To Boost Creativity, Study Abroad


Pacific Standard

New research confirms that spending a semester studying overseas enhances one’s ability to find innovative solutions.

Looking to hire someone who will make a creative contribution to your organization? Here’s a tip: When checking applicants’ college transcripts, don’t focus exclusively on their grades or honors.

Take note of whether they spent time studying abroad.

That’s the implication of newly published research, which provides the best evidence yet that studying overseas boosts one’s creativity. A semester spent in Spain or Senegal leads to higher creativity scores on two different tests, according to research conducted by Christine Lee, David Therriault, and Tracy Linderholm of the University of Florida, Gainesville.

“Cultural experiences from living abroad have wide-reaching benefits on students’ creativity, including the facilitation of complex cognitive processes that promote creative thinking,” the researchers write in the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology.

The link between studying abroad and enhanced creativity was first made in a 2009 paper by William Maddux and Adam Galinsky, who found students who spent time overseas were more likely to come up with innovative insights. Like many studies, however, it didn’t quite establish causality. The authors couldn’t say for certain that the experience was transformative, admitting it is possible that people choose to study outside the country are more creative to begin with. Leer más “To Boost Creativity, Study Abroad”

Do people like us better when we’re distracted?

Seems like it. It’s not that being distracted isn’t off-putting, but when distracted we’re less negative, less complex and more personal in our speech. We also encourage the other person to talk more.

From James Pennebaker’s book The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us:

…distracted pairs actually showed slightly higher style matching than the non-distracted pair. Even odder, they tended to report liking each other more. In terms of actual word use, the distracted students were less negative, less complex, and more personal than non-distracted writers.

There have been very few times in my career that I didn’t believe my own results. It just didn’t make sense to me that style matching increases when talking to a multitasker. So I took things into my own hands and called two former students and asked if they would mind participating in a language project. The deal would be that we would have an informal talk on the phone that would be recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. The talk would actually be made up of three five-minute segments, and after each segment, they would complete a brief questionnaire. Both agreed to the rules. What they didn’t know was that on one of the three segments, I would be sitting in my office madly doing arithmetic problems as fast as I could.


http://www.bakadesuyo.com/do-people-like-us-better-when-were-distracted

Seems like it. It’s not that being distracted isn’t off-putting, but when distracted we’re less negative, less complex and more personal in our speech. We also encourage the other person to talk more.

From James Pennebaker’s book The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us:

distracted pairs actually showed slightly higher style matching than the non-distracted pair. Even odder, they tended to report liking each other more. In terms of actual word use, the distracted students were less negative, less complex, and more personal than non-distracted writers.

There have been very few times in my career that I didn’t believe my own results. It just didn’t make sense to me that style matching increases when talking to a multitasker. So I took things into my own hands and called two former students and asked if they would mind participating in a language project. The deal would be that we would have an informal talk on the phone that would be recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. The talk would actually be made up of three five-minute segments, and after each segment, they would complete a brief questionnaire. Both agreed to the rules. What they didn’t know was that on one of the three segments, I would be sitting in my office madly doing arithmetic problems as fast as I could. Leer más “Do people like us better when we’re distracted?”

Are You Barely Passing With Your Business Philosophy?

Here’s the thing: There were no right answers.

Philosophy isn’t something you get right or wrong. There’s no right answer – the textbooks are just there to make you think and learn how to question, explore and investigate life, situations, ethics, and morals so that you can come up with fairly rational arguments about what you believe is the right answer.

The right answers are yours and yours alone.

But I didn’t know that. I was doing what I thought was expected of me – following “the rules”. I thought that if I followed them perfectly, I’d get high marks. I’d succeed.


Written by James
http://menwithpens.ca/business-philosophy/

I hated philosophy class in university. Absolutely couldn’t stand it. I read the textbooks and documents several times, listened to the audio files over and over again and wrote papers that should have pinned down the right answer perfectly.

And each time the grades for my papers came back, my face fell. They always hovered somewhere between 60 and 70%. Never higher.

