Should bloggers have control over ads that appear next to their content?

Given the collective bargaining power needed to amass ad dollars, many popular independent bloggers have handed over their sidebars and headers to large blog networks, trusting them to seek out advertisers in return for a percentage of revenue. The larger networks can sometimes contain hundreds of bloggers and sell access to their blogs as packaged deals, meaning a single ad will be displayed across dozens of blogs within a network.

In most cases, this is ideal for the blogger because he can focus on creating content without having to waste time chasing down advertisers.

But occasionally this can lead to an ad placement with which the blogger doesn’t agree, and this is when controversy erupts.

Take, for instance, the Scienceblogs network, which faced a revolt from over a dozen of its own bloggers a few weeks ago when it decided to launch a corporate blog sponsored by Pepsi.

The blog — since taken down — resembled all the other blogs on the network and was aggregated alongside them in its main news feed. Perhaps most outrageously, the corporate-penned posts were being indexed in Google News, which has a high bar of entry for what news sources it allows.


Via TheNextWeb.com: Should bloggers have control over ads that appear next to their content?
Excerpt, then a comment:.

Given the collective bargaining power needed to amass ad dollars, many popular independent bloggers have handed over their sidebars and headers to large blog networks, trusting them to seek out advertisers in return for a percentage of revenue. The larger networks can sometimes contain hundreds of bloggers and sell access to their blogs as packaged deals, meaning a single ad will be displayed across dozens of blogs within a network.

In most cases, this is ideal for the blogger because he can focus on creating content without having to waste time chasing down advertisers.

But occasionally this can lead to an ad placement with which the blogger doesn’t agree, and this is when controversy erupts.

Take, for instance, the Scienceblogs network, which faced a revolt from over a dozen of its own bloggers a few weeks ago when it decided to launch a corporate blog sponsored by Pepsi.

The blog — since taken down — resembled all the other blogs on the network and was aggregated alongside them in its main news feed. Perhaps most outrageously, the corporate-penned posts were being indexed in Google News, which has a high bar of entry for what news sources it allows. Leer más “Should bloggers have control over ads that appear next to their content?”

In Shock Move, Google Starts Advertising On Facebook

I’d have to think that this is a bit of a PR blunder from Google and I’m also surprised that the ads were approved by Facebook but I guess the only way of looking at it is that Facebook reckons Google’s money is any good as anybody’s. I guess the logic from Google’s point of view is that they want to target a whole new audience and like the fact that they can target these ads by region and demographic which is why Facebook is as attractive a proposition as it is. If you can’t beat em join em!


by Niall Harbison | //thenextweb.com

We all know about the impending social war that is brewing up between Facebook and Google but today it has taken an interesting turn with Google starting to pay Facebook for advertising space on their platform to advertise their browser Google Chrome.

It’s clear that Google are on a massive push to acquire users for it’s browser in it’s battle with Firefox, Safari and IE and although I have seen adverts for Chrome in all sorts of innovative places the last place in the world I expected to see them was on Facebook. I wonder how Microsoft (an investor in Facebook with a strategic partnership) feels about these ads given they would be one of the main competitors in the browser wars.

Leer más “In Shock Move, Google Starts Advertising On Facebook”

When Twitter becomes real life. Where’s the line?

I saw something happening on Twitter a few days ago, and ever since then I’ve been thinking more and more about the role it plays in our lives and at what point it actually stops becoming something that we ‘do’ and actually starts to replace real life altogether. I don’t want to name the person involved in the incident, but they were very publicly tweeting about something upsetting, as it was happening. As much as I was upset by what they were going through, when I stopped and thought about it, I realised how disturbed I was by the fact that this person had chosen to tweet about this thing, as it happened, instead of giving it the real attention it needed. It was as if Twitter had replaced the real-life situation and it was incredibly strange to watch it happening.

Twitter has always been a different animal. Never quite hitting the mainstream in the way that Facebook has, yet always finding itself in the headlines (or responsible for them). It has hugely affected online communication in ways that we never could have imagined in its early days. But it has had such an odd effect on so many people (myself included). I’m sure I’m not the only one that will think, when something particularly exciting happens or you spot a celeb etc.. that you can’t wait to put it out on Twitter. You think this, even as you’re going through something and you almost forget to enjoy it or notice it as you’re composing your tweet in your head. I find it fascinating that for so many people it’s fundamentally changed every human experience.


