25 Free SEO Add-ons for Mozilla Firefox

If you use the popular web browser Firefox and are interested in building up your freelancing business by using search engine optimization techniques, you’re in luck. There are many free SEO add-ons available for Firefox.

In this post, I’ll share 25 SEO add-ons and explain why freelancers might wish to download SEO tools to their browser.

# SEO Toolbar–This toolbar is fully customizable. There are several different views available, including icons and text, icons only or page ranks only (PageRank, Alexa Rank and PI Rank).
# SEO Professional Toolbar–Offers many SEO-related tools in one place. Display PageRank, S-Rank and the number of backlinks for visited pages. This toolbar also stores the history of ranks for selected sites. Highlight words, links, view number of words and more.
# SEOpen–Includes tools for Google backlinks, Yahoo backlinks, PageRank checker, and http header viewer.
# Swoosty SEO Tools–A tool that automatically shows the Google PageRank and Alexa ranking of all the sites you visit, and provides other essential tools for complete analysis. You can also activate and deactivate it without having to restart Firefox.

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If you use the popular web browser Firefox and are interested in building up your freelancing business by using search engine optimization techniques, you’re in luck. There are many free SEO add-ons available for Firefox.

In this post, I’ll share 25 SEO add-ons and explain why freelancers might wish to download SEO tools to their browser.

25 Firefox SEO Add-ons

Here are 25 free search engine optimization add-ons that you can add to Firefox. (Note: although all of these tools are available free of charge, some tools do have a suggested donation to cover development costs.) Leer más “25 Free SEO Add-ons for Mozilla Firefox”

Cómo han cambiado el branding las redes sociales

Pero con 500 millones de usuarios de Facebook, más todos los que se encuentran en otras redes como Twitter, hacen que el reto merezca la pena. El 52% de los encuestados cree que las redes sociales les han dado la oportunidad de alcanzar a nuevos consumidores. El sector se encuentra dividido prácticamente a la mitad en cuanto a si estos sitios les ayudan a crear marca, con un 35% que cree que sí y un 30% que dice que no.

La gran mayoría de los encuestados están de acuerdo en que es necesario redefinir los conceptos de producto y servicio, y en que el mensaje debe ser distribuid a través de distintos canales incluidos los social media, así como con RRPP. También coincidieron en que la forma más efectiva de comunciar es siendo transparente.


Las redes sociales han cambiado la forma en la que se comunican los consumidores entre ellos y han dado la oportunidad a las marcas la oportunidad de que el boca-oreja sobre sus productos y servicios pueda ser tan amplio como nunca antes. Pero también ha transformado radicalmente las relaciones de poder entre consumidores y anunciantes. Las marcas ya no son las únicas que controlan el mensaje.

Según un estudio de MiresBall y KRC Research, el 40% de los representantes de marcas de todo el mundo sienten que las redes sociales les implican nuevos retos para la integridad de la marca. Además, el 34% de ellos cree que los social media han afectado significativamente como para tener que hacer cambios en la estrategia de marketing. Leer más “Cómo han cambiado el branding las redes sociales”

Following the Money in the Social Media Advertising Boom

Citing a recovering economy and increasing marketer interest in the space, research company eMarketer recently raised its 2010 spending forecast for advertising on social networks by nearly 30% to $1.68 billion domestically.

Within the social media world, however, a number of trends are dictating how, why and where money gets spent — trends that will push the industry past the $2 billion mark in 2011, according to eMarketer’s projections.
A Snowball Effect at Facebook

Not surprisingly, the biggest beneficiary of the current euphoria around social is Facebook (Facebook), with several estimates now pegging the company’s 2010 revenue at better than $1 billion. That growth is being fueled in part by what some advertisers see as competition to scoring prime advertising space on the site.

“Most of our clients see a real need to spend a lot on Facebook ads … the amount of dollars other brands have spent has forced spends up overall,” says Andrea Wolinetz, a partner at MEC Global, which represents the likes of Ikea, AT&T, and Citi. “There’s so much noise and clutter on Facebook now, that spending a good deal has become important in order to be heard.”

There’s also a growing sense that social media advertising can deliver a return on investment. Neil Kleiner, head of social media at Havas Media UK, says “We’ve found advertising on social networks to be very effective, but mainly as a part of a larger piece of activity that involved more ‘traditional’ social media techniques … ads on social media work best when they drive interaction and engagement. Interaction and engagement can then drive purchase.”

Kleiner, whose firm does work for brands ranging from McDonalds to Warner Brothers, adds that Facebook advertising has become a “default for most brands as a part of their media spend.”


Adam Ostrow

Money ImageThis post originally appeared on Forbes.com, where Mashable regularly contributes articles about social media, business and technology.

Citing a recovering economy and increasing marketer interest in the space, research company eMarketer recently raised its 2010 spending forecast for advertising on social networks by nearly 30% to $1.68 billion domestically.

