Ogilvy One promotes Peter Moss, Lucy McCabe to reinforce global focus

Moss is promoted from regional executive creative director to vice-president of customer experience. His new role sees him move away from directly managing the creative team to take on a planning function in working to understanding how consumers connect to define specific roles for communications and appropriate channels to achieve them. He will be responsible for mapping the connections between customers and channels, platforms and media and identifying key areas of ROI impact.

Reporting to Smith, McCabe joins Moss in driving the global focus in her new role as vice-president of consulting services as they aim to implement customer value measurement and optimise the buying process accordingly. Both Moss and McCabe will remain based in Singapore and continue working with country head Stephen Mangham as they still have a part to play in the agency’s operations there.

Prior to her promotion, McCabe was head of consulting in Singapore in working with regional planning head Mark Sinnock. She will continue working with Sinnock in her new role.

“I am delighted to have Lucy and Pete on the regional team. They are both really smart people who bring the experience and new thinking that is required to maximise the opportunity for our clients in today’s and tomorrow’s world,” said Smith, who was appointed as regional president in July.


ASIA-PACIFIC – Ogilvy One has promoted Peter Moss (pictured right) and Lucy McCabe (pictured left) to regional VP roles in working with Asia CEO Jerry Smith to implement the network’s global focus.

Ogilvy One promotes Peter Moss, Lucy McCabe to reinforce global focus

Ogilvy One’s Lucy McCabe, Peter Moss

Moss is promoted from regional executive creative director to vice-president of customer experience. His new role sees him move away from directly managing the creative team to take on a planning function in working to understanding how consumers connect to define specific roles for communications and appropriate channels to achieve them. He will be responsible for mapping the connections between customers and channels, platforms and media and identifying key areas of ROI impact.

Reporting to Smith, McCabe joins Moss in driving the global focus in her new role as vice-president of consulting services as they aim to implement customer value measurement and optimise the buying process accordingly. Both Moss and McCabe will remain based in Singapore and continue working with country head Stephen Mangham as they still have a part to play in the agency’s operations there.

Prior to her promotion, McCabe was head of consulting in Singapore in working with regional planning head Mark Sinnock. She will continue working with Sinnock in her new role.

“I am delighted to have Lucy and Pete on the regional team. They are both really smart people who bring the experience and new thinking that is required to maximise the opportunity for our clients in today’s and tomorrow’s world,” said Smith, who was appointed as regional president in July. Leer más “Ogilvy One promotes Peter Moss, Lucy McCabe to reinforce global focus”

Thought Leadership Success Factor No. 5: Fueling Service Innovation, Not Just Marketing

Thought leadership programs serve one master in most professional services and other B2B firms: Marketing. Marketing generates content (commissioning studies, writing white papers, and so on). Marketing packages and distributes that content (producing academic-looking publications, seminars and webinars, educational PR campaigns, email newsletters, etc.). Marketing then turns over the resulting client inquiries to account executives. Thought leadership is a Marketing activity.

But that robs thought leadership programs of their greater potential value – as sources of service innovation, not just marketing content. When companies use thought leadership to fuel new services or rejuvenate existing ones, they not only codify expertise on how to solve some business problem; they turn it into capability that many (not just a handful) of their professionals can use with clients. They do this by taking a powerful concept described in a white paper or research study and turn it into a rigorous methodology. They then develop effective curriculum around that methodology and put their professionals through training programs so they can master it.

When that happens, thought leadership content fuels new services or new approaches to existing services – not just creates client interest in them through marketing. We have seen a number of professional firms that created strong client interest in a concept after conducting and marketing some innovative research – only to find that just a few people in their firm could actually deliver the service implied by their compelling concept. (It’s a page from the “Let’s Throw Something Against the Wall and See What Sticks” book on marketing and service development. The idea is not to develop a robust service until a firm has numerous clients who are willing to pay for it.)


Bob Buday’s blog
//bloomgroup.com/blogs/bob-buday

Thought leadership programs serve one master in most professional services and other B2B firms: Marketing.  Marketing generates content (commissioning studies, writing white papers, and so on).  Marketing packages and distributes that content (producing academic-looking publications, seminars and webinars, educational PR campaigns, email newsletters, etc.).  Marketing then turns over the resulting client inquiries to account executives. Thought leadership is a Marketing activity.

