e-Newsletters: Great content, strong ties

This is the other difference between an audience on Twitter and an audience of e-newsletter subscribers. The Twitter audience will include a huge variety of people, most of whom will never buy from you, some of whom might, and a few who probably will.

With an e-newsletter you can target your audience more narrowly, encourage signups from true prospects, and leave the tire kickers to follow you on Twitter or like you on Facebook.

Within the scope of the marketing plans for many companies, there are solid arguments for working with both social media and e-newsletters.

This article isn’t intended to bash social media. Far from it.


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by Nick Usborne | http://www.webcontentcafe.com/2010/10/e-newsletters-great-content-strong-ties/

Social media is great for making the most of many-to-many engagements.

But e-newsletters are better when it comes to one-to-many engagements.

I’m not arguing against social media. But we have to understand the nature of the ties we create through sites like Twitter and Facebook. For the most part, those ties are very weak. And the greater the number of followers or friends you have, the weaker most of those individual ties will be.

And weak ties put a limit on what you can expect from social media. Offer people a coupon, and people will react. Give them a cool link, and they’ll click on it. But if you ask them to upgrade to your nifty service upgrade for just $299, the numbers of people who act will plummet.

Enter the e-newsletter.

With an e-newsletter, your ties to your readers can be much stronger. You get more quality time, and quality attention, because it is one-to-many, not many-to-many. Deliver quality, and they’ll stay with you, reading your content, without being distracted by the chatter of the “many”.

If your content is good enough, you’ll have decent open rates, and you’ll build deeper, stronger ties with each issue delivered.

Of course, that conversion rate will also depend on how carefully you have tailored your e-newsletter content to match the information needs of your true prospects. While e-newsletters have the potential to create strong ties, and deliver high conversion rates, this happens only when you are clear about your audience and their needs.

This is the other difference between an audience on Twitter and an audience of e-newsletter subscribers. The Twitter audience will include a huge variety of people, most of whom will never buy from you, some of whom might, and a few who probably will.

With an e-newsletter you can target your audience more narrowly, encourage signups from true prospects, and leave the tire kickers to follow you on Twitter or like you on Facebook.

Within the scope of the marketing plans for many companies, there are solid arguments for working with both social media and e-newsletters.

This article isn’t intended to bash social media. Far from it.

But it is a reminder that e-newsletters are just as powerful as they have ever been, and shouldn’t be abandoned just because they are not the latest and greatest tool in the toolbox.

http://www.webcontentcafe.com/2010/10/e-newsletters-great-content-strong-ties/

Choose your audience, and then stir them up.

There are warring factions within pretty much every audience.

Well, maybe not warring. But you are almost certain to find groups or tribes within an audience taking different and sometimes diametrically opposing views.

Here are a few examples.

In the world of search engine optimization, you have the white-hat optimizers and the black-hat optimizers.

In the world of buying gold coins, you have the “gold bugs”, who believe in a dizzying array of conspiracy theories, and are certain the price of gold should be higher. And you have the data-hounds who believe gold prices are where they should be, and can be predicted by studying countless charts.

In the world of coffee lovers, you have those who tell you that percolators make the richest, best-tasting coffee. And you have another group who swear that percolators make the worst possible coffee.

In the world of copywriting, some will say that hard-selling copy works best, and some will say it doesn’t.

Whatever your topic or business, you’ll have your own equivalent of white-hat SEO enthusiasts, or gold bugs.

And the editorial slant of your website probably already leans towards one faction or another.

But how do you engage your audience? Do you always feed them the information and opinions they already agree with? Or do you mix things up a bit, and stimulate some debate?

Preaching to the converted.

Many websites do well by choosing a single faction of readers, and then engaging them by reaffirming their point of view

Simply deliver the messages your readers want to hear, and many will become ardent fans.

If you are writing to people who think home schooling is better than public schooling, give them a site where they feel supported and validated.

If you are writing to people who believe that soft-sell copywriting works better than hard-sell copywriting, become their cheerleader.


There are warring factions within pretty much every audience.

Well, maybe not warring. But you are almost certain to find groups or tribes within an audience taking different and sometimes diametrically opposing views.

Here are a few examples.

In the world of search engine optimization, you have the white-hat optimizers and the black-hat optimizers.

In the world of buying gold coins, you have the “gold bugs”, who believe in a dizzying array of conspiracy theories, and are certain the price of gold should be higher. And you have the data-hounds who believe gold prices are where they should be, and can be predicted by studying countless charts.

In the world of coffee lovers, you have those who tell you that percolators make the richest, best-tasting coffee. And you have another group who swear that percolators make the worst possible coffee.

In the world of copywriting, some will say that hard-selling copy works best, and some will say it doesn’t.

Whatever your topic or business, you’ll have your own equivalent of white-hat SEO enthusiasts, or gold bugs.

And the editorial slant of your website probably already leans towards one faction or another.

But how do you engage your audience? Do you always feed them the information and opinions they already agree with? Or do you mix things up a bit, and stimulate some debate?

Preaching to the converted.

Many websites do well by choosing a single faction of readers, and then engaging them by reaffirming their point of view

Simply deliver the messages your readers want to hear, and many will become ardent fans.

If you are writing to people who think home schooling is better than public schooling, give them a site where they feel supported and validated.

If you are writing to people who believe that soft-sell copywriting works better than hard-sell copywriting, become their cheerleader. Leer más “Choose your audience, and then stir them up.”

Content that pulls. And content that pushes.

There are several factors that drive us to create new content for our websites.

Maybe we have a list of pages to be written that will be optimized for long-tail keywords.

Or we have a list of topics we need to address to complete various subject areas on our site.

Or we have some reader questions to answer.

Or we have some pages to put up with a view to getting good distribution through social media.

But as we immerse ourselves in writing these pages, we can lose sight of the fact that a web page needs a purpose beyond just being there as a source of information.

To put it simply, a web page needs to be either pulling or pushing.

Pulling new readers into the site for the first time, and pulling returning visitors back again and again.

Or pushing readers to take an action – whether to subscribe, to buy, to sign up, to download, to take a free trial, or click on a revenue-earning link.

So once you have created that list of upcoming content, whether it be about keywords, customer questions, missing subject matter…or whatever…mark it as either a page that is written to pull, or to push.

What’s the difference? How do you write pages that pull or push?


by Nick Usborn (¹)

There are several factors that drive us to create new content for our websites.

Maybe we have a list of pages to be written that will be optimized for long-tail keywords.

Or we have a list of topics we need to address to complete various subject areas on our site.

Or we have some reader questions to answer.

Or we have some pages to put up with a view to getting good distribution through social media.

But as we immerse ourselves in writing these pages, we can lose sight of the fact that a web page needs a purpose beyond just being there as a source of information.

To put it simply, a web page needs to be either pulling or pushing.

Pulling new readers into the site for the first time, and pulling returning visitors back again and again.

Or pushing readers to take an action – whether to subscribe, to buy, to sign up, to download, to take a free trial, or click on a revenue-earning link.

So once you have created that list of upcoming content, whether it be about keywords, customer questions, missing subject matter…or whatever…mark it as either a page that is written to pull, or to push.

What’s the difference? How do you write pages that pull or push? Leer más “Content that pulls. And content that pushes.”