A Kiwi guide to surviving and thriving at SXSW

This year I was lucky enough to be part of a panel at SXSW– a massive music, interactive and film festival held each year in Austin, Texas. And when I say massive, I mean massive. It’s like the madness of the RWC opening ceremony – but for nine solid days. Official attendance numbers for SXSW 2012 haven’t yet been released, but there was talk of between 30,000 and 50,000 people in total. In that throng were a handful of Kiwis, but we need more to add to the contingent!

If you are into any or all of the three streams, then I would definitely recommend heading along next year and joining in the madness. This is not just any conference. Be prepared for a huge amount of networking, partying, ideas and celebrity spotting. Business is done at food trucks, new apps are launched, rumours run wild and some of the smartest people in the industry share their ideas.

If you are a SXSW virgin, here are some tips to help make the craziness a bit less crazy.

1. Book your accommodation early. Places to lay your weary head are in short supply during SXSW. I heard rumours of hotel room rates rocketing as high as $2,000 per night – and that is USD we are talking! I was fortunate enough to be on a SXSW panel which meant I had access to SXSW booked accommodation. I was right across the road from the Austin Convention Centre (the hub of SXSW) which was fantastic. If you can’t get into the central city, then there are plenty of options in the ‘burbs and SXSW runs a shuttle service to collect and drop off attendees every day. One of my friends was staying in the Auckland equivalent of Hamilton (literally in the next city) and transport options were reduced to taxis (which were expensive). The flip side of that is one guy I met who turned up on Sunday and walked into the Hilton next to the Convention Centre and was given a room without any booking at all! Other options include renting an apartment or checking out Airbnb and Craiglist for rooms to rent.


http://socialmedianz.com

SXSW is now one of the global digital technology brainstorming and networking events of the year. Simone McCallum captures the excitement and also the hassles!

This year I was lucky enough to be part of a panel at SXSW– a massive music, interactive and film festival held each year in Austin, Texas. And when I say massive, I mean massive. It’s like the madness of the RWC opening ceremony – but for nine solid days. Official attendance numbers for SXSW 2012 haven’t yet been released, but there was talk of between 30,000 and 50,000 people in total. In that throng were a handful of Kiwis, but we need more to add to the contingent!

If you are into any or all of the three streams, then I would definitely recommend heading along next year and joining in the madness. This is not just any conference. Be prepared for a huge amount of networking, partying, ideas and celebrity spotting. Business is done at food trucks, new apps are launched, rumours run wild and some of the smartest people in the industry share their ideas.

If you are a SXSW virgin, here are some tips to help make the craziness a bit less crazy.

1. Book your accommodation early. Places to lay your weary head are in short supply during SXSW. I heard rumours of hotel room rates rocketing as high as $2,000 per night – and that is USD we are talking! I was fortunate enough to be on a SXSW panel which meant I had access to SXSW booked accommodation. I was right across the road from the Austin Convention Centre (the hub of SXSW) which was fantastic. If you can’t get into the central city, then there are plenty of options in the ‘burbs and SXSW runs a shuttle service to collect and drop off attendees every day. One of my friends was staying in the Auckland equivalent of Hamilton (literally in the next city) and transport options were reduced to taxis (which were expensive). The flip side of that is one guy I met who turned up on Sunday and walked into the Hilton next to the Convention Centre and was given a room without any booking at all! Other options include renting an apartment or checking out Airbnb and Craiglist for rooms to rent.

Leer más “A Kiwi guide to surviving and thriving at SXSW”

De indigente a “punto” Wi-Fi: la publicidad lo hace todo posible

Esta semana se está celebrando laSXSW, la conferencia anual de tecnología que acaba de empezar en Austin. Con motivo del gran evento, 13 personas sin techo deambulan alrededor del centro de conferencias con camisetas blancas que dicen “yo soy _____, un punto de acceso 4G”. Cada uno lleva un dispositivo de conexión inalámbrica a internet y, por una donación de PayPal, proporcionará a los asistentes acceso a internet durante el tiempo que necesiten, según informaBuzzfeed.com.

Los diez hombres son parte de una campaña de publicidad que recibe el nombre de “Homeless Hotspots”, elaborada por la empresa de marketing BBH. Las críticas a la iniciativa no se han hecho esperar pero desde BBH, defienden su campaña y niegan que vean a las personas sin hogar como mero hardware…


marketingdirecto.com

Esta semana se está celebrando laSXSW, la conferencia anual de tecnología que acaba de empezar en Austin. Con motivo del gran evento, 13 personas sin techo deambulan alrededor del centro de conferencias con camisetas blancas que dicen “yo soy _____, un punto de acceso 4G”. Cada uno lleva un dispositivo de conexión inalámbrica a internet y, por una donación de PayPal, proporcionará a los asistentes acceso a internet durante el tiempo que necesiten, según informaBuzzfeed.com.

