10 Top Trends in Social Media | by Jeff Bullas


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I visited Italy recently and as we know the Italians are a very stylish bunch. They seem to know what fashion is really about.10 Top Trends in Social Media

They can wear a scarf with fabulous flair, choose the cool hat that sets off the outfit or select a pair of sexy shoes that make them look like a fashion model and that is just the men!

The Italians have taken “style” to a level that the rest of the world can only aspire to.

Trends in Shoes

Now on the topic of shoes it appears that there is a trend that if it doesn’t stop very soon, it is going to lead to many injuries and even possible death as fashionista women fall from great heights after stumbling in their 30 centimeter high heels!

This will lend a whole new meaning to the term “Fashion Tragics“.

I have to admit though that the shoes in the windows of the fashion brand stores of Rome and Florence were not just fashion items but objects of style, art and creativity. Just not very comfortable or sensible to wear but who said that fashion should be sensible.

The Trends in Social Media

My trip to Italy was not just for looking at shoes but to provide four keynote presentations to the BE-Wizard web conference.

One of these topics was on the “Top 10 Trends in Social  Media” and how business can adapt and use these trends to their commercial advantage.

Social media that was initially seen as a fad 2-3 years ago is now firmly embedded in the fabric of the web and is impacting how business markets, communicates and publishes.

Trend #1  Social Mobile

The first trend we looked at was the the rise of the social mobile. The synergy of mobile and social networks is combining to make us addicted to our socially networked enabled smart phones that allow us to view our Facebook or Twitter account anywhere at anytime.

The numbers

  • Current research puts the number of mobiles at north of 5.5 billion devices
  • 1,2 billion have internet connected phones (smart phones)
  • 425 million users use their mobile to check in to Facebook
  • 55% of Twitter traffic is from the mobile
  • 400 million YouTube views are from mobile devices

The implications

  • Huge growth potential
  • Create content for mobile devices
  • Design and develop websites and blogs for mobile viewing
  • Make it easy for viewers to act on that mobile content in a social manner (sharing)

In essence make it easy for people to buy and share your products and services from your mobile phones.

Trend #2 Socialization of Search

Google has realized that social networks are here to stay and consequently invested over half a billion dollars in designing and developing Google+ which they launched in June of 2011.

They have realized that in the battle to stay relevant, social networks need to be prioritized when producing search results.

Google considers social as “core” to its strategy and is using the capture of social signals when delivering information from search engines. Consequently you will see the top social networks appearing high in search results pages.

Also it is embedding Google+ into all its web properties including YouTube and Picassa.

Hence the introduction of the “+1″ button in 2011.

The implications Leer más “10 Top Trends in Social Media | by Jeff Bullas”

Turning a Minor Innovation into a Major Innovation

John Sipe worked in an abattoir in the US in the 1920s. Like other workers there he found that he kept slipping on the wet and bloody floors. His shoes were too slippery, so he took his knife and cut thin slits across the rubber soles. He found that the shoes now gave a much better grip. In 1923 he took out a patent on the process and called it Siping with the slits called Sipes. He thought it could improve the grips of car tyres and he was right but unfortunately for him Siping was not adopted by the motor industry until the 1950s when superior tread compounds were developed that could stand up to the process.


How a Minor Innovation in One Field Can Become a Major Innovation in Another

by Paul Sloane

Turning a Minor Innovation into a Major InnovationOr, how a small idea for shoes became a big idea for cars.

Often a minor innovation in one field can become a major innovation in another field. An example is Siping.

John Sipe worked in an abattoir in the US in the 1920s. Like other workers there he found that he kept slipping on the wet and bloody floors. His shoes were too slippery, so he took his knife and cut thin slits across the rubber soles. He found that the shoes now gave a much better grip. In 1923 he took out a patent on the process and called it Siping with the slits called Sipes. He thought it could improve the grips of car tyres and he was right but unfortunately for him Siping was not adopted by the motor industry until the 1950s when superior tread compounds were developed that could stand up to the process.

On roads covered with snow, ice or water Sipes in tires significantly improve traction. A 1978 study by the US National Safety Council found that on ice Siping improved stopping distances by 22 % and rolling traction by 28%. Leer más “Turning a Minor Innovation into a Major Innovation”

Nike files patent app for self-lacing shoes, Doc Brown not listed as an inventor

The patent app was filed on February 11, 2009 and is listed as a continuation in part of application filed on May 2, 2008. All I know is it’s about time some of the cool tech from the movies of my childhood finally came to be. All of the electronics needed for the shoe is in the sole. The design looks much better than that DIY hack I mentioned for self-lacing Nike’s a while back.


