4 Landing Page Testing Tips To Remember -vía @ioninteractive


by Anna Talerico

Testing landing pages can be a lot of fun. Especially when you are able to quickly see results, analyze your data and launch new test waves quickly and easily. It’s addicting to launch an experience and see how it’s performing in real-time.

ion interactive - Optimizing Marketing Performance Beyond Landing Pages

But it’s easy to get so wrapped up in the real-time nature of testing that you forget to stop, slow down and be methodical. We’ve blogged about this recently with our 12-point landing page testing process and awesome format for documenting test plans.

Sometimes even in the when you know the right process to follow, you need a little cold water on your face before you make a wrong turn. Here are 4 quick  tips to remember next time you are in the heady, giddy phase of a landing page test. Just a little dose of testing reality:

1. Don’t call the test too soon.

2. Don’t despair.

3. Be ready to be wrong, be ready to be right.

4. Learn.

  • Trust your landing page testing tool, sit back and let it calculate statistical confidence for you. You want to be sure of the results, and results can change before statistical confidence is reached.
  • Many marketers who are just getting started launch a test with no result, throw up their arms, declare testing doesn’t work and stop testing. Don’t be that marketer. Stick with it, and you will get results.
  • Be the marketer who avoids getting dogmatic about what will and won’t work, and instead be the one who says, “I don’t know, let’s test it”.
  • While launching some big new feature or redesign on your site is all risk (you won’t know how it works until you launch it!), taking a simple layout/content/design test live is pure experimentation—little risk, and lots of opportunity for reward

The Newbie’s Guide to Test-Driven Development

Nikko Bautista

Testing your code is annoying, but the impact of not doing so can be orders of magnitude more annoying! In this article, we’ll use test-driven development to write and test our code more effectively.

What is Test-Driven Development?

Since the dawn of the computer era, programmers and bugs have battled for supremacy. It’s an inevitable occurrence. Even the greatest programmers fall prey to these anomalies. No code is safe. That’s why we do testing. Programmers, at least sane ones, test their code by running it on development machines to make sure it does what it’s supposed to.

Test-driven development is a programming technique that requires you to write actual code and automated test code simultaneously. This ensures that you test your code—and enables you to retest your code quickly and easily, since it’s automated.

How does it work?

Test-driven development, or TDD as we’ll call it from now on, revolves around a short iterative development cycle that goes something like this:

1. Before writing any code, you must first write an automated test for your code. While writing the automated tests, you must take into account all possible inputs, errors, and outputs. This way, your mind is not clouded by any code that’s already been written.
2. The first time you run your automated test, the test should fail—indicating that the code is not yet ready.
3. Afterward, you can begin programming. Since there’s already an automated test, as long as the code fails it, it means that it’s still not ready. The code can be fixed until it passes all assertions.
4. Once the code passes the test, you can then begin cleaning it up, via refactoring. As long as the code still passes the test, it means that it still works. You no longer have to worry about changes that introduce new bugs.
5. Start the whole thing over again with some other method or program.


The Newbie’s Guide to Test-Driven Development

Testing your code is annoying, but the impact of not doing so can be orders of magnitude more annoying! In this article, we’ll use test-driven development to write and test our code more effectively.


What is Test-Driven Development?

Since the dawn of the computer era, programmers and bugs have battled for supremacy. It’s an inevitable occurrence. Even the greatest programmers fall prey to these anomalies. No code is safe. That’s why we do testing. Programmers, at least sane ones, test their code by running it on development machines to make sure it does what it’s supposed to.

Test-driven development is a programming technique that requires you to write actual code and automated test code simultaneously. This ensures that you test your code—and enables you to retest your code quickly and easily, since it’s automated.

How does it work?

Test-driven development, or TDD as we’ll call it from now on, revolves around a short iterative development cycle that goes something like this:

  1. Before writing any code, you must first write an automated test for your code. While writing the automated tests, you must take into account all possible inputs, errors, and outputs. This way, your mind is not clouded by any code that’s already been written.
  2. The first time you run your automated test, the test should fail—indicating that the code is not yet ready.
  3. Afterward, you can begin programming. Since there’s already an automated test, as long as the code fails it, it means that it’s still not ready. The code can be fixed until it passes all assertions.
  4. Once the code passes the test, you can then begin cleaning it up, via refactoring. As long as the code still passes the test, it means that it still works. You no longer have to worry about changes that introduce new bugs.
  5. Start the whole thing over again with some other method or program. Leer más “The Newbie’s Guide to Test-Driven Development”