Within the social media world, however, a number of trends are dictating how, why and where money gets spent — trends that will push the industry past the $2 billion mark in 2011, according to eMarketer’s projections.


A Snowball Effect at Facebook


Not surprisingly, the biggest beneficiary of the current euphoria around social is Facebook (Facebook), with several estimates now pegging the company’s 2010 revenue at better than $1 billion. That growth is being fueled in part by what some advertisers see as competition to scoring prime advertising space on the site.

“Most of our clients see a real need to spend a lot on Facebook ads … the amount of dollars other brands have spent has forced spends up overall,” says Andrea Wolinetz, a partner at MEC Global, which represents the likes of Ikea, AT&T, and Citi. “There’s so much noise and clutter on Facebook now, that spending a good deal has become important in order to be heard.”

There’s also a growing sense that social media advertising can deliver a return on investment. Neil Kleiner, head of social media at Havas Media UK, says “We’ve found advertising on social networks to be very effective, but mainly as a part of a larger piece of activity that involved more ‘traditional’ social media techniques … ads on social media work best when they drive interaction and engagement. Interaction and engagement can then drive purchase.”

Kleiner, whose firm does work for brands ranging from McDonalds to Warner Brothers, adds that Facebook advertising has become a “default for most brands as a part of their media spend.”


Twitter’s Experimental Phase


Promoted Tweets

After years of fielding questions about how it plans to make money, Twitter (Twitter) has launched numerous experimental business models over the past several months. At the forefront is Promoted Tweets, a program that inserts a brand-sponsored topic into Twitter’s “trending topics” list and presents a tweet from that sponsor to users, in hopes of generating retweets, replies and other forms of engagement.

Early testers of the program include Virgin America and Coca-Cola, the latter of which reported 86 million impressions and an “engagement rate” of 6% back when it used the program in June during the World Cup. More recently, the online brokerage firm Zecco reported that engagement on its promoted tweets was 50% higher than its regular tweets, with “200 to 300% increases in some cases.”

Case studies are still limited, though. Kleiner says, “Promoted Tweets have not seen that much traction [with my clients],” though he sees an opportunity to “add real value to a long tail of advertisers.” For the moment though, that long tail is mostly left out of Promoted Tweets, as the program remains in limited beta.

As the program sees public rollout later this year, the results could be significant for Twitter and advertisers. In its report, eMarketer wrote that it expects “spending on the microblogging service [to] be low in 2010,” but adds that, “the potential for 2011 and beyond could be dramatic if it proves that its ‘resonance’ model of measuring advertising effectiveness works.”


Location Excites Marketers, Maybe More than Consumers


Location Image

The latest extension of social — knowing not just what your friends are doing but where they’re doing it — is one of the hottest trends of the year.

The field collectively referred to as “location” has marketers from Starbucks to Best Buy excited about the possibilities of increasing foot traffic through programs that reward customers for “checking in” and sharing their location and brand affinity with their friends.

That said, such programs are largely experimental, and many of the startups in the space lack the critical mass to significantly move the needle for big brands. “Foursquare is the buzz word on a lot of people’s lips,” says Kleiner, “but it has such a comparatively small audience that are niche to the point of incestuous. It’s mainly used by people that work in marketing, not ‘normal’ people.”

Still, getting started in the location realm requires less of an investment than competing for space on Facebook, says Wolinetz. “We spend a lot of our time testing and focusing interest in location-based services and Twitter, as our clients are eager to ‘master’ these emerging platforms, and [they] generally require less of a paid media investment than Facebook does.“

Kleiner concedes that he’s bullish on the potential of Facebook getting into location with the recent launch of Places, though the tools aren’t yet there for advertisers. “We will have some real mass to play with when Facebook allows advertisers to buy against location,” he said.


Social No Longer Sits at the Kids’ Table


While the market sorts out the winners and losers from a platform perspective, one thing that’s becoming clear is that social — which eMarketer estimates will account for 6.7% of total online ad spend this year — is being thought of in a much broader light than even the increasingly optimistic projections show.

“Social campaigns used to be more siloed from the rest of the communications and marketing strategies,” says Wolinetz, “but now we’re seeing social as either an extension of an overall activation idea that occurs throughout other media outlets, or conversely, the marketing/communication strategy is at its heart and inception social, and we’re using other media outlets to drive awareness and scale.”

And while that might mean social’s share of ad dollars is still relatively small, its importance within organizations is as high as it has ever been. “The biggest shift for us is that we are now seeing brands move away from pure campaign planning altogether and are allowing social media to be the bedrock for a 24-7, 365 days a year chance to engage their customers,” says Kleiner.

