Help! My Competitors Are Following Me On Twitter, What Do I Do? // Nice @theideabrand :)


This morning I received an email from one of our Brand Partners asking how she should deal with direct competitors that are following her company on Twitter.

“Do we block direct competitors from following us or is this just what happens in social media?”

My answer: You can block competitors on Twitter but that doesn’t really make a difference.

theideabrand.com

When you block an unwanted follower, the user no longer has the ability to:

  • Follow you
  • See your profile picture on their page or in their timeline
  • Have their @replies mentions show in your mentions tab
  • Add your Twitter account to one of their lists

Why Blocking Competitors on Twitter Doesn’t Matter

Blocking a competitor doesn’t stop them from gathering competitive intelligence through other means such as following your account under a different alias.

In addition, your competitor can still monitor your Twitter profile without actually following your account by leveraging social media monitoring platforms such as Radian6 and Sysomos.  They can gather information about which Twitter influencers engage with you the most, analyze which topics are trending with your consumers, and track down your disgruntled customers to swoop in for a chance to be a hero.

Full article !

Does Anybody Listen To Your Tweets Or Retweets?

This interesting survey landed in our inbox a couple of days ago from sysomosos where they have analyzed 1.2 billion tweets to see if any particular patterns emerge around @ replies and Retweets. This Twitter survery is interesting because it shows that nearly 3 quarters of tweets go pretty much unanswered and I personally didn’t think that number would be so high. Given the large amount of inane conversation on Twitter it is also not surprising to see that a tiny 6% of tweets get retweeted. Some really nice data here and really well presented as well…
retweets replies v2 Does Anybody Listen To Your Tweets Or Retweets?
Most Retweets Happen in the First Hour

They discovered that 92.4% of all retweets happen within the first hour of the original tweet being published, while an additional 1.63% of retweets happen in the second hour, and 0.94% take place in the third hour. This means that if a tweet is not retweeted in the first hour, it is very likely that it will not be retweeted. The graph below shows the fraction of tweets from the second hour onwards – the x-axis shows the time in hours since the original tweet, while the vertical axis shows the fraction of retweets within a particular hour. The 92.4% of all retweets, which happen within the first hour, are not displayed in the chart. 1.63% of retweets happen in the second hour, and 0.94% take place in the third hour.


This interesting survey landed in our inbox a couple of days ago from sysomosos where they have analyzed 1.2 billion tweets to see if any particular patterns emerge around @ replies and Retweets. This Twitter survery is interesting because it shows that nearly 3 quarters of tweets go pretty much unanswered and I personally didn’t think that number would be so high. Given the large amount of inane conversation on Twitter it is also not surprising to see that a tiny 6% of tweets get retweeted. Some really nice data here and really well presented as well…
retweets replies v2 Does Anybody Listen To Your Tweets Or Retweets?

Most Retweets Happen in the First Hour

They discovered that 92.4% of all retweets happen within the first hour of the original tweet being published, while an additional 1.63% of retweets happen in the second hour, and 0.94% take place in the third hour. This means that if a tweet is not retweeted in the first hour, it is very likely that it will not be retweeted. The graph below shows the fraction of tweets from the second hour onwards – the x-axis shows the time in hours since the original tweet, while the vertical axis shows the fraction of retweets within a particular hour. The 92.4% of all retweets, which happen within the first hour, are not displayed in the chart. 1.63% of retweets happen in the second hour, and 0.94% take place in the third hour.

Leer más “Does Anybody Listen To Your Tweets Or Retweets?”

On Twitter, Almost Everyone Is Five Friends Apart


Have you heard Six Degrees of Separation? In case you have not, it refers to the idea that everyone is at most six steps away from any other person on Earth, so that a chain of, “a friend of a friend” statements can be made to connect any two people in six steps or less. However, on Twitter there are just five degrees of separation between you and almost everybody else on the social media platform. Leer más “On Twitter, Almost Everyone Is Five Friends Apart”