How to create a design style guide – thnxz to @CreativeBloQ


(Abstract… full article +INFO Creative Bloq )

A style guide shouldn’t read like the work of a control freak, but nor should it be vague and ambiguous. Paul Wyatt explains how to strike the right balance.

 

Here are (some of the best) tips for ensuring your style guide does the job right in ensuring others do it right.

It doesn’t have to be perfect

Obviously we’d all love to spend time and energy crafting the perfect design style guide for each project. But in the real world, that’s not always possible. If you’re up against a tight deadline and not able to create a style guide with lots of bells and whistles (and examples), be sure to include the most pertinent and helpful information about the brand or piece of work you’re created in the time you do have.

Full article +INFO 🙂

Essential elements

Start off with:

  • a written overview of the company it’s for
  • a rationale for the work carried out
  • information about logos; font usage; colour palette; tone of voice
  • photographic guides
  • collateral information

 

If you have enough time, it’s worth adding some examples of logo and typographic usage as well as links to master artwork/ brand collateral templates and helpful contacts within your agency or company.

 

 Concentrate on the visible

Look around your workplace and you’ll (hopefully) see colleagues who look presentable and are nicely dressed. Quite possibly a large percentage of these people do not have matching pants and socks or bras and knickers. But who cares? You (hopefully) don’t get to see them. Similarly, in your style guide concentrate on the visible and the relevant. Try not to deep dive into creating colour palettes which then have sub colour palettes and then further sub, sub colour palettes which might never be used or seen.

 

Full article +INFO 🙂

 

 Work with a copywriter

Style guide tips
Big, bold words help energise and communicate brand values in an effective visual way

Work with a copywriter to energise and communicate the brand. This style guide potentially will be used client-side by the in-house creative team or sent out to other agencies to be applied in future work.

For your guide to be applied successfully it’s essential to communicate effectively in written form the brand spirit; the reason behind the work; what the guide is there for; and what the brand goals are that the creative using the guide should be mindful of.

Full article +INFO 🙂

 

Anticipate questions

At the end of the guide include relevant contacts and create a group email address should the reader have any queries about the guide and need to get in touch should there be something the guide does not explain. Although if you’ve included all the relevant details in your guide this should very rarely happen.

Also consider creating an FAQ as part of the guide and think about the top 20 questions a creative might ask about a brand when they first approach it. “I hate your logo. Do I have to use it?” is a question which isn’t allowed.

 

Create art-worked examples

Style guide tips
Art worked header examples from the BBC visual language guide

Art-working up examples of creative templates can be a great way to showcase how the guide can be interpreted. Also consider supplying these files for download with the style guide.

Tools and Resources for Grammar, Copywriting, Spelling and More

So much of the web is based around written content that it’s important for anyone who works online to have a good grasp of language, including grammar and spelling. But it’s not always easy to find reputable sources that can teach us these things if we didn’t learn them in school (or retain them for long after). Below are over thirty great resources for learning more about grammar, vocabulary, copywriting, and more. If you have more resources you’ve found helpful, please share them in the comments!

Grammar Resources

The resources included here will help you perfect your punctuation and refine your word usage. Some are very practical and down-to-earth while others inject a fair dose of humor into the learning process.

When to Use I.E. in a Sentence
This is a fantastic comic from The Oatmeal that explains exactly how and when to use i.e. in a sentence, complete with angry gorilla.


By Cameron Chapman

So much of the web is based around written content that it’s important for anyone who works online to have a good grasp of language, including grammar and spelling. But it’s not always easy to find reputable sources that can teach us these things if we didn’t learn them in school (or retain them for long after). Below are over thirty great resources for learning more about grammar, vocabulary, copywriting, and more. If you have more resources you’ve found helpful, please share them in the comments!

Grammar Resources

The resources included here will help you perfect your punctuation and refine your word usage. Some are very practical and down-to-earth while others inject a fair dose of humor into the learning process.

When to Use I.E. in a Sentence
This is a fantastic comic from The Oatmeal that explains exactly how and when to use i.e. in a sentence, complete with angry gorilla.

Whentouseie in Tools and Resources for Grammar, Copywriting, Spelling and More

How to Use a Semicolon
The semicolon is probably the single-most misused punctuation mark out there. This comic from The Oatmeal will show you how to properly use them.

Howtouseasemicolon in Tools and Resources for Grammar, Copywriting, Spelling and More

10 Words You Need to Stop Misspelling
This is another great comic from The Oatmeal that talks about 10 commons words a lot of people misspell, and how to remember the proper spellings.

10wordstostopmisspelling in Tools and Resources for Grammar, Copywriting, Spelling and More Leer más “Tools and Resources for Grammar, Copywriting, Spelling and More”

Writing for the Web: Improve Your Skills in 9 Easy Steps

They say that the pen is mightier that the sword. This is especially true when writing for the web, as we don’t usually see each other face to face. The intended tone of any article is, in itself, a writing skill – more so than in novels, as the author is trying to convey a definite message directly to a worldwide audience, without the help of facial expressions, tone of voice or body language.

Have you ever wondered why some articles are more popular and gain more comments than others? Is it due to the style of writing, or simply the interesting content?

Writing for the Web: Improve Your Skills in 9 Easy Steps

How often have you read an online article, then had to read it over in order to fully understand what the author is saying? I’m not including tutorials or online lessons or courses that don’t require too many words – it goes without saying that those articles have to be clear and concise to guide the reader.

What I am trying to touch on here is something more personal – something that appeals to a wider range of readers. An author must write not for one type of reader, but to interest the masses. Here are some tips that can hopefully help a writer to increase the popularity of their articles.


They say that the pen is mightier that the sword. This is especially true when writing for the web, as we don’t usually see each other face to face. The intended tone of any article is, in itself, a writing skill – more so than in novels, as the author is trying to convey a definite message directly to a worldwide audience, without the help of facial expressions, tone of voice or body language.

Have you ever wondered why some articles are more popular and gain more comments than others? Is it due to the style of writing, or simply the interesting content?

Writing for the Web: Improve Your Skills in 9 Easy Steps

How often have you read an online article, then had to read it over in order to fully understand what the author is saying? I’m not including tutorials or online lessons or courses that don’t require too many words – it goes without saying that those articles have to be clear and concise to guide the reader.

What I am trying to touch on here is something more personal – something that appeals to a wider range of readers. An author must write not for one type of reader, but to interest the masses. Here are some tips that can hopefully help a writer to increase the popularity of their articles. Leer más “Writing for the Web: Improve Your Skills in 9 Easy Steps”