New Translation Software Lets You Speak 26 Different Languages

“The word is just one part of what a person is saying,” he says, and to truly convey all the information in a person’s speech, translation systems will need to be able to preserve voices and much more. “Preserving voice, preserving intonation, those things matter, and this project clearly knows that,” says Narayanan. “Our systems need to capture the expression a person is trying to convey, who they are, and how they’re saying it.”

Siri who? Sorry, eager iOS and Android users, right now only the people who have access to this software are the people at Microsoft Research Asia.

Anuncios

School children sharing answers.

Forget Rosetta Stone — researchers at Microsoft have developed a program that uses speech recognition software to translate what someone is saying into another language using a modified version of the person’s own voice.

According to MIT’s Technology Review, the software can translate any combination of 26 different languages. Researcher Frank Soong demonstrated it at Micrsoft’s campus in Redmond, Washington by translating the voice of his boss into Spanish, Mandarin Chinese and Italian.
One of the more impressive aspects of the software is how it uses the speaker’s original voice in its translations, which it can pick up after the user spends just an hour with it. Shrikanth Narayanan, a professor at the University of Southern California, explains why that is important:To anyone who’s ever watched Star Trek, the appeal of a “universal translator” is obvious. Soong says it could help travelers communicate while traveling abroad, translate directions for GPS apps to make driving in foreign countries easier and help students who are learning new languages. Leer más “New Translation Software Lets You Speak 26 Different Languages”

Un test de aliento para detectar el cáncer supera su primer ensayo clínico

Muy pronto, una test de aliento podrá hacer mucho más que decir si has estado bebiendo. Metabolomx, una start-up de Mountain View, California (EE.UU.) acaba de terminar un ensayo clínico que demuestra que su prueba de aliento puede detectar el cáncer de pulmón con una fiabilidad del 83 por ciento y además puede distinguir entre distintos tipos de la enfermedad, algo que normalmente requiere llevar a cabo una biopsia. La fiabilidad del análisis es equiparable a la que se consigue usando imágenes de los pulmones obtenidas mediante tomografías computerizadas de baja dosis.

Las pruebas que existen para detectar el cáncer de pulmón -la principal causa de muerte a escala mundial- producen demasiados falsos positivos, lo que implica que los pacientes se tienen que enfrentar a biopsias innecesarias o exponerse a la radiación de la tomografía. Eso por no mencionar que ninguno de estos procedimientos entran dentro de lo cubierto por Medicare, el sistema de seguridad social de Estados Unidos para las personas con menos recursos. Un análisis de aliento promete la posibilidad de llevar a cabo un diagnóstico mucho más sencillo y seguro.


http://www.technologyreview.es

Alentador: Dentro del aparato de Metabolomx el aliento se hace pasar por 120 reactivos químicos que cambian de color en respuesta a biomarcadores volátiles.
Fuente: Technology Review

BIOMEDICINA

Una ‘start-up’ afirma que su prueba es capaz de distinguir entre distintos subtipos de cáncer de pulmón.

Muy pronto, una test de aliento podrá hacer mucho más que decir si has estado bebiendo. Metabolomx, una start-up de Mountain View, California (EE.UU.) acaba de terminar un ensayo clínico que demuestra que su prueba de aliento puede detectar el cáncer de pulmón con una fiabilidad del 83 por ciento y además puede distinguir entre distintos tipos de la enfermedad, algo que normalmente requiere llevar a cabo una biopsia. La fiabilidad del análisis es equiparable a la que se consigue usando imágenes de los pulmones obtenidas mediante tomografías computerizadas de baja dosis.

Las pruebas que existen para detectar el cáncer de pulmón -la principal causa de muerte a escala mundial- producen demasiados falsos positivos, lo que implica que los pacientes se tienen que enfrentar a biopsias innecesarias o exponerse a la radiación de la tomografía. Eso por no mencionar que ninguno de estos procedimientos entran dentro de lo cubierto por Medicare, el sistema de seguridad social de Estados Unidos para las personas con menos recursos. Un análisis de aliento promete la posibilidad de llevar a cabo un diagnóstico mucho más sencillo y seguro. Leer más “Un test de aliento para detectar el cáncer supera su primer ensayo clínico”

Social Search’s Algorithm


Image representing Clickz as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase
Mark  Jackson

In May 2009, I wrote a column about the talk at the time that Twitter could be a “Google killer.” Fast forward a few months (OK, almost a year) and now we have Google partnered with Twitter.

At the time of my initial writing, I mentioned that until Twitter cleaned up the potential for spam, I didn’t see that Twitter could possibly be a Google killer. I spoke about the fact that Google rose in popularity, years ago, because it had figured out how to deliver higher quality search results (certainly not entirely “spam free,” but much better than we had seen before).

On January 13, 2010, Technology Review interviewed Amit Singhal, a Google Fellow, who led development of real-time search. In this article, Amit shares how Google ranks tweets. Leer más “Social Search’s Algorithm”