//thenextweb.com
By Lauren Fisher

I saw something happening on Twitter a few days ago, and ever since then I’ve been thinking more and more about the role it plays in our lives and at what point it actually stops becoming something that we ‘do’ and actually starts to replace real life altogether. I don’t want to name the person involved in the incident, but they were very publicly tweeting about something upsetting, as it was happening. As much as I was upset by what they were going through, when I stopped and thought about it, I realised how disturbed I was by the fact that this person had chosen to tweet about this thing, as it happened, instead of giving it the real attention it needed. It was as if Twitter had replaced the real-life situation and it was incredibly strange to watch it happening.

Twitter has always been a different animal. Never quite hitting the mainstream in the way that Facebook has, yet always finding itself in the headlines (or responsible for them). It has hugely affected online communication in ways that we never could have imagined in its early days. But it has had such an odd effect on so many people (myself included). I’m sure I’m not the only one that will think, when something particularly exciting happens or you spot a celeb etc.. that you can’t wait to put it out on Twitter. You think this, even as you’re going through something and you almost forget to enjoy it or notice it as you’re composing your tweet in your head. I find it fascinating that for so many people it’s fundamentally changed every human experience.

Your other Twitter life

I think this has contributed to many people almost creating a ‘Twitter self’ that needs to be maintained. I’m often surprised for example, when I see couples talking with each other on Twitter when I know they’re in the same room. But I’ve realised now that it’s not so much about using Twitter as a way of talking to someone next to you, but more contributing to the content around your online self, and talking to your online community. Your Twitter self is something that has to be maintained and so in this way, it almost starts to take over from your real self. For all the benefits of Twitter and all the ways it can enhance your life, there comes a point when it almost replaces your life. And it’s easy to forget this, because it’s just somehow not the same as sitting in front of a chat window. In that case it’s always there and it’s pretty much all you’re doing. But Twitter can run in the background while you watch telly, you can dip in every now and again and work and it doesn’t seem like all you’re doing is reading updates that actually have nothing to do with your work. Leer más “When Twitter becomes real life. Where’s the line?”

The allure of SocialNet’s features will catch, and please, anyone with an iPhone.

TNW Quick Hit

SocialNet allows one to manage Facebook and Twitter on the iPhone, while also aggregating a multitude of other internet information in one easy-to-use app.

Love It: Nice user interface. Ability to post to Twitter and Facebook simultaneously in addition to adding live feeds for a great deal of other web content is a deft move by the developer.

Hate It: Not for the Twitter or Facebook power user.

The Details:

If you follow applications of any sort, mobile, browser-based or other, and let’s face it, who doesn’t?, several things would become real clear, real quick. The first being that at least a few new Facebook or Twitter apps for the iPhone/iPod touch are released every day. The second is that the same goes for apps that aggregate RSS and/or news feeds.

SocialNet ($.99) is an app that falls into both of the categories listed above, but also manages to add so much more in an easy-to-use, nicely designed, app.



TNW Quick Hit

SocialNet allows one to manage Facebook and Twitter on the iPhone, while also aggregating a multitude of other internet information in one easy-to-use app.

Love It: Nice user interface.  Ability to post to Twitter and Facebook simultaneously in addition to adding live feeds for a great deal of other web content is a deft move by the developer.

Hate It: Not for the Twitter or Facebook power user.

The Details:

If you follow applications of any sort, mobile, browser-based or other, and let’s face it, who doesn’t?, several things would become real clear, real quick.  The first being that at least a few new Facebook or Twitter apps for the iPhone/iPod touch are released every day.  The second is that the same goes for apps that aggregate RSS and/or news feeds.

SocialNet ($.99) is an app that falls into both of the categories listed above, but also manages to add so much more in an easy-to-use, nicely designed, app. Leer más “The allure of SocialNet’s features will catch, and please, anyone with an iPhone.”

Have a great idea? A chance to put your best “face” forward and “ping” a billionaire.

Mark Cuban. Brilliant, entrepreneurial, and in need of something.

For those unfamiliar with Mark Cuban, here’s a brief, emphasizing brief, overview of the last 10+ years of his life. Cuban, who along with Todd Wagner, started Audionet, combining their mutual interest in college basketball and webcasting. This venture grew into what would eventually become Broadcast.com, acquired by Yahoo! in 1999 for $5.9 billion in Yahoo! stock. Currently, Cuban is the owner of the Dallas Mavericks, of Landmark Theatres, and Chairman of HDNet.

Brief.

Now Mark Cuban wants to talk to you, and unfortunately, not me.

In a post on his blog, Blog Maverick, which I highly recommend following, he writes the following:

“If you develop Social Games I want to talk to you. Im looking to invest in games, developers and projects

Im looking for consumer and corporate applications. I’m not looking for knockoffs of existing games/apps. I’m also looking for physical products that have integrated social gaming components . My preference for all the above is that they run on or integrate deeply with Facebook and/or Itunes 10/Ping and all the devices they support.”

