Startup Websites for Design Inspiration | vandelaydesign.com


 

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Whenever I’m looking for design inspiration, i always end up on startup websites. They are, in my opinion, the best of the best in terms of what you can see online. And this, for one simple reason. The performance of a startup, online, directly correlates to how well designed their website is. This is why startup websites act as a great guide for me in my design process.

I think there is no better inspiration.

Below are 50 of the best startup site designs that i have seen out there, for your inspiration.

If you have any more, then let me know in the comments!

Enjoy.

StatusBoard

StatusBoard

This startup makes it easier to have an overview of your projects with a beautiful and easy interface.

Fundable

Fundable

Fundable is a crowdfunding startup based on rewards and equity.

A Small Orange

A Small Orange

A Small Orange provides web hosting to users in an innovatively small local business type of way.

TripLingo

TripLingo

With its hugely innovative app, TripLingo makes it super easy to learn a local language when you’re abroad.

Woothemes

Woothemes

Woothemes provides custom wordpress themes for all types of web publishers. Including both ecommerce stores and blogs.

Referly

Referly

Referly is a pinterest like site, where users earn more for referring items.

NotAnotherBill

NotAnotherBill

Not another bill is a unique startup out of the UK that sends interesting mails to users around the country. The mails include interesting gifts, such as a unique sundial or a vintage compass. Leer más “Startup Websites for Design Inspiration | vandelaydesign.com”

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The Lifestyle of an Internet Entrepreneur

Outsourcing parts of your business can be a great strategy, but one that needs careful management.

If your business chooses to outsource some of its activities, a part of your time or someone else’s will still be required to manage projects, and hire staff and/or freelancers to contribute to the business.

As a founder or co-founder of your web business, you have the important task of driving its strategic direction. You wouldn’t want your business to be completely run on auto pilot without any input from yourself.

This brings to question a related issue about what sort of lifestyle an entrepreneur has. Will you have a dreaded lifestyle that consists of working relentless long hours with little time for recreation? Or will you have a leisurely lifestyle that consists of working only a few hours a day?


Ask successful internet entrepreneurs what it takes to create a successful business online, and the majority will say that it takes a great deal of hard work and perseverance to succeed.

Earlier this year, I read Daniel Scocco’s post at Daily Blog Tips on the working methods of 12 top online entrepreneurs.

A successful online entrepreneur himself, Daniel interviewed twelve well known and successful online entrepreneurs to find out what their typical work week looked like, and what they enjoyed doing when not working.

The line up of successful online entrepreneurs included Darren Rowse, Aaron Wall, Neil Patel, Yaro Starak, Chris Garrett and Collis Ta’eed. The interviews revealed that the majority of these entrepreneurs worked over 60 hours a week, 7 days a week. One entrepreneur – Dan Schawbel – works a staggering 110 hours a week.

Being an internet entrepreneur is hard work, and Collis at Envato makes no bones about this in his course on building a blog business. Here’s a few relevant quotes from the eBook, “How to Build a Successful Blog Business”:

“So building a business out of blogging, like any business, involves investment both in time and money.”

“Like any business, it will take hard work, dedication, savvy, and a bit of luck.”

“There are bloggers making considerable amounts of money, and in fact two of the case studies in this book record how two blogs have worked their way into five and six-figures per month in revenue. However, like most things in life, it takes a lot of work.” Leer más “The Lifestyle of an Internet Entrepreneur”

How to Bootstrap Your New Business Wisely

Starting a business is tough—and that goes double when you’re starting a business in an economic environment this challenging. If you’re bootstrapping (and chances are good that you’re using your own money to fund the company) it’s important to use your resources as efficiently as possible, You want to protect your capital but also invest where it counts most. I’ve been helping businesses for years, and here is what successful bootstrappers know:
Control fixed expenses

At some point—usually when you need to bring other people aboard to accommodate growth—you’ll probably need an office. Until then, work from home and use e-mail and cell phones to communicate, so you can minimize fixed expenses like office space and furniture.
Use contractors as much as possible

