Lead Gen Form Optimization: Why a lower conversion rate can be a good thing


 

Daniel Burstein
marketingexperiments.com

Friction on your lead generation landing pages is bad, because it reduces conversions.

Except that is not always a bad thing. Hear me out for a moment …

As we teach in the MarketingExperiments Landing Page Optimization Online Course, you’re certainly not looking to eliminate friction. When it comes to lead generation, you’re not even always looking to reduce friction … what you’re looking for is the right balance that ultimately makes your company more profitable.

This might seem counterintuitive at first, especially if you work in a marketing department that has a relentless focus on only one number – the amount of lead generated.

However, high-quality leads will likely result in less dead ends for the sales force. Thus, Sales will invest more of its time on leads more apt to close, which should make everyone happier at the end of the day.

 

Use the lead gen dials to flexibly optimize your page

But you don’t have to be locked into only one approach. The great thing about the lead gen dial approach (shown in the image above) is that it can help you flexibly adapt to your company’s needs:

  • If your sales force is simply starved for leads, you can reduce friction to increase the number of leads they receive.
  • If your sales force has a long list of leads they still haven’t contacted, you can dial up friction to reduce the overall number of leads, but acquire higher-quality leads that go straight to Sales with a clear priority attached in them.

Of course, if you work in the marketing department, these changes shouldn’t happen in a vacuum. You should create a flexible universal lead definition with Sales that can adapt and scale as the company’s needs change.

 

Friction in lead generation forms

One of the most impactful places to adjust friction is in the lead gen form itself. Here are three places you can adjust friction, and then test to see which combination is most profitable for your company:

  • Make some form fields optional. If you use this technique, very motivated leads can choose to give more information, but you hypothetically wouldn’t lose any less motivated leads, since they wouldn’t have to fill out those form fields.

A word of caution, though — a long form presents a large amount of perceived friction. Let’s face it, even with optional fields, a long form just looks time-consuming in the split second a prospect decides whether to act or not.

  • Use a two-step process. You can capture basic information, and then ask for more in-depth information in a second step. You can test offering an incentive for completion of the more time-consuming second step, or just clearly communicate the benefit to the prospect (for example, that they will receive more relevant information from your company).

For leads that don’t complete the second step, you can follow up and try to gain more information at a later date (when they might be further along in the buying cycle, and, therefore, more motivated to provide that information).

  • Simply remove form fields. Take a good hard look at your form and sit down with every person or department that has an interest in that form. For example, does Job Title or Budget really help Sales? If so, it might be worth keeping.

If not, it may be like the appendix, a vestigial form field that had a good purpose in a previous era, but no one currently at the company remembers why exactly they needed that information. Leer más “Lead Gen Form Optimization: Why a lower conversion rate can be a good thing”

Lead Generation Optimization: Finding the right amount of friction

Three keys to keep in mind when testing your lead generation process:

Choose the right time to add more friction. Think of your lead generation process as a personal introduction to someone. The moment you meet someone you don’t ask for a lot of personal information. If you do, you scare people away. The same concept applies here. For example, in a recent experiment, we tested moving the phone number field from the first step to the second step. Lead generation rate increased by 68% and the conversion rate remained stable.
Prioritize your requests properly. Think carefully about what information you ask first, second, and so on. It is important to keep a natural flow as you add and subtract friction elements. A good way to check for this with your pages and processes is to review every step and consider two questions: 1) Do we need this information? 2) Do we need it at this stage?
Pay close attention to your final conversion rate. We tested a three-step process against a four-step process. As expected, the three-step process had a higher lead generation rate. However, once the sales team got the leads and started following up on them, they found that leads from the four-step process were more qualified and easier to close. Bottom line: the four-step process had a lower lead generation rate, but ultimately a higher final conversion rate (sales).


Gaby Diaz

 | marketingexperiments.com

If you’ve got a B2B website, you’re always looking for ways to generate more leads online. But while recent research shows 71% of B2B marketers view their site as one of the most important marketing tools, only 31% said their site is “highly effective” at generating leads.