You can post them here or email me at blogmaverick@aol.com.

If I like it , I will respond. If I dont, I wont. I wont sign and NDA.”


Mark Cuban.  Brilliant, entrepreneurial, and in need of something.

For those unfamiliar with Mark Cuban, here’s a brief, emphasizing brief, overview of the last 10+ years of his life.  Cuban, who along with Todd Wagner, started Audionet, combining their mutual interest in college basketball and webcasting.  This venture grew into what would eventually become Broadcast.com, acquired by Yahoo! in 1999 for $5.9 billion in Yahoo! stock. Currently, Cuban is the owner of the Dallas Mavericks, of Landmark Theatres, and Chairman of HDNet.

Brief.

Now Mark Cuban wants to talk to you, and unfortunately, not me.

In a post on his blog, Blog Maverick, which I highly recommend following, he writes the following:

“If you develop Social Games I want to talk to you. Im looking to invest in  games,  developers and projects

Im looking for consumer and corporate applications. I’m not looking for knockoffs of existing games/apps. I’m also looking for physical products that have integrated social gaming components . My preference for all the above is that they run on or  integrate deeply  with Facebook and/or Itunes 10/Ping and all the devices they support.”

You can post them here or email me at blogmaverick@aol.com.

If I like it , I will respond. If I dont, I wont.  I wont sign and NDA.” Leer más “Have a great idea? A chance to put your best “face” forward and “ping” a billionaire.”

The Value of a Social Media Fan….Priceless

As social media continues to win respect and legitimacy in the hearts and minds of executives across the world and more companies than ever are looking to open up a Facebook page to take their brand “social” -a question that is repeatedly asked by brands is: What is the value of a fan? (or a “liker” in today’s terms).

This question is often asked by two very opposing camps. For those against social media, there is an inherent derogatory tone and a cynical smirk they like to use when they ask this question, however when discussing old media outlets, they never raise this question.

Allow me to explain: When a prospective client wants an indication of the value of a commercial time slot on a given network, the network will generally provide him with viewership stats, meaning, on average, how many viewers of a prized demographic can the client expect to reach during their 30 seconds of air time. These statistics are gathered and measured against market demand, and translated into a monetary figure. Major Television events, like the U.S. Super Bowl, can reap more than 1 million dollars for a few seconds of airtime.

When you take that criteria and transfer it to Facebook, it’s quickly recognized that demographics and numbers are already a feature which the client gets automatically as soon as he begins his social media path . The demographics are super targeted as members have to opt-in to become “likers” and the numbers are plainly visible for all to see. Yet for some reason, because these “viewers” (to borrow a term from television) are not viewing the commercial (post) during an actual television program, their value is presumed by social media naysayers to be less significant. If anything, the interactive nature of Facebook fans should make them more valuable, not less so. For old advertising to assume that stats and demographics are not enough information to warrant a value estimate for social media, is a clear double standard and downright hypocrisy.


As social media continues to win respect and legitimacy in the hearts and minds of executives across the world and more companies than ever are looking to open up a Facebook page to take their brand “social” -a question that is repeatedly asked by brands is: What is the value of a fan? (or a “liker” in today’s terms).

This question is often asked by two very opposing camps. For those against social media, there is an inherent derogatory tone and a cynical smirk they like to use when they ask this question,  however when discussing old media outlets, they never raise this question.

Allow me to explain: When a prospective client wants an indication of the value of a commercial time slot on a given network, the network will generally provide him with viewership stats, meaning, on average, how many viewers of a prized demographic can the client expect to reach during their 30 seconds of air time. These statistics are gathered and measured against market demand, and translated into a monetary figure. Major Television events, like the U.S. Super Bowl, can reap more than 1 million dollars for a few seconds of airtime.

When you take that criteria and transfer it to Facebook, it’s quickly recognized that demographics and numbers are already a feature which the client gets automatically as soon as he begins his social media path . The demographics are super targeted as members have to opt-in to become “likers” and the numbers are plainly visible for all to see. Yet for some reason, because these “viewers” (to borrow a term from television) are not viewing the commercial (post) during an actual television program, their value is presumed by social media naysayers to be less significant. If anything, the interactive nature of Facebook fans should make them more valuable, not less so. For old advertising to assume that stats and demographics are not enough information to warrant a value estimate for social media, is a clear double standard and downright hypocrisy. Leer más “The Value of a Social Media Fan….Priceless”