Avoid hiring people even when you need additional help. By using contractors you can save significant capital when compared to hiring employees (BusinessWeek.com, October/November, 2007). Your per-hour costs may be higher for projects, but you don’t have to deal with payroll taxes, benefits or workers’ comp, and you have a lot more spending flexibility because when there is no work, you don’t have to pay. Just beware of IRS rules differentiating employees vs. contractors – the government is cracking down on companies that treat contractors like employees.


stick figures working 150Starting a business is tough—and that goes double when you’re starting a business in an economic environment this challenging. If you’re bootstrapping (and chances are good that you’re using your own money to fund the company) it’s important to use your resources as efficiently as possible, You want to protect your capital but also invest where it counts most. I’ve been helping businesses for years, and here is what successful bootstrappers know:

Control fixed expenses

At some point—usually when you need to bring other people aboard to accommodate growth—you’ll probably need an office. Until then, work from home and use e-mail and cell phones to communicate, so you can minimize fixed expenses like office space and furniture.

Use contractors as much as possible

Avoid hiring people even when you need additional help. By using contractors you can save significant capital when compared to hiring employees (BusinessWeek.com, October/November, 2007). Your per-hour costs may be higher for projects, but you don’t have to deal with payroll taxes, benefits or workers’ comp, and you have a lot more spending flexibility because when there is no work, you don’t have to pay. Just beware of IRS rules differentiating employees vs. contractors – the government is cracking down on companies that treat contractors like employees. Leer más “How to Bootstrap Your New Business Wisely”

Startups: Go Lean or Go Home – Usability and Getting it right

Dan Olsen has prepared another interesting presentation which was delivered at the Web 2.0 Expo in SF. While I see directionally where the presentation is going and can easily understand the fundamentals put forth, I’m left a little bit wanting, since it implies that build technology quickly that users like and do it efficiently and you will be successful. More specifically, here is what Dan said @ in an interview for his pitch at the Web 2.0 expo:

My fundamental philosophy on product management… you need to start with a user-centric point of view, Dan Olsen

I’ve got a good deal of respect and appreciation for Dan’s approach to using a metric based approach to feature prioritization and he is really interesting to talk to about this topic since he is passionate about usability. Dan’s latest endeavor YourVersion is a live example of his methodology in action – he eats his own dog food around early stage companies and has a proven track record with this approach.


Flickr, a Web 2.
Image via Wikipedia

Posted by Jon Gatrell
May 7, 2010

Dan Olsen has prepared another interesting presentation which was delivered at the Web 2.0 Expo in SF.  While I see directionally where the presentation is going and can easily understand the fundamentals put forth, I’m left a little bit wanting, since it implies that build technology quickly that users like and do it efficiently and you will be successful.  More specifically, here is what Dan said @ in an interview for his pitch at the Web 2.0 expo:

My fundamental philosophy on product management… you need to start with a user-centric point of view, Dan Olsen Leer más “Startups: Go Lean or Go Home – Usability and Getting it right”

Are Incubators and Angels Gaining Leverage On Larger VC Firms? – ReadWriteStart


ycombinator_logo_mar10.jpgBeing a resident of the Phoenix area, which is a significant distance from Silicon Valley, I wasn’t able to attend the Demo Day show-and-tell pitch-fest at the end of Y Combinator (YC), but luckily, other reporters were there and have been slowly releasing stories about the companies and the event. Peter Kafka of All Things Digital published a video interview Thursday with YC co-founder Paul Graham from Demo Day in which he provides some interesting insights into how the investment community is rebounding and possibly how incubators are beginning to have influence on the larger VC firms.

This group of YC grads included 26 companies, of which 20-25% Graham would expect statistically to go on to receive Series A funding. However, this number could potentially be higher with this newest class as Graham has seen a drastic change in the attitudes of the investors.

“Judging by the reactions of investors, the recessions seems to be over,” Graham said in his interview with Kafka. “I don’t think we’ve ever had a batch that had so much investor interest so early as this one.”

As Graham points out, some of the companies had spoken with or secured angel funding well before demo day – another surprise, he says. An interesting opinion he shared in his interview included the idea that it is hard to place a statistical number on how many companies emerge from YC to become “successful” businesses. Who defines what “successful” is?

paul_graham_mar10.jpgGraham says that historically, 70% of YC companies have raised additional funding since leaving the program, or have not needed to because they managed to become profitable without additional help. But how does Graham truly gauge success for the entrepreneurs? “The founders end up rich, basically. That’s the definition,” he says.