Los diez hombres son parte de una campaña de publicidad que recibe el nombre de “Homeless Hotspots”, elaborada por la empresa de marketing BBH. Las críticas a la iniciativa no se han hecho esperar pero desde BBH, defienden su campaña y niegan que vean a las personas sin hogar como mero hardwareLeer más “De indigente a “punto” Wi-Fi: la publicidad lo hace todo posible”

How To Harness Influence

Time100landingimage “Influence is not something done by certain people to other people. It’s the result of those people we call The Influenced doing something in response to those we call Influential.” [Mark Earls]

Influence is not something that is done to people. Public relations professionals work on identifying the people they’d like to reach and crafting messages that appeal to them in order to get the word out and sway publics.

To understand why your PR pitches may strike out, we’ll take a look at the three main components and six drivers of influence through a PR lens.


Time100landingimage “Influence is not something done by certain people to other people. It’s the result of those people we call The Influenced doing something in response to those we call Influential.” [Mark Earls]

Influence is not something that is done to people. Public relations professionals work on identifying the people they’d like to reach and crafting messages that appeal to them in order to get the word out and sway publics. Leer más “How To Harness Influence”

ReadWriteWeb / Latest news…


Ask.com Co-Founder Joins Allvoices

Written by Curt Hopkins

allvoices.pngDavid Warthen, co-founder of search engine Ask.com (formerly Ask Jeeves) has joined citizen journalism site Allvoices as its Chief Technology Officer.

Warthen was co-founder, and CTO for, Ask Jeeves. As Ask.com it remains the fourth most consulted search engine. It was sold to Barry Diller’s InterActive Corp for $1,85 billion in 2005. After Jeeves, Warthen acted as CTO for Eye Games, “a pioneer of full-body motion interactive webcam video games that presaged the Nintendo Wii” and Answerbag, acquired by Demand Media in 2007.

Allvoices relies on a lot of technology to do what it does. In addition to the relatively simple parts, like allowing contributors to sign up and readers to read stories, the company uses a Digg-like reader ranking system to bring stories up in the mix. It uses a complex search algorithm to verify story submissions. They also use reputation ranking to decide which contributors are the most trustworthy and they have to communicate these dynamic algorithms to users in a way that makes them useful.

“Allvoices technology is in support of the human element – where global citizens are the creators and curators of the content – to make both the site and the business model scalable,” Warthen told us. “These human/algorithm hybrid systems have been at the core of most of the work I have done, where the people involved are considered part of the system and not “outside” of the system.” Leer más “ReadWriteWeb / Latest news…”

Experiences of a SXSW Noobie


Author Richie Cruz March
I like to think I maintain a perfectly healthy skepticism of the unknown.

So, last week, when told I’d be attending SXSW along with some other AgencyNetters, my immediate enthusiasm was quickly met with feelings of perplexity- I’d never been to SXSW, much less its interactive bucket, so I had no idea what to expect. A majority of my friends and industry colleagues had previously attended the music track, which I had assumed would overlap in some capacity.  Needless to say, pen, pad, and laptop handy, I hit the Austin Convention Center like it was freshman year orientation all over again.

Leaving New York was no small ordeal; my travel experience, compounded by rain and delays took an unbelievable 13 hours. Needless to say, I managed to arrive safely and in one piece, and began my three-day experience as an empty vessel, waiting to be filled with knowledge by some of the most influential minds in our industry.

Here is a quick summary of some of the best discussions that I attended:

The first (and definitely one of the best) of the discussions I sat in on was Clay Shirky’s “Monkeys with Internet Access: Sharing, Human Nature, and Digital Data.” The NYU professor brilliantly gave a discourse on “sharing”: its evolutionary origins, its considerable disruptive potential, how our shifting communication paradigm is responsible for the recent explosion in sharing behavior and the implications of such for creating civic value.

Clay ShirkyClay Shirky does his thing… without slides!

Some great points:

  • Abundance breaks more things than scarcity
  • Technology and media revolutions can devalue existing institutions because of inferiority by comparison.
  • Behavior = motivation filtered by opportunity.
  • People can use sharing to create civic value (For example, patientslikeme.com – where users upload their most personal medical symptoms allowing patients to better understand their diseases and doctor’s to better find suitable patients.) Leer más “Experiences of a SXSW Noobie”