The Thinking Mindset vs. The Doing Mindset: Pick One (And Only One)


by Art Markman | http://99u.com

Ilustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco
You’ll find that some days, the ideas come fast and furious. The days when you just want to sit at your desk, stare up at the sky and just let your mind wander.Other days, though, you really want to get moving. You’re antsy and you can’t really focus on any one thought. Instead, you are most efficient if you are getting things done.

It is no coincidence that the motivation to think and the motivation to act seem to strike us at different times. Research by psychologists Arie Kruglanski, Tory Higgins, and their colleagues suggests that we have two complementary motivational systems: the “thinking” system and the “doing” system – and we’re generally only capable of using one at a time.Think about how you best generate new ideas. Often, you “brainstorm” or try to come up with as many ideas as possible. That is called diverging and requires our thinking system. At other times, you need to evaluate those ideas and figure out which ones are best. That is called converging, and it requires the activation of the doing system.

We have a ‘thinking’ system and a ‘doing’ system – and we’re generally only capable of using one at a time. 

Managing your mindset can help you optimize your thinking when you are trying to be creative. Here are a few suggestions for influencing your motivational state. These suggestions can be effective either for you as an individual or when you are working in a group.Get some distance.

Physical and mental distance influence the way you think about things. When you are near to something, you think about it specifically, and you focus on the ways that you can interact with it. Being close to your work engages the doing system. When you are far from it, you think about it more conceptually. Distance engages the thinking system.

Your workplace environment is strongly associated with getting things done. In order to engage a thinking mindset, spend time working in another place. Change your environment, and you will change the way you think.

Stand up and move.

The modern workplace revolves around sitting. Most people have a primary workspace that involves a chair in front of a desk or table. This posture is great, because it allows us to work for long periods of time without causing bodily fatigue.

Change your environment, and you will change the way you think.

Additionally, the seated posture does not support many complex actions, so it reinforces the activation of a thinking mindset, especially thanks to years of schooling.

If you need to jumpstart your doing motivation, get moving. Stand up. Walk around your workspace. Put your ideas on sheets of paper and physically separate them in your space. Walk over to each idea and evaluate it separately. By getting up and moving, you shift yourself from a mode of deliberation to one of selection. Leer más “The Thinking Mindset vs. The Doing Mindset: Pick One (And Only One)”

(+) relevante ‘ outstanding | game-changer.net | Jorge Barba…


Powerfule Strategic Thinking technique for non-strategic thinkers


how to get better at strategic thinking

How can you get better at strategic thinking? Or in other words, “How do you improve your thought process?” One of the keys to becoming a great leader is to constantly improve your strategic thinking, so you can adjust to new global realities.

The first step is to accept that you are not right most of the time. You have to “constantly” question your own opinions. One way to do this is to surround yourself with people who don’t think like you. People who will question you. Make these people a key part of your team because what you don’t want is to be surrounded by YES men.

Another tip is learn game theory. Game theory is the study of strategic decision making. And strategic thinking is all about making better decisions. Game theory provides you tools to help you gain added perspective to generate alternative views. If you have added perspective, you’ll be able to anticipate and think critically about what may lay ahead; which are key strategic thinking habits.

Anyway, here a few simple and cost-effective ways to begin developing your strategic thinking ability: Continue reading 

Mind Mapping


 

Educabilia - Comunidad de Aprendizaje

Fascinado con el concepto de Mind Mapping (“mapas mentales”), Leer más “Mind Mapping”

How do you encourage employees to share ideas? | via game-changer.net



This is the second of a series of weekly posts where I will answer a few common questions about innovation. Please feel free to add your own response. Also, if you have any questions you think we should discuss, let me know.

Good ideas can come from anywhere, but just asking for them doesn’t mean everyone will speak their minds. I think this is where a gap exists between activating innovation and simply talking about it. It’s also why it is important for leaders to be open and share their thought process with others to encourage dialogue.

Beyond the Here are a few more ways: Leer más “How do you encourage employees to share ideas? | via game-changer.net”

How to Find a Career Field You’re Truly Passionate About | via workawesome.com


 

Work Awesome

It’s no secret that people who are truly passionate about their line of work tend to achieve more long term success than those who simply go where they believe their talents lie. They are more motivated to muscle through obstacles and take the risks they need to in order to move to the next level.

I’ve always believed that passion and success — whether in the form of monetary wealth or personal fulfillment — go hand in hand. But what do you do when you simply aren’t in touch with your passions? Or when you aren’t sure how your passions can translate into a viable career choice?

I spent the majority of my college years working towards a degree in early childhood education, sorting through textbooks about child psychology and taking classes about the best methods for teaching various subjects. I thought that I had found my calling.

Then, I started my first internship shadowing a second and third grade teacher. There were aspects of the job I loved — making connections with the kids, helping out with art projects, lending a hand when a student was struggling with a specific concept — but when it came down to it, my passion wasn’t there.