The other interesting quote Graham gave during his brief interview sparked an interesting thought in my mind about the state of the start-up and investment community as a whole. When Kafka suggested that angel investors tend to get squeezed how by more powerful VC firms that flood companies with cash in future rounds of funding, Graham replied that firms would be foolish to attempt this with YC startups. To paraphrase, Graham basically said, “The firms wouldn’t dare squeeze out the angels on YC companies because that would mean they would be squeezing us too, and that wouldn’t be wise if they wanted to continue to have access to our alumni.”

What this got me thinking about is how the growing popularity of incubator programs like Y Combinator and TechStars is affecting the venture capital community. Are firms less likely to squeeze out angel investors from these kinds of companies because the incubators continually graduate companies with high potential? Is Graham saying that if the VCs want continued access to the best startups around that they had better play nice with the angels?

If so, is this good or bad for the startup community? If this is really having a significant impact on how VC firms approach these companies, then it surely benefits the angel investors, but do the startups ultimately gain anything from it? I wonder if there has been a case of VC firms deciding not to invest in a YC company because they would rather be able to have more control over term negotiations.

I would think that a VC firm would be more interested in the opportunity to work with high-potential companies than in a power struggle in the board room, but I could be wrong. Or I could just be over analyzing a simple quote.

Photo by Flickr user pragdave.
http://www.readwriteweb.com/start/2010/03/are-incubators-and-angels-gaining-leverage-on-larger-vc-firms.php

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Robin Low: A Guide To Entrepreneurship


Got my final results yesterday and honestly, I wasn’t too please with the  overall scores. Sure, I could have done better if I put in more effort but teenage angst got the better of me. In light of the results, I started thinking about my future career. Would I be happier working for someone else or pursue something that’s lingering at the back of my mind; being my own boss.

There are a couple of fantastic people that chose the latter such as Pat Law. She recently resigned from Ogilvy and moved forward to pursue the entrepreneurial side of her by setting up a social influence studio called GOODSTUPH. I got to say that takes a lot of courage to leave your own comfort zone.

Recently, I picked up a tweet from Robin Low where he announced that he has an e-book on Slideshare on the mindset of entrepreneurship. The book is a comprehensive guide for aspiring entrepreneurs to learn from. Here’s a quote from his book describing what entrepreneurship is:

Entrepreneurship is taking the responsibility and risk of starting a new business in response to identified opportunities. An entrepreneur is a person who is willing and able to convert a new idea or invention into a successful innovation or business.

Hopefully, all of you learned something from his e-book, I sure did. I’m looking forward to the lessons learnt from all of you after reading the e-book.

Entrepreneurship Mindset

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ReadWriteStart Weekly Wrapup


By now, South by Southwest is wrapping up and the legions of nerds and geeks that partied heartily over the last two weeks are slowly crawling back to their homes with their SXSW hangovers. Here at ReadWriteStart, we’ve kept on truckin’ through that time, so here is this week’s Weekly Wrapup. This week we discuss whether tracking pageviews is still worth it, how micropayments and subscriptions could be the future of startup business models, which mobile platform is best for small business development, and how credibility is your best friend.

The Death of the Pageview

guest_pageviews_0310.jpgThe Web has hit a point where tracking pageviews is useless for startups.

There was a time when all you needed to succeed on the Internet were lots and lots of eyeballs, and the best way of measuring those eyeballs was by tracking pageviews (measuring exactly which pages on a website are viewed by individual visitors). The dot-com crash showed us that the eyeball-based business model was a failure.

Micropayments and Subscriptions: How Business Models for Startups are Shifting

pennies_mar10.jpgBack in early February, while aboard a red-eye to New York, Dave McClure wrote a long, humorous, rambling, profanity-laden rant of a blog post that focused on startup business models. While it makes for an entertaining read, McClure’s post is also very insightful and makes a solid case for why startups should shift from advertising models and instead build their new businesses on subscriptions and micropayments. Earlier this month I had the chance to visit the headquarters of ZooLoo, a startup that witnessed this very shift first-hand with their own business model. Leer más “ReadWriteStart Weekly Wrapup”