What to Expect From Mobile Marketing Tech in 2012

As new technologies emerge that seek to bridge the real world with the digital, the offline-to-online marketing learning curve only gets steeper.

For instance, what is the future of the QR code, and should we prepare to be wowed by augmented reality? Read on for my mobile marketing predictions of 2012.

1. Quick Response (QR) Codes

The Good: We’ll witness the disappearance of non-standard formats, an exponential rise in capable mobile devices, and a steady march toward improved calls-to-action spurred by more accountable analytics.


The Bad: Even though the arrival of native QR scanning in Android and/or iOS would be a boon for mainstream adoption, the move would elbow out increasingly popular third-party scanning apps and draw the ire of developers.


The Ugly: Overwhelmed by the variety of QR uses in marketing campaigns, bad “carpenters” keep blaming their tools, and repeat simple mistakes that disappoint many first-time consumer scanners. 


Whether you love or hate QR codes, they’ll become progressively more ubiquitous and useful as they mature from hype to marketing line item.


Matthias Galica
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Matthias Galica is CEO of ShareSquare, the leading platform among brand and entertainment marketers for incentivizing offline-to-online consumer engagement.
http://mashable.com/2012/01/11/qr-codes-augmented-reality-2012/ 

As new technologies emerge that seek to bridge the real world with the digital, the offline-to-online marketing learning curve only gets steeper.

For instance, what is the future of the QR code, and should we prepare to be wowed by augmented reality? Read on for my mobile marketing predictions of 2012.


1. Quick Response (QR) Codes


The Good: We’ll witness the disappearance of non-standard formats, an exponential rise in capable mobile devices, and a steady march toward improved calls-to-action spurred by more accountable analytics.

The Bad: Even though the arrival of native QR scanning in Android and/or iOS would be a boon for mainstream adoption, the move would elbow out increasingly popular third-party scanning apps and draw the ire of developers.

The Ugly: Overwhelmed by the variety of QR uses in marketing campaigns, bad “carpenters” keep blaming their tools, and repeat simple mistakes that disappoint many first-time consumer scanners.

Whether you love or hate QR codes, they’ll become progressively more ubiquitous and useful as they mature from hype to marketing line item.


2. Augmented Reality (AR)


The Good: Thanks to the exponential rise of capable mobile devices, a few AR campaigns will successfully break through to capture mainstream imaginations. And despite the highly proprietary nature of most AR, efforts like Aurasma‘s will continue striving to build scalable platforms.

The Bad: Similar to QR’s initial reception, the wider availability of easy AR creation tools will result in many more uninspired efforts, disappointing first-time users. The situation is further exacerbated by the broad definition of what “augmented reality” is and by uncertain consumer expectations.

The Ugly: The challenge of consistently retaining consumer attention beyond initial novelty (especially if a leading provider doesn’t emerge) threatens to relegate AR marketing to a modern flop.

In the absence of a dominant AR mobile marketing app, a plurality of contenders will fight to attain precious network effects, all the while searching for the “sticky” use cases and supporting performance metrics that result in repeat usage.


3. Near Field Communication (NFC)


The Good: Even though mobile wallets have held the spotlight, competition among providers hastens hardware penetration for mobile marketing opportunities, like the ability to swap SIM cards for NFC in lieu of upgrading one’s entire device. Early campaigns will appear in tandem with QR codes.

The Bad: Total NFC mobile penetration will remain below critical mass for mainstream deployments, constraining good campaigns to tightly focused areas, while exposing poorly conceived campaigns with less reach to critical scorn.

The Ugly: As competition escalates among mobile wallet hopefuls like Google WalletISIS, and their respectively exclusive carriers, cross-compatibility of NFC standards across mobile devices will be threatened.

The competitive landscape of mobile payments in 2012 will play a large role in either accelerating or forestalling NFC’s mobile marketing future.


4. The Field (Everybody Else)


The Good: Offline-online tech will quietly thrive, especially that which offers simplicity with mass compatibility, like Zoove’s StarStar numbers. Also, startups like ShopKick, which diligently cultivates lucrative redemption and loyalty behavior into passionate user bases, will enjoy increased participation.