That leaves a lot of room for testing and improving business results. However, optimizing for lead generation is not as straightforward as optimizing for conversion rate.

Conversion rate is the final metric that decides whether or not your online process/funnel is working. In contrast, lead generation only tells you a portion of the story. The leads you generate are really the start of a long process of qualification steps, both online and offline. If you don’t pay attention to each step, you will never be able to get the best out of this process.


How to use friction to your advantageAdjusting Your Leads

Think of the process of optimizing for lead generation as two interconnected dials. Each dial represents a step in your online process. One dial increases volume of leads by reducing friction. The second dial increases quality of the lead by increasing friction.

You can increase friction in several ways, such as adding more form fields or steps in the funnel process. Or, you can reduce it by subtracting various page elements or process steps. To adjust your lead flow, turn the dials: more friction will yield higher lead quality; less friction will increase lead volume.

Too much friction can make your visitors quit, but not enough friction will fill your pipeline with leads of a lower quality. So you need to test different approaches to determine what balance works best for your lead generation process. Leer más “Lead Generation Optimization: Finding the right amount of friction”

New Data: Want More Leads? Offer Downloadable Content


Posted by Dan Zarrella |http://blog.hubspot.com/

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This post is a sneak peak at the exclusive new data from the upcoming Science of Lead Generation webinar on October 12th. Register now to reserve your spot. Remember, it’s more important how much business your site generates, than what it looks like.

One of the most important elements of lead generation is creating compelling offers to entice people to give you their contact information.

To understand what offers users perceive to be the most valuable, I conducted a survey asking people to rank a handful of offer types.

offers

The results show that people prefer content-based offers rather than “demo” type offers which imply a more sales-oriented process. If you want leads, try offering a downloadable kit, or a free trial of your product.

Read more: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/6710/New-Data-Want-More-Leads-Offer-Downloadable-Content.aspx?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+HubSpot+%28HubSpot%29#ixzz11R4wRpo6

Inbound Marketing: lo mejor es que te encuentren

El inbound marketing ya no es un concepto nuevo, aunque quizás sí poco conocido en nuestro mercado. El término fue acuñado por la compañía Hubspot, especializada en marketing en internet, y se ha convertido en un término genérico en los mercados de habla inglesa que podríamos traducir como marketing de entradas.

Existe el inbound marketing desde que existen usuarios en la red. Sin embargo, el mundo 2.0 ha propiciado, sin duda, esta tendencia que nos permite estar dónde nuestros clientes potenciales buscan información, soluciones, etc., y en consecuencia dar con nosotros.

Lejos de interrumpir a nuestro target a través de las tradicionales herramientas outbound, como la recepción de una llamada desde un centro de telemarketing cuando estás apunto de entrar en el cine, el inbound es aquel marketing que consigue ser encontrado por los usuarios, permitiéndoles que lleguen a nosotros, a nuestro producto, en definitiva, hasta nuestra web cuando ellos lo desean.


El inbound marketing ya no es un concepto nuevo, aunque quizás sí poco conocido en nuestro mercado. El término fue acuñado por la compañía Hubspot, especializada en marketing en internet, y se ha convertido en un término genérico en los mercados de habla inglesa que podríamos traducir como marketing de entradas.

Existe el inbound marketing desde que existen usuarios en la red. Sin embargo, el mundo 2.0 ha propiciado, sin duda, esta tendencia que nos permite estar dónde nuestros clientes potenciales buscan información, soluciones, etc., y en consecuencia dar con nosotros.

Lejos de interrumpir a nuestro target a través de las tradicionales herramientas outbound, como la recepción de una llamada desde un centro de telemarketing cuando estás apunto de entrar en el cine, el inbound es aquel marketing que consigue ser encontrado por los usuarios, permitiéndoles que lleguen a nosotros, a nuestro producto, en definitiva, hasta nuestra web cuando ellos lo desean. Leer más “Inbound Marketing: lo mejor es que te encuentren”