So I worked harder. Read more. Listened longer. Wrote better. And still the grades came back in the dreaded range.

I didn’t understand it. It was frustrating. I was pulling high marks in other courses, so why not this one? I was working hard, but it didn’t seem to be enough.

And how much more work would it take to nail this class? Why wasn’t I acing this one? What did my professors want? Why couldn’t I find the right answers to get 90s instead of 60s? Leer más “Are You Barely Passing With Your Business Philosophy?”

Beliefs and Attitudes about Mathematics

What beliefs and attitudes about mathematics do you see in your students, in society, in the media, and elsewhere? Try and think of both positive and negative beliefs and attitudes. These can be beliefs that you agree or disagree with. I’ll start with a few, but please add your own in the comments.

* If you’re good at math, math problems can be solved in a relatively short amount of time.
* People do not solve math problems for fun; they do it for school, for their job, or to balance their checkbook.
* Every math problem has been solved by someone.
* Math is about numbers.
* Math is a language to describe the world.
* If you are good at math, you are smart.
* If you can do computations accurately and quickly, you are good at math.


Love math 1

Without Geometry, Life is Pointless
//mathteacherorstudent.blogspot.com

What beliefs and attitudes about mathematics do you see in your students, in society, in the media, and elsewhere? Try and think of both positive and negative beliefs and attitudes. These can be beliefs that you agree or disagree with. I’ll start with a few, but please add your own in the comments.

  • If you’re good at math, math problems can be solved in a relatively short amount of time.
  • People do not solve math problems for fun; they do it for school, for their job, or to balance their checkbook.
  • Every math problem has been solved by someone.
  • Math is about numbers.
  • Math is a language to describe the world.
  • If you are good at math, you are smart.
  • If you can do computations accurately and quickly, you are good at math. Leer más “Beliefs and Attitudes about Mathematics”

Making Millions on Crowdsourced Homework


How skipping high school helped Student of Fortune founder Sean McCleese find success in the tutoring business

By David Port

The irony isn’t lost on Sean McCleese, a high-school dropout at 14 who now, at the ripe old age of 26, finds himself heading a thriving online tutoring business that specializes in helping students along the very academic path he spurned as a teenager.

“True, I didn’t take the traditional, practically government-mandated academic path,” says McCleese, president and co-founder of the Glendale, Calif.-based online tutorial company Student of Fortune. “But I think the path I took, while it was untrodden and rife with large pitfalls that sometimes weren’t evident ahead of time, navigating through it has helped me as a person and as a business owner.” Leer más “Making Millions on Crowdsourced Homework”

Students Addicted To Social Media Like Drugs

A new study by University of Maryland shows that students are addicted to social media and even likening the issue with drug and alcohol addictions. And if they do not receive their daily dosage of social media, students will start to show withdrawal symptoms such as cravings, anxiousness, extremely antsy, miserable, jitteriness and craziness.


A new study by University of Maryland shows that students are addicted to social media and even likening the issue with drug and alcohol addictions. And if they do not receive their daily dosage of social media, students will start to show withdrawal symptoms such as cravings, anxiousness, extremely antsy, miserable, jitteriness and craziness.

It was found that most college students are not just unwilling, but also unable to function without access to their media links to the world. This was a result of abstinence from their laptops, iPhones, Blackberry devices and related Internet connecting paraphernalia for 24 hours.

After the experiment, the 200 students involved in it were asked to blog on private class websites about their experiences; at the same time reporting their successes and failures. As a result, the 200 students wrote more than 110,000 words; about the same as a 400-page novel.

40.9% of the students who responded to the survey reported that they were first-year students, 40.9% reported that they were sophomores, 11% reported that they were juniors, and 7.1% reported that they were seniors or beyond. Most students reported their ages as between 18-21; the average class age was 19.5.