The Bad: Recognition apps will continue to fetishize the technology and ignore whether the end result is any good, with the exception of Google Goggles, which will seamlessly integrate into Android’s camera (effectively making visual search opt-out).

The Ugly: Some offline-online startups will be forced to transition from enthusiastic early adopters to monetizing mainstream demand. The true nature of “checking-in” will be called into question.

QR, AR and NFC are getting all kinds of buzz, but a healthy contingent of other contenders is also vying to close the loop. Given the wide spectrum of opportunities in offline-to-online engagement, it’s not inconceivable that multiple technologies can succeed across mutually exclusive consumer behaviors.

Image courtesy of Flickrhedrinbc

Social Media Insider: CheckPoints Makes An End-Run Around Location

Consider ShopKick, for example. In a recent Q&A on MediaPost, I was willing to peg Shopkick as the most overhyped mobile technology. As Shopkick has been the subject of stories in major media outlets from here to Botswana, it’s easy to call it overhyped. The gist of the app is that you earn points by walking into select stores, which the app confirms by using the microphone to pick up an inaudible audio tone played by a speaker placed near a retailer’s entrance. More points, dubbed “kickbucks,” kick in when users take specific actions within the store such as scanning select products. Location is central to the app. The kickbucks only matter so much here, as I’ve made it to level six with over 400 kickbucks (in other words, I’ve used this app a lot) and still haven’t earned a $2 Best Buy gift card. The app is still very new and can play a role in having consumers engage with locations and products, but it’s not fully baked yet. [Más…]

Yesterday, a new location-centric application called CheckPoints was announced that’s designed to shift the framework of the experience. Instead of focusing on locations, CheckPoints works with brands, including launch partners Belkin, Energizer, Seventh Generation, and Tyson Foods. While users can check in at various shopping locations, the focus is on the apps’ featured products. Scanning those products unlocks custom content and rewards. Here, the rewards are designed to be more tangible so it doesn’t take too long to understand the benefits. Rewards can include airline miles and other offers not necessarily related to the items scanned.

Brands will be rooting for this app to work. I work with a number of consumer packaged goods brands, and I’m sure this will come up in conversation with several of them. If this app starts influencing users’ purchase decisions, especially in ways brands can readily track, then brands will promote the app themselves. In essence, it will mark a transition of slotting fees to scanning fees. It’s also worth noting that despite the differences between CheckPoints and Shopkick today, Shopkick can just as easily be used to promote products across a wide range of locations.

The limitations of product-scanning apps are numerous, and they’re worth keeping in mind. The technological hurdles will be overcome within several years, but consumer behavior may not change as fast.


//www.marketersstudio.com | by David Berkowitz, Senior Director of Emerging Media & Innovation for agency 360i.


Today’s column, which originally ran in MediaPost

Checkpoints1

I’ve got a riddle for you: What’s the hardest part about location-based marketing? Here’s a hint: It’s not the marketing.

The challenge tends to lie in dealing with locations. This comes up all the time. Can locations accept mobile coupons? Does a brand have the right to run marketing around locations they don’t own? For locations that are part of a chain, is the marketing the responsibility of the store owner or the corporate marketing group? While locations now offer compelling digital marketing opportunities thanks to advances in mobile media and devices, locations also cause a few wrinkles in some otherwise solid marketing plans.

Consider ShopKick, for example. In a recent Q&A on MediaPost, I was willing to peg Shopkick as the most overhyped mobile technology. As Shopkick has been the subject of stories in major media outlets from here to Botswana, it’s easy to call it overhyped. The gist of the app is that you earn points by walking into select stores, which the app confirms by using the microphone to pick up an inaudible audio tone played by a speaker placed near a retailer‘s entrance. More points, dubbed “kickbucks,” kick in when users take specific actions within the store such as scanning select products. Location is central to the app. The kickbucks only matter so much here, as I’ve made it to level six with over 400 kickbucks (in other words, I’ve used this app a lot) and still haven’t earned a $2 Best Buy gift card. The app is still very new and can play a role in having consumers engage with locations and products, but it’s not fully baked yet. Leer más “Social Media Insider: CheckPoints Makes An End-Run Around Location”