With increasing interest in social media marketing among advertisers, we’re excited to see where the industry will go in the next year. Let us know your thoughts on the topic in the comments below.

http://mashable.com/2010/09/10/social-media-advertising-boom/

How The Fashion Industry Is Embracing Social Media

This is the first post by Rebecca Schatz our newest employee here at Simply Zesty in which she combines her two loves…Fashion and social media…

Although the fashion industry has arrived relatively recently onto the social media scene, it’s making an impact now that it’s finally here. Certain high-end luxury brands are still choosing billboards over blogs (perhaps for fear of their brand losing its perceived ‘exclusivity’ in the social media switchover), however, the fashion industry is generally taking to it like a Chanel-clad duck to water. Let’s have a look at how the trendsetters and trailblazers have started to set the world of social media alight.
Social Networking Success

One brand successfully flying the Facebook flag is Urban Outfitters. When it comes to successful community sites, original content is king. Urban Outfitters’ US strategy recognizes that community site visitors are looking for something more than mere advertising shill. Despite the fact that, with 320,000 likes, the brand is lagging behind some of its rivals (H&M has over 3 million likes), Urban Outfitter’s Facebook page is streets ahead when it comes to social media strategy: every week, the page features an exclusive clip of the new comedy series The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret. Visitors are also enticed with fan discounts, original photographic content, tips on garment care and Facebook-only competitions. In August, the company introduced a novel way to engage visitors by organizing items on the main website according to the number of ‘likes’ they receive on Facebook. Not only does this encourage Facebook fans to interact with the profile and drive traffic to the main website, it also prompts non-Facebook fans visiting the site to ‘like’ the company’s Facebook page.


Author of How The Fashion Industry Is Embracing Social Media

by Niall & Lauren

Ebay How The Fashion Industry Is Embracing Social Media

This is the first post by Rebecca Schatz our newest employee here at Simply Zesty in which she combines her two loves…Fashion and social media…

Although the fashion industry has arrived relatively recently onto the social media scene, it’s making an impact now that it’s finally here. Certain high-end luxury brands are still choosing billboards over blogs (perhaps for fear of their brand losing its perceived ‘exclusivity’ in the social media switchover), however, the fashion industry is generally taking to it like a Chanel-clad duck to water. Let’s have a look at how the trendsetters and trailblazers have started to set the world of social media alight.

Social Networking Success

One brand successfully flying the Facebook flag is Urban Outfitters. When it comes to successful community sites, original content is king. Urban Outfitters’ US strategy recognizes that community site visitors are looking for something more than mere advertising shill. Despite the fact that, with 320,000 likes, the brand is lagging behind some of its rivals (H&M has over 3 million likes), Urban Outfitter’s Facebook page is streets ahead when it comes to social media strategy: every week, the page features an exclusive clip of the new comedy series The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret. Visitors are also enticed with fan discounts, original photographic content, tips on garment care and Facebook-only competitions. In August, the company introduced a novel way to engage visitors by organizing items on the main website according to the number of ‘likes’ they receive on Facebook. Not only does this encourage Facebook fans to interact with the profile and drive traffic to the main website, it also prompts non-Facebook fans visiting the site to ‘like’ the company’s Facebook page. Leer más “How The Fashion Industry Is Embracing Social Media”

How Social Media Is Changing Brand Marketing

Social media has changed much about how consumers communicate with one another, and has given them the ability to broadcast opinions about brands, products and services further than traditional word-of-mouth can reach. It has also meant something that can be scary for brands: Marketers are no longer fully in control of the message.

According to a study from branding agency MiresBall and KRC Research, 40% of brand representatives around the world felt social media posed new challenges to the integrity of their brand. More than a third said that social networking sites affected brands significantly enough to bring about changes in marketing strategy.


Four in 10 brand marketers think social creates new challenges to maintaining brand integrity

Social media has changed much about how consumers communicate with one another, and has given them the ability to broadcast opinions about brands, products and services further than traditional word-of-mouth can reach. It has also meant something that can be scary for brands: Marketers are no longer fully in control of the message.

According to a study from branding agency MiresBall and KRC Research, 40% of brand representatives around the world felt social media posed new challenges to the integrity of their brand. More than a third said that social networking sites affected brands significantly enough to bring about changes in marketing strategy.

Belief that Social Media Creates New Challenges for Protecting Brand Integrity, 2010 (% of brand representatives worldwide) Leer más “How Social Media Is Changing Brand Marketing”

How to Not Catch a Social Media Disease

In speaking to some design students, answering how I got started in the business, I told them I slept my way to the top. They didn’t fall for it but they stood silent for a good, long time. As I laughed and explained how I got started in the days before the internet, dodging velociraptors and flowing hot lava, I quickly realized they had no idea of traditional marketing techniques.