“The students did complain about how boring it was go anywhere and do anything without being plugged into music on their MP3 players,” said Moeller. “And many commented that it was almost impossible to avoid the TVs on in the background at all times in their friends’ rooms. But what they spoke about in the strongest terms was how their lack of access to text messaging, phone calling, instant messaging, email and Facebook, meant that they couldn’t connect with friends who lived close by, much less those far away.”

Susan D. Moeller, an associate journalism professor at the University of Maryland and the director of the International Center for Media and the Public Agenda, said researchers were surprised by the students’ feedbacks when they blogged about their experience after the period of abstinence from social media.

“Texting and IM-ing my friends gives me a constant feeling of comfort,” wrote one student. “When I did not have those two luxuries, I felt quite alone and secluded from my life. Although I go to a school with thousands of students, the fact that I was not able to communicate with anyone via technology was almost unbearable.”

From what we see here, the students’ lives are wired together in such ways that opting out of that communication pattern would be tantamount to renouncing a social life. Do you think that you can spend a day without connecting to any media platforms successfully? I know I can’t; and I’m a student too. Do share with us this mini-experiment with us!

The Net Generation Are Huge Fans Of Blogs

The millennials are young adults described as the first group to have come of age in a highly Internet-connected world. Also known as the Net Generation, their year of birth falls around 1985 to 1992, they are expected to be able to use the computer to access the Web and other technologies to communicate and learn.

A recent report done by BlogHer and iVillage, co-sponsored by Ketchum and Nielsen, shows that they millennials are the most likely group to take advantage of those abilities through blogging.

Through the research, it was found that millennials represents nearly half; about 40.4% of the Internet user bases, when it comes to writing blogs. On the other hand, the combination of Generation X and Y (26-42 years old) and Boomers (43-61 years old) only makes up 46.8% of the pie while Seniors (62-76 years old) making up the rest of the 12.8%. It was found that respondents between the age of 18 to 24 blogs about twice the rate of an average person.

However, the millennials are not that big on reading blogs though. The share of readership amongst Millennials only makes up about 30.3% while Generation X and Y coming close at 29.3%.

readership and authorship milennials

On top of that report, bloggers of all ages too were polled for the reason behind their blogs. An overwhelming 81.6% stated that it was for self-expression and 80.6% stated that it was for fun. One-half of bloggers wanted to give advice, and fewer than one-third hoped to earn money with their efforts.

why do you blog

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15 Graphic Design Interview Tips


interview
The following graphic design interview tips were written by Lee Newham, a senior designer at London-based design consultancy, P&W.
I read these tips on a forum thread about interviews, and thought they’d interest you.

15 graphic design interview tips

  1. When you arrive in the interview give us your business card. It should be well designed, memorable, simple and hopefully have a great idea. It should be unique and you should be branded.
  2. Have 8–12 pieces of work in your folio. Put the best pieces at the front and back.
  3. Have at least six questions ready to ask (if you have less, you’ll find they will be answered in the course of the interview).
  4. Take a pad and pen, take it out at the beginning of the interview. You don’t have to take notes, but it looks as if you are organized.
  5. Talk about your work before you show it, but don’t talk too much. This should be one short sentence to engage the interviewer with you. We will be looking at you as you speak. Then show us your work.
  6. Have samples and mock ups.
  7. Bring sketches. We are as interested in how you got to the final solution as the solution itself. You can show other concepts.
  8. Have a copy of your CV (resumé) at the back of the portfolio. Offer it even if we already have it.
  9. On your CV don’t tell people about exam results or part-time jobs that have nothing to do with your chosen career. It pisses us off.
  10. Don’t talk about holiday or money in a first interview.
  11. Give a firm handshake.
  12. Tell us you really want the job (believe it or not, hardly anyone does this).
  13. Ask for our business card(s).
  14. When you get back home, send an email thanking us for the interview.
  15. Make sure your branding is consistent on your business card, CV and email signature.
  16. One for luck: Remember, 80% of design students are crap. We see lots of CVs (95% of which are crap). If you can get into the top 20% you will get a job.

Posted by Michael Schepis
http://www.visualkontakt.com/

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