE]

A team of archaeologists, scientists and oceanographers will soon be revisiting the wreck of the Titanic for further scientific discovery and documentation. The entire process will be shared in near real-time with the world via social media.

The mission, Expedition Titanic, is meant to not only preserve the iconic ship — disintegrating two and half miles beneath the sea — but also to expose the wreck site to the public for the first time.

It’s a scientific undertaking like no other, but one with a very modern twist that relies heavily on social media to share the mission with the world.

The video below briefly introduces the mission behind the expedition.
The Mission: Virtually Raise the Titanic

The digital journey is the result of a partnership between RMS Titanic, Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Premier Exhibitions, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Waitt Institute. The expert dive doesn’t officially kick off until August 22, but the site is live and should help build anticipation for the upcoming deep sea trek.

The Expedition Titanic launched late last night, and those curious about the research initiative can already use the interactive flash-based site to virtually dive down to the ocean floor and explore the ship’s remains for themselves.

At its core, Expedition Titanic is designed to give those at home a lens through which to see what the experts are seeing. After taking the 3D-animated journey down to the wreck site, visitors can explore the wreck site map, check out video and images that will be shared from the dive in near real time, and control a close-up 360 degree view of the equipment used for mapping the Titanic’s final resting place. There’s also informational tidbits scattered throughout the site, messages from team members and eventually a 3D model of the ship.

Chris Greco, vice president of digital at Premier Exhibitions, explains that Expedition Titanic aims to “capture the entire wreck site,” something that has never been done before. “We hope to create a site survey and archaeological map, which will help us create an archeological plan, and that would let us treat the Titanic the way you would the Pyramids or any of the wonders of the world,” he says.


Jennifer Van Grove

A team of archaeologists, scientists and oceanographers will soon be revisiting the wreck of the Titanic for further scientific discovery and documentation. The entire process will be shared in near real-time with the world via social media.

The mission, Expedition Titanic, is meant to not only preserve the iconic ship — disintegrating two and half miles beneath the sea — but also to expose the wreck site to the public for the first time.

It’s a scientific undertaking like no other, but one with a very modern twist that relies heavily on social media to share the mission with the world.

The video below briefly introduces the mission behind the expedition.


The Mission: Virtually Raise the Titanic


The digital journey is the result of a partnership between RMS Titanic, Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Premier Exhibitions, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Waitt Institute. The expert dive doesn’t officially kick off until August 22, but the site is live and should help build anticipation for the upcoming deep sea trek.

The Expedition Titanic launched late last night, and those curious about the research initiative can already use the interactive flash-based site to virtually dive down to the ocean floor and explore the ship’s remains for themselves.

At its core, Expedition Titanic is designed to give those at home a lens through which to see what the experts are seeing. After taking the 3D-animated journey down to the wreck site, visitors can explore the wreck site map, check out video and images that will be shared from the dive in near real time, and control a close-up 360 degree view of the equipment used for mapping the Titanic’s final resting place. There’s also informational tidbits scattered throughout the site, messages from team members and eventually a 3D model of the ship.

Chris Greco, vice president of digital at Premier Exhibitions, explains that Expedition Titanic aims to “capture the entire wreck site,” something that has never been done before. “We hope to create a site survey and archaeological map, which will help us create an archeological plan, and that would let us treat the Titanic the way you would the Pyramids or any of the wonders of the world,” he says. Leer más “Explore the Titanic Wreck Site via Social Media [EXCLUSIVE]”

Project will ‘virtually raise’ the Titanic with 3D map

A team is to make the most detailed survey ever of the Titanic, producing a 3D map of the ship.

RMS Titanic – the grandly-titled Salvor-In-Possession of the Titanic, has teamed up with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Waitt Institute for the mission.

Robot cameras will film sonar and video images of the ship and the debris field surrounding it, starting next month. When the imaging is complete, a 3D ‘map will be created and shown off by RMS Titanic’s parent company, Premier Exhibitions.

“The significance and scope of this mission, the team we’ve assembled to carry it out, and the breakthrough technologies being deployed will give people the opportunity to experience Titanic like never before,” says Chris Davino, Premier Exhibition’s CEO and president of RMS Titanic.


Emma Woollacott

A team is to make the most detailed survey ever of the Titanic, producing a 3D map of the ship.

RMS Titanic – the grandly-titled Salvor-In-Possession of the Titanic, has teamed up with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Waitt Institute for the mission.

Robot cameras will film sonar and video images of the ship and the debris field surrounding it, starting next month. When the imaging is complete, a 3D ‘map will be created and shown off by RMS Titanic’s parent company, Premier Exhibitions.

“The significance and scope of this mission, the team we’ve assembled to carry it out, and the breakthrough technologies being deployed will give people the opportunity to experience Titanic like never before,” says Chris Davino, Premier Exhibition’s CEO and president of RMS Titanic. Leer más “Project will ‘virtually raise’ the Titanic with 3D map”