Integration isn’t just technical for social


I’m seeing more and more of the integrated strategy approach to social in presentation.  Jeremiah’s pitch from Altimeter is spot on in that every touch and channel needs to support engagement.  While on the surface you could see this as a technical set of tasks, it also a set of strategic decisions to make sure your brand is easily available where your customers are.  This slide set demonstrates how to strategically address social in your website, as a channel for interaction.

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The Fragmented Brand Strategy

This post is one in a series on our biggest brand strategy secret here at Distility: That most bad brands can be traced back to a failure of exploration, a failure of commitment or both.
This diagram sums up the way most brands go wrong, and what it takes to get to the holy grail of the authentic brand.


This post is one in a series on our biggest brand strategy secret here at Distility: That most bad brands can be traced back to a failure of exploration, a failure of commitment or both.
This diagram sums up the way most brands go wrong, and what it takes to get to the holy grail of the authentic brand.

Dell CMO on How Social Media Is Helping the Brand

Erin Nelson was named CMO of Dell in January 2009. Prior to her promotion, she served as vp of marketing for Dell in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Prior to joining Dell in 1999, Nelson worked in corporate strategy for Frito-Lay. She recently sat down with Adweek digital media editor Brian Morrissey to discuss the challenges the brand faces, what lessons it learned from Enfatico and how social media is playing a larger role for the company.


Brian Morrissey, Adweek
Erin Nelson was named CMO of Dell in January 2009. Prior to her promotion, she served as vp of marketing for Dell in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Prior to joining Dell in 1999, Nelson worked in corporate strategy for Frito-Lay. She recently sat down with Adweek digital media editor Brian Morrissey to discuss the challenges the brand faces, what lessons it learned from Enfatico and how social media is playing a larger role for the company.

Adweek: What’s the big challenge for the Dell brand?
Erin Nelson:
The last few months have been about discussing a lot of our strengths. The world has transformed a lot. Quite frankly I think we as brand have lost a lot of luster. We’ve been evaluating what for the last 25 years has made us great. Globally we have incredibly strong brand awareness. We’re known for value. In emerging economies like Brazil, China and Russia, we’re doing really well. But when we started looking at figuring where we need to go, we realized the brand needed to transform itself. We’re starting first from the inside. Our purpose is much broader than selling PCs. It’s about allowing people to unleash their potential. Our 95,000 employees need to understand our purpose first. It’s been primarily an internal marketing challenge. For us it was more important this not be just a campaign. It’s the transformation of the company.

AW: Does Apple‘s success make it harder to differentiate in the market with more than a value message?
EN:
We think so. I commend Apple for having beautiful products. They definitely focus on part of the audience that focuses on beautiful design at a price point that’s fairly high. What we’re looking at is consumers that want not just that but someone to enable all their connectivity. I think about what a mom would need or an entire business would need. They need someone who can help them succeed with all different sorts of applications, not just one, someone focused on mobile and desktop computing. We’re focused to make sure we’re bringing all those pieces together. It’s not about how beautiful the design is. A mom isn’t only putting the focus on how beautiful the design is, but also “how do I manage the money in my life, how do I help with the kids’ homework?” She wants someone to be her advocate and enable her to do what she wants to do… Leer más “Dell CMO on How Social Media Is Helping the Brand”

Startup Strategy Roundtable: Validate Your Ideas – ReadWriteStart


tableI started doing my free Online Strategy Roundtables for entrepreneurs in the fall of 2008. Based on this work, I’ve been able to draw a few conclusions.

First, a good percentage of entrepreneurs don’t bother validating their ideas. Another percentage are immediately interested in raising money. Raising money without validating the business is pretty much impossible. If we can address some of these patterns we have a chance at significantly reducing infant entrepreneur mortality.

At this morning’s roundtable I worked with four new entrepreneurs, and this is what I learned.

Sramana Mitra is a technology entrepreneur and strategy consultant in Silicon Valley. She has founded three companies and writes a business blog, Sramana Mitra on Strategy. She has a masters degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her three books, Entrepreneur Journeys, Bootstrapping, Weapon Of Mass Reconstruction, and Positioning: How To Test, Validate, and Bring Your Idea To Market are all available from Amazon. Her new book Vision India 2020 was recently released. Mitra is also a columnist for Forbes and runs the 1M/1M initiative.