They weren’t tied to business sites as of yet, but in going over the wealth of free exposure one can easily use these days, it struck me about how I forked over thousands of dollars to source books and directories, waiting a year for them to be distributed to art directors and other practitioners during those dark days of the Inquisition. Sending postcard mailers was also the norm and art directors routinely threw away dozens each day, as opposed to now, when art directors call me and relay that I’m the only one who sends cards and they adorn their bulletin boards. How times have changed.

When I started sending e-advertisements in 1993, simple jpegs and animated gifs attached to regular e-mails, people went nuts! When I was asked what it cost, I would reply, “not a penny.” They were blown away at the possibilities. Shows you how far we have come in just a few years.

But, I always knew it was important to keep up with the cutting edge of technology and think I lost it when I got too comfortable with the ease and availability of the interface tools out there on social media sites. Drag and drop, point and click, drool a little less, etc. It’s like the guys on the bridge of the Enterprise (Star Trek) and their rapid-fire button pushing to program the computer to go forward. In reality, in the future, there will be a go and stop button with a simple joystick. Our machinery is getting smarter than we are. Just in time!


By Speider Schneider

I caught a disease from social media and I don’t know if it’s “tweetable” by modern medicine. I am fully vested in all the important social sites; LinkedIn for business, Facebook for friends, old business coworkers and a few “must know” people registered for the big time waster. I even have a fan page. I have a couple of blogs, write for some blogs that aren’t mine, I tweet, I Plaxo, Spock and other social sites I’ve long since deleted the bookmarks. I was one of the first people to discover social media. Not a pat on the back – just a testament to my ability to keep my sanity.

Sm2 in How to Not Catch a Social Media Disease
Image credit

In speaking to some design students, answering how I got started in the business, I told them I slept my way to the top. They didn’t fall for it but they stood silent for a good, long time. As I laughed and explained how I got started in the days before the internet, dodging velociraptors and flowing hot lava, I quickly realized they had no idea of traditional marketing techniques.

They weren’t tied to business sites as of yet, but in going over the wealth of free exposure one can easily use these days, it struck me about how I forked over thousands of dollars to source books and directories, waiting a year for them to be distributed to art directors and other practitioners during those dark days of the Inquisition. Sending postcard mailers was also the norm and art directors routinely threw away dozens each day, as opposed to now, when art directors call me and relay that I’m the only one who sends cards and they adorn their bulletin boards. How times have changed.

When I started sending e-advertisements in 1993, simple jpegs and animated gifs attached to regular e-mails, people went nuts! When I was asked what it cost, I would reply, “not a penny.” They were blown away at the possibilities. Shows you how far we have come in just a few years.

But, I always knew it was important to keep up with the cutting edge of technology and think I lost it when I got too comfortable with the ease and availability of the interface tools out there on social media sites. Drag and drop, point and click, drool a little less, etc. It’s like the guys on the bridge of the Enterprise (Star Trek) and their rapid-fire button pushing to program the computer to go forward. In reality, in the future, there will be a go and stop button with a simple joystick. Our machinery is getting smarter than we are. Just in time! Leer más “How to Not Catch a Social Media Disease”

The Future of Ad Agencies and Social Media

To keep up with ever-changing advertising and marketing options, ad agencies are rapidly adopting new strategies and outlooks on how consumers interact with brands. While many ad agencies have been slow to adopt social media, others have been keeping up with the trends quite well.

But keeping up with change is never good enough in this industry; the most successful, game-changing campaigns are generally a bit ahead of the curve. It’s not enough to hitch your star to an existing facet of viral content; you have to create the content yourself. And you can’t wait for mass markets to catch up to new technologies before you begin thinking about how to incorporate new tech into campaigns and creative; you need to test how that tech will work now. Mobile and social ads are no longer new; what’s more interesting now is figuring out how brands can integrate creatively and effectively with location apps and casual games.

We talked with five people who are familiar with the connected worlds of digital media and ad agencies, and here’s what they had to say about the future of social media and advertising.


Jolie O’Dell

To keep up with ever-changing advertising and marketing options, ad agencies are rapidly adopting new strategies and outlooks on how consumers interact with brands. While many ad agencies have been slow to adopt social media, others have been keeping up with the trends quite well.

But keeping up with change is never good enough in this industry; the most successful, game-changing campaigns are generally a bit ahead of the curve. It’s not enough to hitch your star to an existing facet of viral content; you have to create the content yourself. And you can’t wait for mass markets to catch up to new technologies before you begin thinking about how to incorporate new tech into campaigns and creative; you need to test how that tech will work now. Mobile and social ads are no longer new; what’s more interesting now is figuring out how brands can integrate creatively and effectively with location apps and casual games.

We talked with five people who are familiar with the connected worlds of digital media and ad agencies, and here’s what they had to say about the future of social media and advertising.


Software Is the New Medium… Leer más “The Future of Ad Agencies and Social Media”