Is Content King? Thomson Reuters Editor And Taboola CEO Say — “Maybe”


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Imagine you knew you could write the best article of your life, but no one would ever read it. Would you bother?I asked Dan Colarusso, Global Head of Programming of Thomson Reuters, this question over breakfast in New York’s West Village a week ago. If there’s anyone who understands content, it’s Dan – given his background in infusing content with passion for a host of companies including Bloomberg, New York Post, and Condé Nast’s Portfolio.com, the place where his content vision first came together.

Like most meetings that involve an editor sitting down with someone who lives and dies by RPM and PageViews, we took turns constructively challenging one another: Content or Distribution? Quality or Quantity? Desktop or Mobile? Demo-targeting or intent-based content marketing? Leer más “Is Content King? Thomson Reuters Editor And Taboola CEO Say — “Maybe””

Microsoft remoza MSN para la era Windows 8


Cuando a fin de mes Microsoft presente el windows 8 anunciará también el rediseño total de su portal en Internet MSN. El nuevo diseño está pensado para seducir a usuarios de tabletas.

MSN Logo



La empresa de software más grande del mundo está realizando una “gran y multimillonaria inversión en dólares” para crear una “operación mediática de buen tamaño”, dijo Bob Visse, gerente general de MSN Product Management Group.

Microsoft vendió su participación de 50% en la página de Internet de noticias MSNBC.com en julio a su socio hace mucho tiempo NBCUniversal, que ahora es en su mayor parte propiedad de Comcast Corp.
MSN es uno de los portales más grandes de Internet junto a Yahoo y AOLLa redacción de MSNBC en el campus de Microsoft en Redmond (Washington) está siendo desmontada, mientras MSN construye un nuevo equipo en sus oficinas cercanas a Bellevue. Leer más “Microsoft remoza MSN para la era Windows 8”

David Schlesinger las reglas del periodismo en un cambio constante

Habla David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de la legendaria agencia de noticias Reuters;

Cambiando el periodismo, cambiando a Reuters.
David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de Reuters News

Estas son las reglas del periodismo hoy

1. Conocer la historia que cuentas no es suficiente.

2. Contar la noticia es sólo el principio.

3. La conversación sobre la historia es tan importante como la noticia misma.


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Habla David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de la legendaria agencia de noticias Reuters

Cambiando el periodismo, cambiando a Reuters.
David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de Reuters News

Estas son las reglas del periodismo hoy

1. Conocer la historia que cuentas no es suficiente.

2. Contar la noticia es sólo el principio.

3. La conversación sobre la historia es tan importante como la noticia misma. Leer más “David Schlesinger las reglas del periodismo en un cambio constante”

Now Skype Wants to Go Corporate

Skype, which disrupted the telecommunications industry with free or low-cost calls routed over the Internet, is once again an independent company. EBay (EBAY) bought the Estonian startup in 2005, but, after a strained relationship, sold most of its stake for $2 billion in November. Now the new owners, led by private equity firm Silver Lake, are imposing business rigor on the company and pushing it to grab a piece of the corporate telecommunications market.

Skype is in talks to sell its software through Cisco Systems (CSCO) and ShoreTel (SHOR), both of which make phone systems, according to a person familiar with the discussions. Skype is also doubling the size of its sales and support team to better reach business customers and respond when technical issues arise.

Skype is already a verb for the more than 520 million consumers around the world who use it for phone calls or video chats. According to a report by investment bank Thomas Weisel Partners, Skype had $705 million in revenue last year, a 28 percent jump from 2008. The corporate market, which research firm IDC values at $203 billion, presents a more lucrative opportunity.

Persuading corporations to ditch their traditional carriers won’t be easy. “There are some major roadblocks to growing this in the large enterprise space,” says Jayanth Angl, an analyst at Info-Tech Research Group in London, Ont. Chief among them: giving IT managers more control. In industries such as health care and finance, companies need to track and monitor calls—something Skype doesn’t allow for. Skype also needs to convince potential customers that its service, which is sometimes criticized for poor quality, is reliable and secure enough for important business calls.


Cisco Systems Logo
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The chat service is tapping Cisco and ShoreTel to help it sell telecom to big business

By Joseph Galante

Skype, which disrupted the telecommunications industry with free or low-cost calls routed over the Internet, is once again an independent company. EBay (EBAY) bought the Estonian startup in 2005, but, after a strained relationship, sold most of its stake for $2 billion in November. Now the new owners, led by private equity firm Silver Lake, are imposing business rigor on the company and pushing it to grab a piece of the corporate telecommunications market.

Skype is in talks to sell its software through Cisco Systems (CSCO) and ShoreTel (SHOR), both of which make phone systems, according to a person familiar with the discussions. Skype is also doubling the size of its sales and support team to better reach business customers and respond when technical issues arise.

Skype is already a verb for the more than 520 million consumers around the world who use it for phone calls or video chats. According to a report by investment bank Thomas Weisel Partners, Skype had $705 million in revenue last year, a 28 percent jump from 2008. The corporate market, which research firm IDC values at $203 billion, presents a more lucrative opportunity.

Persuading corporations to ditch their traditional carriers won’t be easy. “There are some major roadblocks to growing this in the large enterprise space,” says Jayanth Angl, an analyst at Info-Tech Research Group in London, Ont. Chief among them: giving IT managers more control. In industries such as health care and finance, companies need to track and monitor calls—something Skype doesn’t allow for. Skype also needs to convince potential customers that its service, which is sometimes criticized for poor quality, is reliable and secure enough for important business calls. Leer más “Now Skype Wants to Go Corporate”

Tabula Rasa: Onward to the Conceptual Age

At Tabula Rasa NYC we asked a stunning group of innovators, developers and visionaries to consider five questions at a pivotal moment for media and the people who create it:
How does moment of opportunity look?
What has been created in just a few weeks?
What should be created?
What are the challenges?
What problems can we solve?

We saw awe-inspiring work, a renewal of the creative passion that helped launch the Internet and its period of technical, entrepreneurial and societal achievement. Old-school publishers such as Popular Science, Zagat and Thomson Reuters rediscovered their game with sharp-shooting apps aimed at connected audiences. NPR and ESPN enhanced experiences that were already compelling online. There were untethered virtuosos, too, such as Electric Literature, the Ghost in the Machine (under development) collaboration, and soloist Rob Kelley’s BeatPad. We’ll revisit and follow the development of their apps in subsequent posts, examining the qualities that make them successful.



At Tabula Rasa NYC we asked a stunning group of innovators, developers and visionaries to consider five questions at a pivotal moment for media and the people who create it:
How does moment of opportunity look?
What has been created in just a few weeks?
What should be created?
What are the challenges?
What problems can we solve? Leer más “Tabula Rasa: Onward to the Conceptual Age”