Content, Content, Content

…it likes to be free according to this very entertaining presentation from Mike Ellis. While that may in fact be the case, remember that you should probably have a strategy for your content as a marketer. As you develop content and set it free, there are some key questions a marketer should ask since while content should be set free, it’s not free to develop:

* Is this intended for the buyer/Analyst/Partners/Sales/Others?
* How will this content influence your audience to do some?
* How does this relate to your existing content/strategy?
* Does this establish a new content theme, if not related to previous content and is it a sustainable theme?
* Is the content reusable?

If you love your content, set it free (v3.0)

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…it likes to be free according to this very entertaining presentation from Mike Ellis.  While that may in fact be the case, remember that you should probably have a strategy for your content as a marketer.   As you develop content and set it free, there are some key questions a marketer should ask since while content should be set free, it’s not free to develop:

  • Is this intended for the buyer/Analyst/Partners/Sales/Others?
  • How will this content influence your audience to do some?
  • How does this relate to your existing content/strategy?
  • Does this establish a new content theme, if not related to previous content and is it a sustainable theme?
  • Is the content reusable?

 

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B2B Marketers and Buyers need to interact differently


So I spent some time the other day writing about the 7 expectations of a social buyer and the more I thought about it, it became evident that it isn’t the expectations of a social buyer, but more so buyers in general in a connected world.  We ultimately need to address the needs of the buyer as much, if not more than the sales force as B2B marketers.  Selling is one thing, buying is definitely another and it is that later that has changed with the emergence social for all industries.

With so many social options out there for buyers, the sourcing for products/solutions is different and so is the expectations of the availability of information and offers.  Remember when the RFP or the trade show was the best way to source options?  Those day are gone for many of us B2B technology marketers.  Buyers want information on their time lines (or at least their managers).  So as I think more about the expectations of buyers, I’m going to write a little more detail on each of the 7 items buyers expect and maybe even change them a little bit over time as I write, but as of now here is where I am when thinking out buyers and their expectations:

7 Expectations of a Buyer Leer más “B2B Marketers and Buyers need to interact differently”

Integration isn’t just technical for social


I’m seeing more and more of the integrated strategy approach to social in presentation.  Jeremiah’s pitch from Altimeter is spot on in that every touch and channel needs to support engagement.  While on the surface you could see this as a technical set of tasks, it also a set of strategic decisions to make sure your brand is easily available where your customers are.  This slide set demonstrates how to strategically address social in your website, as a channel for interaction.

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37 Things you probably haven’t heard at your software company

I was reminded the other day of the Dilbert cartoon above and it got me to thinking about what other stuff we might not hear around the office at a software company as product managers and product marketing folks.


Posted by Jon Gatrell

I was reminded the other day of the Dilbert cartoon above and it got me to thinking about what other stuff we might not hear around the office at a software company as product managers and product marketing folks. Leer más “37 Things you probably haven’t heard at your software company”

Selling to the CIO? Getting to know your buyer


After looking at the plight of the CIO earlier this week, I thought it might be good to post this presentation too.  It appears that CIO’s aren’t big fans of cold calls, but who is? In an world where getting someone’s attention is the first critical step for marketers and sales people alike, it appears that doing the research and understanding what is and what is not relevant is the first step to getting into the funnel with a CIO as a potential buyer for your product.

CIO: Leverage what you have and oh yeah, a little innovation please


Posted by Jon Gatrell

I was talking to a friend the other day about his role as a CIO at a large fast food chain and he was always challenged to reduce his spend and do more with what he already had in production.  Not a very good sign if your trying to sell technology products.   What transpired during this conversation is very similar to the issues set forth in the slide presentation from Abbie Lundberg. After leaving CIO.com it still appears she has the flair for the dramatic with the title of the presentation, but is it dramatic or a reality? One thing is sure, the role of CIO is changing according to Thomas Wailgum at CIO.com per a recent survey of CIO’s – “Given the… warning signs, it’s easy to speculate that the CIO’s role and the department’s sovereign power might be slip-sliding away.”

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Startups: Go Lean or Go Home – Usability and Getting it right

Dan Olsen has prepared another interesting presentation which was delivered at the Web 2.0 Expo in SF. While I see directionally where the presentation is going and can easily understand the fundamentals put forth, I’m left a little bit wanting, since it implies that build technology quickly that users like and do it efficiently and you will be successful. More specifically, here is what Dan said @ in an interview for his pitch at the Web 2.0 expo:

My fundamental philosophy on product management… you need to start with a user-centric point of view, Dan Olsen

I’ve got a good deal of respect and appreciation for Dan’s approach to using a metric based approach to feature prioritization and he is really interesting to talk to about this topic since he is passionate about usability. Dan’s latest endeavor YourVersion is a live example of his methodology in action – he eats his own dog food around early stage companies and has a proven track record with this approach.


Flickr, a Web 2.
Image via Wikipedia

Posted by Jon Gatrell
May 7, 2010

Dan Olsen has prepared another interesting presentation which was delivered at the Web 2.0 Expo in SF.  While I see directionally where the presentation is going and can easily understand the fundamentals put forth, I’m left a little bit wanting, since it implies that build technology quickly that users like and do it efficiently and you will be successful.  More specifically, here is what Dan said @ in an interview for his pitch at the Web 2.0 expo:

My fundamental philosophy on product management… you need to start with a user-centric point of view, Dan Olsen Leer más “Startups: Go Lean or Go Home – Usability and Getting it right”