Mel Marten presented ClaroConnect, described as being like a match.com for financial advisors and clients.  There was a discussion about the best way to monetize the business, whether charging an annual fee is preferred to monetizing every lead. Then the conversation turned to affiliate marketing.

Albert Santalo with CareCloud was next.  This Internet-based service simplifies the many tasks of the modern medical office. While this business has been validated by a growing list of clients, the positioning of their service needs to be more sharply defined in order to scale the business.  Through much give and take, the importance of segmentation and focusing on the strongest segment of their market was emphasized.

Martin Linkov presented Favit, a product aiming to personally curate and simply present online content.  As a blogger and potential customer, I said I am looking for a service to curate and prioritize what other bloggers are saying about a topic I am blogging about to give my readers a fuller perspective.  But Martin is not looking to answer that need.  He demonstrates how difficult it can be to explain a complex service, while being pressed to succinctly define who the user is for this service, and what is the value proposition for the bloggers who are the stated channel.  The most valuable selling proposition for this service still needs to be defined and validated.

Mark Hernandez pitched his business, After COOL Fitness.  I liked this business idea, there is clearly a need to fill in as physical education and recreation programs are being cut from school budgets.  Currently they are paid by grants and parents.  When I learned of the lopsided ownership structure of the business, I felt Mark’s main priority should be to rework the capital structure of the business while continuing to organically grow the business regionally.

The roundtables are the cornerstone programming of a global initiative that I have started called One Million by One Million (1M/1M). Its mission is to help a million entrepreneurs globally to reach $1 million in revenue and beyond, build $1 trillion in sustainable global GDP, and create 10 million jobs.

In 1M/1M, I teach the EJ Methodology which is based on my Entrepreneur Journeys research, and emphasize bootstrapping, idea validation, and crisp positioning as some of the core principles of building strong fundamentals in early stage ventures.

You can find the recording of this roundtable session here. Recordings of previous roundtables are all available here. You can register for the next roundtable here.

Photo by Laurent Cottier.
http://www.readwriteweb.com/start/2010/03/startup-roundtable-validate-your-ideas.php

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McCann N.Y. Bolsters Planning


Ex-R/GA exec Anne Benvenuto takes behavioral lead

– Andrew McMains

adweek/photos/stylus/131327-AnneBenvenuto.jpgAnne Benvenuto

McCann Erickson, in a bid to underscore the expanding role of planning in the development of client business ideas, has added a third leader to its New York planning department and directed each to focus on a specific aspect of the discipline.

The new leader is Anne Benvenuto, former director of strategic services at Interpublic Group’s R/GA, who becomes director of behavioral planning at McCann. At the same time, co-directors of strategic planning Devika Bulchandani and John Kottmann have shifted to director of brand planning and director of business strategy and analytics, respectively.

Each executive shares leadership of the 35-person department and reports to McCann N.Y. president Thom Gruhler.

Historically, IPG‘s McCann has been known for its brand planning, which stemmed from an understanding of consumer attitudes toward brands. This move attempts to expand that capability into behavioral research and business analytics.

“We have a very well-developed muscle” in brand planning, Gruhler said. “What we have been doing is dabbling in the other parts of the equation, which is what consumers are doing and how they’re behaving. It’s my personal philosophy that the closer our ideas are to what we know about consumers and what they’re actually doing, the more likely, the more easy [and] the more measurable our ideas will be for clients to purchase.”

Of course, the data that comforts clients can also confound them, and that’s where smart planners can make a difference, according to Gruhler.

“The best use of our skills is not in analytics. It’s in synthesis,” Gruhler said, with a nod to a recent speech by former McDonald’s marketing chief Larry Light at the American Association of Advertising Agencies‘ Transformation conference in San Francisco. “We’re going to have a lot of information, more and more information at our fingertips. And those of us who will win in the end are the best synthesizers of what that means.”

Benvenuto, 55, spent nearly six years at R/GA in New York, where she oversaw three departments: insights/planning, analytics and connections. Her clients there included Walmart, Subaru, Johnson & Johnson, Purina and S.C. Johnson. She left in October and had been working as a freelance consultant when she agreed to join McCann. Leer más “McCann N.Y. Bolsters Planning”