Start your presentation with PUNCH

The primacy effect, when applied to presentations, suggests that we remember more strongly what happens at the beginning of a presentation. In order to establish a connection with an audience, we must grab their attention right from the beginning. A punchy opening that gets the audience’s attention is paramount. Granville N. Toogood, author of The Articulate Executive also stresses the idea of starting off quickly and beginning with punch. “To make sure you don’t get off on the wrong foot, plunge right in,” he says. “To galvanize the mind of the audience, you’ve got to strike quickly.” There are many ways to strike quickly and start with punch to make a strong initial connection. Conveniently, at least five proven ways to begin a talk form the acronym PUNCH. Some of the best openings include content which is Personal, Unexpected, Novel, Challenging, or Humorous. Some of the best presentations contain at least one or more of these elements.

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http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2010/10/start-your-presentation-with-punch.html

Punch The primacy effect, when applied to presentations, suggests that we remember more strongly what happens at the beginning of a presentation. In order to establish a connection with an audience, we must grab their attention right from the beginning. A punchy opening that gets the audience’s attention is paramount. Granville N. Toogood, author of The Articulate Executive also stresses the idea of starting off quickly and beginning with punch. “To make sure you don’t get off on the wrong foot, plunge right in,” he says. “To galvanize the mind of the audience, you’ve got to strike quickly.” There are many ways to strike quickly and start with punch to make a strong initial connection. Conveniently, at least five proven ways to begin a talk form the acronym PUNCH. Some of the best openings include content which is Personal, Unexpected, Novel, Challenging, or Humorous. Some of the best presentations contain at least one or more of these elements.

PERSONAL
PersonalMake it Personal. I once saw an amazing presentation on work-place safety at a company whose employees have dangerous jobs. The presenter started off his presentation with a high resolution image of some cute children. After talking about how import “our children” are (most people in the audience had children), he confessed that the children on screen were his and that his main concern in his life was being around a great long while to take of them. We all have a responsibility, he said, to our families and to each other to make sure we pay careful attention to safety procedures and rules so that no one’s children here ever have to be told that their mommy or daddy are not coming home. This opening was emotional, personal, and relevant. It got everyone’s attention and set the stage for the presentation. What could have been a presentation simply listing safety rules in bullet points to be scanned now was something far more personal.

There are many ways to make the opening personal, but personal in this case does not mean a long self-introduction about your background complete with org charts or why you are qualified to speak. However, a personal story can be very effective opening so long as it illustrates a key engaging point or sets the theme in a memorable way. Leer más “Start your presentation with PUNCH”

Why You Should Write When Life Sucks

When Ali Hale sends me a post, I know it’s going to be good. And this one – on what to do about writing when life sucks – hits the target. Feel free to let us know in the comment section what you’ve done with those “life sucks” moments and how you can use them to create emotional content that packs a punch.

This isn’t news to you: sometimes life sucks.

Maybe a bunch of things have gone wrong. Family issues. Financial hiccups. Teenage dramas. A business downturn.

Perhaps you’ve lost some of your usual energy and zest. Maybe you got too busy. Maybe you’ve had a big disappointment. Maybe you’re juggling a lot of balls at once, and you can’t let anything drop.

However it happened, you ended up here. Feeling like life sucks. Feeling tired, angry, stressed, afraid, and upset. And when you sit down to write (if you even get that far), you feel like you have nothing to say.


Written by Agent X | http://menwithpens.ca/writing-when-life-sucks

When Ali Hale sends me a post, I know it’s going to be good. And this one – on what to do about writing when life sucks – hits the target. Feel free to let us know in the comment section what you’ve done with those “life sucks” moments and how you can use them to create emotional content that packs a punch.

This isn’t news to you: sometimes life sucks.

Maybe a bunch of things have gone wrong. Family issues. Financial hiccups. Teenage dramas. A business downturn.

Perhaps you’ve lost some of your usual energy and zest. Maybe you got too busy. Maybe you’ve had a big disappointment. Maybe you’re juggling a lot of balls at once, and you can’t let anything drop.

However it happened, you ended up here. Feeling like life sucks. Feeling tired, angry, stressed, afraid, and upset. And when you sit down to write (if you even get that far), you feel like you have nothing to say.

That’s the best time to write. Leer más “Why You Should Write When Life Sucks”

Copywriting for Interactive Content

I used to sit down with my art director and hack away at ideas.

We’d spitball, land in ambiguous places, plateau, leave it for the evening, come back, and figure it out. Then I’d whip up a script, we’d board it and revise it, and there you go, you’ve got a TV spot.

At the time, it seemed simple enough: take the concept and walk the line from top level all the way down, filling in the blanks as you go. All in all, it was pretty formulaic.

“Apply idea at top level, make a brand book. Write and produce broadcast. Create outdoor and guerrilla (if possible). Go into point of sale and brand the tags on the merchandise. Done. Repeat for next product.”


I used to sit down with my art director and hack away at ideas.

We’d spitball, land in ambiguous places, plateau, leave it for the evening, come back, and figure it out.  Then I’d whip up a script, we’d board it and revise it, and there you go, you’ve got a TV spot.

At the time, it seemed simple enough: take the concept and walk the line from top level all the way down, filling in the blanks as you go.  All in all, it was pretty formulaic.

“Apply idea at top level, make a brand book. Write and produce broadcast. Create outdoor and guerrilla (if possible). Go into point of sale and brand the tags on the merchandise. Done. Repeat for next product.” Leer más “Copywriting for Interactive Content”