I saw the teachers that were truly passionate about the job come in long before the students did and leave long after the janitors had finished cleaning, and I couldn’t imagine having that kind of dedication. And that wasn’t fair to the students or myself.

So in a moment of clarity, I switched my major to English Writing — a subject I had always been drawn to and had always had a knack for.

Since then, I know I’ve been in the general vicinity of my passion, only taking jobs I believe I can enjoy and trying to keep myself present in everything that I do. But I don’t think I’ve fully arrived at a place where I wake up everyday excited to see what’s next.

I recently had a conversation in which I confidently spouted off all of the jobs I was qualified for and the tasks I could manage for someone. The response was “Yes, but what do you want to do?”

Ironically, I hadn’t thought about that.

Until I answer that key question, I can’t fully live my passion. With that in mind, here are the things I’m implementing into my life in order to find, and eventually live, my passion.

Take note of your hobbies first, your skill set second.

Making all decisions based on my education or skill set automatically pigeon holes me into open positions that other people have created, not necessarily what I’m passionate about.

However, I know that my hobbies are where my true passion lies because that’s how I choose to spend my free time — time that I have the freedom to spend in a variety of ways. So if I seek to find ways to implement my skills into these areas I’ll be closer to finding a career field or job that really speaks to me. Leer más “How to Find a Career Field You’re Truly Passionate About | via workawesome.com”

Wasting Time on Productivity


brasstackthinking.com

Wasting Time On Productivity - Brass Tack ThinkingFor the most part, we all really think we’re busy, and that our work is important.Ask anyone you know how they are, and their likely response: “Busy!” I’ve been guilty myself.We talk about slaying the inbox dragon and achieving “inbox zero” (which is a terrible objective, incidentally, but that’s a different discussion). We scramble for the latest productivity apps, shortcuts, or new-shiny methods, lamenting how over-communicated and over-connected we are all the time and hungry for something, anything to help us feel less overwhelmed. We tweet about it and Facebook about it, sharing our busy with everyone so they know we’redoing a lot of stuff.To an extent our overwhelm is a product of our environment, but mostly it’s a monster of our own making. Too often, what we’re really doing is focusing on our “busyness” because we feel desperately powerless over the actual things we need to achieve or get done, or we’ve no idea where to start and we think that being more “efficient” is the answer. Leer más “Wasting Time on Productivity”

Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present by Stephan De Villiers


http://switchandshift.com

If you’ve not read Stephan’s writings then welcome. For 21st century leaders, the over dependence on managers to make decisions is a bottleneck to progress. Though it may keep change resistant managers happy, it leaves many dissatisfied. Stephan offers up some insights to move away from the staleness inherent in inflated importance. This is part one of two.

If Your People are not Thinking, You are Failing as a Leader

Meet Gary.  He is the leader of a small organization and a very “hands on” guy.  He makes a point of knowing about every single detail in the organization and gets involved in the detail 90% of the time.  He further prides himself in his problem solving abilities. He is the “go to guy” and likes the fact that people look up to him when they have a problem. He gets involved in all the decision making processes in the organization.  In his mind he plays a vital role in solving problems and making important decisions.  Gary is convinced he is a very effective leader and his contribution plays an important role in the success of the organization.

Making People Dependant

The sad truth is Gary is not a very effective leader.  The way he leads people creates a culture of dependence on him as leader in the organization.  This results in people not thinking anymore, becoming lazy to solving problems and losing confidence to make decisions on their own.  Through his behaviour Gary stifles the creative genius of the people he leads.  By not affording them the opportunity to think and come up with solutions to problems and challenges, he has made them dependant.

Gary is not only doing the organization a disservice, but himself as well.  By focussing so much on solving other people’s problems, he neglects development areas in his personal leadership, such as coaching and setting direction.  He spends most of his time involved in problem solving mode, stealing time he could have spent more productively.

Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present

Successful leadership means your followers don’t need you around for them to be productive.  They can operate without you.  Once you set the direction, they move on their own accord towards the goal.  This means as leader you can spend your time on motivating, coaching and course correcting.  A successful leader allows people to make their own decisions.  It means they must be able to face problems and come up with solutions, without involving the leader in the process of getting to the solution. To achieve this, people in the organization must think for themselves.

People need to be trained to think. It may sound strange, because doesn’t thinking come rather naturally? The truth is very few people actually learn to think in terms of problem solving. Thinking skills like lateral thinking, thinking out of the box and analytical thinking, unfortunately does not come without training.

As a leader it is your job to help people to develop these skills. At first it will take a lot of effort and will not be easy, especially if your organization has a culture of dependency. It will also take effort from your side, because you will have to trust people to come up with solutions and make the right decisions. You will have to deal with wrong decisions and mistakes as part of the growing pains.

Being available as coach to guide and give advice will become your primary function during this transition. The good news is there is a process you can follow to make it easier to train people in their thinking processes.

The Think Training Process… Leer más “Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present by Stephan De Villiers”