Exitosas empresas nacieron en el garaje


Algunas de las firmas más importantes del mundo se originaron en el fondo de un hogar y lograron expandirse a niveles insospechados. Conozca cuáles son
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Comenzaron en un garaje y crecieron hasta cruzar las fonteras de sus países.

De hecho, se convirtieron en grandes negocios que actualmente son inmensas fábricas donde se define parte de la economía global.

En la actualidad las utilidades de esas compañías, según Eurobrands, superan los u$s344 mil millones, cifra que sacaría de apuros a cientos de empresas en crisis.

Según informa Dinero.com, ellas son:

1. Apple
Comenzó en el garaje de la casa de Steve Jobs a mediados de los años 70s.

El padre de Steve, Paul Jobs, tuvo que sacar sus herramientas para que su hijo pudiera trabajar con Stephen Wozniak en el diseño de los primeros aparatos de Apple.

Actualmente es la empresa más valiosa del mundo y cuesta u$s130 mil millones.

Leer más “Exitosas empresas nacieron en el garaje”

Subastan a precio récord una de las primeras computadoras de Apple


 

El modelo 1 fue diseñado y construido por Steve Wozniak, y comercializado después por el propio Wozniak y Steve Jobs a través de una cadena de electrónica

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Una casa de subastas alemana ha anunciado la venta por casi medio millón de euros de una Apple 1, la primera computadora vendida por el fallecido Steve Jobs.

 

Según Uwe Rechner, portavoz de la casa de subastas Auction Team Breker, el precio pagado marca un nuevo récord para computadoras de ese tipo. La identidad del comprador se mantiene en secreto. Leer más “Subastan a precio récord una de las primeras computadoras de Apple”

Steve Jobs, Apple | MARKETER OF THE YEAR 2010

Apple CEO Steve Jobs is having none of this. As everyone knows, Apple’s success is based at least in part on opacity. The brand has no Facebook or Twitter page, doesn’t respond to media requests (including one from this publication) and sometimes uses heavy-handed tactics to censor information. Apple’s mania for secrecy reached its apogee with the iPad.

While some news outlets accurately predicted the device’s debut (and its name!) seven months early, not a peep came from headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., until Jobs’ official announcement on Jan. 27. By then, bloggers had whipped up so much buzz that the iPad announcement nearly eclipsed the State of the Union address the next day.


By Todd Wasserman

In 2010, the standard advice for marketers is: Be transparent. Embrace social media. Start a dialogue with your audience.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs is having none of this. As everyone knows, Apple’s success is based at least in part on opacity. The brand has no Facebook or Twitter page, doesn’t respond to media requests (including one from this publication) and sometimes uses heavy-handed tactics to censor information. Apple’s mania for secrecy reached its apogee with the iPad.

While some news outlets accurately predicted the device’s debut (and its name!) seven months early, not a peep came from headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., until Jobs’ official announcement on Jan. 27. By then, bloggers had whipped up so much buzz that the iPad announcement nearly eclipsed the State of the Union address the next day.

It’s easy to conclude now, as sales of the iPad have surpassed 3 million units, that the device’s success was preordained. But industry watchers credit the marketing. Leer más “Steve Jobs, Apple | MARKETER OF THE YEAR 2010”

What President Obama Can Learn From Steve Jobs

I have long held that the most qualified people to be in government are business folk. Not just Billionaires like Mayor Bloomberg, but anyone who has successfully run anything, been responsible for making payrolls, paying back loans, paying bills on time, navigating through good times and bad. Most important: balancing a budget. But the reality is most people who have these credentials are too smart to get sucked into the dysfunction of the public sector. Nor will they submit themselves to the relentless intrusion and scrutiny of the press. So what’s the next best thing for the “beleaguered” President? Take some lessons from the guys who know how to really get things done. And who better than the best CEO in the Universe: Steve Jobs.


obama jobs

The sunlight of summer has begun it’s annual transition to equinox, and we are all reviving the pulse of the work-year.The President has returned from Martha’s Vineyard to face what will surely be a challenging fall.  It’s mid-term election season and the mood of the voting public is downright ornery.

ODS (Obama Disappointment Syndrome) a growing wave of depression, has created a huge anti-incumbent wave.  “Throw ‘em all out!” seems to be the mantra of the season.

In the last couple of weeks the number of negative op-eds on the President from both sides of the aisle have grown considerably.  The mildest theme seems to be “he is too smart to be in touch with the people,” or “we just don’t know who you are or what you really are about Mr. President.”  The really challenging ones drift into the inevitable issues of racism.
Leer más “What President Obama Can Learn From Steve Jobs”

The meaning of the apple symbol


Apples are an all-American success story-each ...
Image via Wikipedia

Steve Jobs had worked during the summer at an apple farm, and admired the Beatles’ record label, Apple. He also believed Apples to be the most perfect fruit. He and Steve Wozniak were trying to figure out a name for their new company, and they decided that if they couldn’t think of one by the end of the day that was better than Apple, they would choose Apple. They couldn’t think of anything better, so on April 1, 1976, Apple Computer, Inc. was born.

But they needed a logo. The first design included Sir Isaac Newton, a tree and a banner that said “Apple Computer.” Jobs decided they needed a less busy logo, one that would signify a brand. The second logo attempt was very similar to the current logo, but without the bite taken out of it. Jobs thought this logo looked too much like an orange. The third attempt was the logo that Apple still uses.

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