What is a Mission Statement? | businessnewsdaily.com


Vía businessnewsdaily.com

A mission statement is a statement declaring the purpose of an organization or company — the reason for this company’s existence. A mission statement provides framework and context to help guide the company’s strategies and actions by spelling out the company’s overall goal. Ultimately, a mission statement helps guide decision-making internally while also articulating the company’s mission to customers, suppliers, and the community.

It’s important to note the distinction between a mission statement and a slogan. A mission statement is not a marketing tool designed to grab attention quickly. While it should be catchy and memorable, a mission statement is a thoughtful declaration designed to articulate the goals and philosophies of a company. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement differs from a vision statement. A mission statement says what the company currently is; a vision statement states what the company hopes to become. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement is not an evergreen statement. As a company evolves over time, the company’s mission and intent may also change. A good rule of thumb is to revisit the mission statement every five years to see if it needs to be fine-tuned or rewritten. A mission statement will keep your company on track, but it shouldn’t become stale or irrelevant.

What does a mission statement include?

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Social Business Design


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano the name of the game

Social business design – adopting the use of social technology, flattening corporate structure and shifting towards less siloed operational models – helps organizations achieve business objectives as the marketplace becomes more…

Mark Smiciklas believes in “the idea that organizations adopting the use of social technology, flattening their corporate structure and making the shift towards less siloed communication and operational models will be in a better position to achieve their business objectives as the marketplace becomes more digitally connected.” >>>  Leer más “Social Business Design”

Business Objectives vs. User Experience

Here’s a question for you: would you agree that creating a great user experience should be the primary aim of any Web designer? I know what your answer is… and youʼre wrong!

Okay, I admit that not all of you would have answered yes, but most probably did. Somehow, the majority of Web designers have come to believe that creating a great user experience is an end in itself. I think we are deceiving ourselves and doing a disservice to our clients at the same time.

The truth is that business objectives should trump users’ needs every time. Generating a return on investment is more important for a website than keeping users happy. Sounds horrendous, doesn’t it? Before you flame me in the comments, hear me out.


Here’s a question for you: would you agree that creating a great user experience should be the primary aim of any Web designer? I know what your answer is… and youʼre wrong!

Okay, I admit that not all of you would have answered yes, but most probably did. Somehow, the majority of Web designers have come to believe that creating a great user experience is an end in itself. I think we are deceiving ourselves and doing a disservice to our clients at the same time.

The truth is that business objectives should trump users’ needs every time. Generating a return on investment is more important for a website than keeping users happy. Sounds horrendous, doesn’t it? Before you flame me in the comments, hear me out. Leer más “Business Objectives vs. User Experience”

Does Your Culture Support Innovation?

Not surprisingly, the continuous improvement movement failed to produce any overnight successes. Companies that approached continuous improvement as a quick fix soon discovered the error of their ways, usually ending up worse off than before they started. Those that invested the time and effort in making continuous improvement a way of life are still reaping the dividends.

The same thing needs to happen with innovation. To succeed, it needs to become an integral part of how you do business. Innovation requires ways of thinking that must underlie all the process, systems, and management behaviors in an organization. Creating ongoing innovation in an organization needs to be thought of as a long-term process, especially if you are used to reacting to change rather than creating it. Most of all, innovation requires an organizational culture that nourishes and supports it as a way of life rather than as a short-term band-aid for current business problems.


by Holly G. Green

Does Your Culture Support Innovation?There’s a lot of people talking about innovation these days, myself included.

The good news is that business leaders seem to be sitting up and taking notice of this important subject. The bad news is that once a topic becomes popular in the media, people have a tendency to see it as the next “management flavor of the month.” In other words, they perceive it as a quick fix solution rather than a long-term change in the way they do business.

Remember a few decades ago when everyone jumped on the continuous improvement bandwagon? Very quickly, companies of all shapes and sizes began implementing six sigma, lean manufacturing, and other types of process improvement programs. Many had no clue what they were doing or worked hard without a link to overall strategy and success. And most had very unrealistic timelines and expectations for the results they hoped to achieve. Leer más “Does Your Culture Support Innovation?”

Strategic Results

All this planning stuff is just a waste of time if you don’t execute. I’ll be glad to give you a lovely binder with your corporate logo that you can put on your shelf and voila, you have your strategic plan!

Maybe not. What is the real strategic goal? Most likely, increasing the market value of your company – regardless of whether you are private or public. And what makes up market value these days? Well, in the ‘old days’ (20yrs ago?), a company’s value was based on tangibles – stuff it made – things you could touch, taste, smell, hear, see. Not so today – today’s companies’ market valuation includes a sizeable intangible component. Is Google worth $186B because of its servers and software? Apple worth $193B because of its hardware and technology? I posit their market valuation is based on these assets but more on their intangible assets – their culture, people, design, knowledge, experience, social/human network and capital.


All this planning stuff is just a waste of time if you don’t execute. I’ll be glad to give you a lovely binder with your corporate logo that you can put on your shelf and voila, you have your strategic plan!

Maybe not. What is the real strategic goal? Most likely, increasing the market value of your company – regardless of whether you are private or public. And what makes up market value these days? Well, in the ‘old days’ (20yrs ago?), a company’s value was based on tangibles – stuff it made – things you could touch, taste, smell, hear, see. Not so today – today’s companies’ market valuation includes a sizeable intangible component. Is Google worth $186B because of its servers and software? Apple worth $193B because of its hardware and technology? I posit their market valuation is based on these assets but more on their intangible assets – their culture, people, design, knowledge, experience, social/human network and capital. Leer más “Strategic Results”