But that robs thought leadership programs of their greater potential value – as sources of service innovation, not just marketing content.  When companies use thought leadership to fuel new services or rejuvenate existing ones, they not only codify expertise on how to solve some business problem; they turn it into capability that many (not just a handful) of their professionals  can use with clients.  They do this by taking a powerful concept described in a white paper or research study and turn it into a rigorous methodology.  They then develop effective curriculum around that methodology and put their professionals through training programs so they can master it.

When that happens, thought leadership content fuels new services or new approaches to existing services – not just creates client interest in them through marketing.  We have seen a number of professional firms that created strong client interest in a concept after conducting and marketing some innovative research – only to find that just a few people in their firm could actually deliver the service implied by their compelling concept.  (It’s a page from the “Let’s Throw Something Against the Wall and See What Sticks” book on marketing and service development.  The idea is not to develop a robust service until a firm has numerous clients who are willing to pay for it.)

When you think about what would happen to other industries that followed this practice, you begin to see that it’s insane.  Imagine a pharmaceutical company that conducted drug research for marketing purposes only, telling the market it’s come up with a breakthrough compound but deciding not to manufacture it.  That’s just about the state of thought leadership programs in most of the B2B firms we know.  What they publish is often not something that most of their professionals practice.

I’m not sure why this is the case.  But I know it is the case.  Perhaps it’s because service innovation in professional services is in its infancy.  Few firms have created formal and highly productive processes for developing superior services.  In most professional firms I know, services are hand-crafted by individual artisans – practicing consultants, lawyers or accountants who often in their spare time document some approach to solving a recurring client problem.
Leer más “Thought Leadership Success Factor No. 5: Fueling Service Innovation, Not Just Marketing”

Introducing the buyer-centric revolution

Beyond the organisation’s go-to-market goals and imperatives, marketing also makes a bigger, broader economic contribution. Every economy involves production and consumption; supply and demand. How well the economy works, however, doesn’t just depend on production prowess but on how well production and consumption/supply and demand are aligned. If you’re brilliant at supply, but you supply something for which there is no demand, then your production activities haven’t created wealth. They have created waste instead.

Ditto: if you have produced stuff people want but they can’t navigate their way to it, your efforts are as good as wasted. So the magic ingredients in any economic system are not production and consumption in isolation, but the alignment and navigation that bring them into line, in sync. Marketing’s broader economic contribution, then, is to ensure that production is a wealth creating rather than a waste creating activity. Pretty important in other words.

Now: a question. Who says it is the God-given right or duty of organisations to direct, manage and organise these economically critical tasks of alignment and navigation? The principle of alignment and navigation holds true whether it is carried out by producers (the source of supply), a third party such as a government, or the source of demand (‘the consumer’).


The Marketing Metrics Continuum provides a fra...
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Reinventing marketing

Sometimes something is so obvious you don’t need to give it a second thought. It’s obvious for example that the sun orbits the earth and it’s obvious that the marketing is something that’s done by marketers who are employed by organisations to achieve the goals the organisation sets them.

Obvious perhaps, but sometimes the obvious hides a deeper not-so-obvious truth. To glimpse this deeper truth we first need to see how our initial assumption colours everything – everything – marketers do. If ‘marketing’ is done by marketers working for organisations then:

— the purpose of marketing: to help the organisation achieve its go-to-market goals.

— the processes marketers use – processes that help the organisation pursue its purpose, of course.

— the metrics marketers use to measure how well they are doing.

For any practitioner, this is a vast, rich and complex agenda. But as I’ve noted before, it’s also stunningly limited. So let’s step outside of it for just a moment. Leer más “Introducing the buyer-centric revolution”

Finding Your First Clients


Once you become better known in your profession, clients will constantly come to you instead of you looking for them. You’ll often be so busy with work and won’t need to market yourself as often.

But, what do you do when you’re just starting out or not well known? Before you begin getting clients, it can be tough to figure out what to do all day. That’s the perfect time to make yourself well known.

Finding clients is different for everyone and what works for some doesn’t always for others. However, I’d like to share several of the ways I got work in the beginning.

http://www.amberweinberg.com/finding-your-first-clients/

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