I really wanted three things from the movie Back to the Future II. I wanted that DeLorean, the hover board, and those Nike shoes that laced themselves. Decades later, I still have none of the three. Nike has filed a patent app that may finally put those sweet shoes on my feet.

nikepatent sg

Apparently, some of the people from the Nike Innovative Kitchen have filed a patent app for a self-lacing shoes like that pair from the flick. The shoe in the patent app even appears to have the same design. Along with the “automatic fastening system”, the shoes also have a lighting system. Leer más “Nike files patent app for self-lacing shoes, Doc Brown not listed as an inventor”

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Why Crocs Wants Consumers to ‘Feel the Love’


– Elena Malykhina
Crocs is on a mission to show consumers the “soul” and “foot-loving sole” of its shoes. The brand, which is known for clog-like designs, on March 29 debuted a new campaign—Crocs’ first integrated marketing effort centered on a single message, said vp of marketing Ken Chaplin. That message (and the campaign’s theme) is “Feel the Love,” and it focuses on a proprietary technology called Croslite, which is built into every Crocs shoe. The campaign, created by the band‘s new lead agency Cramer-Krasselt/Chicago, is now rolling out in the U.S. and Europe. It spans TV and print (books such as Real Simple and InStyle), out-of-home, POP, and includes a major social media/digital component. In an interview with Brandweek, Chaplin disucssed the Crocs global effort, why “love” is the central theme, and what his favorite Crocs shoe is. Excerpts are below:

Brandweek: How did you come up with the campaign’s theme, “Feel the Love”? What’s the message behind it?
Ken Chaplin:
“Feel the Love” made sense on a number of levels, but first and foremost because of our proprietary Croslite technology—the soft, cushiony, foot-loving material in every pair of Crocs. This technology is what sets our shoes apart from any other in the casual footwear market. We make shoes that love you back, and people are passionate about our footwear because of this.

BW: And what about the animated Croslite characters? What do they represent?
KC:
The adorable Croslite characters at the heart of the campaign personify the proprietary technology that serves as the “soul” and sole of every pair of Crocs shoes. Croslites represent the heritage of our brand while encouraging people to take a fresh look at our new styles and discover that Crocs offers more than “one shoe.”

BW: Are you targeting any specific age group?
KC:
We aren’t defining our target by age or demographics, but rather by a mindset. Our core audience is people who are comfortable with themselves. They are adventurous and spirited. They are people who get more out of life and are always willing to try something new. The inherent self-confidence of this group allows them to appreciate the quirkiness of Crocs and enjoy Crocs for what they really are—a fun, comfortable shoe.

BW: You’ve been quoted saying that the campaign’s goal is to reinforce what the Crocs brand stands for. What is that exactly?
KC:
Crocs rapidly became a global footwear sensation and to date we’ve sold more than 120 million pairs of shoes. But we want to fully establish Crocs as brand and not simply one shoe style. Crocs is a lifestyle footwear brand that brings profound comfort, innovation and fun to the world’s feet. Our shoes are comfortable for a reason and the comfort from our Classic style can be found in everything we do. The campaign encourages consumers to take another look at Crocs. Our Classic collection is still a viable and important part of our product mix and this campaign builds on that to show people that there’s more to love.

BW: Social networks have become an important channel for marketers. Are you doing anything on social nets like Facebook or Twitter for this campaign?
KC:
Absolutely—we are fortunate to have a very devoted and passionate base of customers online. In the coming months, we will be launching key programs across social media platforms that deepen our fan engagement and provide avenues in which they can “share the love” with others.

BW: How is this effort similar or different compared to others you’ve done in the past?
KC:
Historically we’ve focused the majority of our efforts around experiential and event-based marketing. This approach served the brand well in our early years. Sponsorships helped us establish our brand and drive word of mouth. As we develop as a brand and work to grow top-line revenue, we need to expand our reach. This campaign represents Crocs’ first integrated marketing effort around a single message—“Feel the Love”—with worldwide execution. The “Feel the Love” campaign is fully integrated across all consumer touch points with the intention of reaching a target consumer we feel represents the core of our business, ultimately driving the sales and increased brand awareness for Crocs.

BW: Do you have favorite Crocs shoes?
KC:
Santa Cruz. The shoe has all the comfort of the Classic with a Croslite footbed and a variety of canvas uppers that can be worn all day in any number of settings.

http://www.brandweek.com/bw/content_display/news-and-features/direct/e3i309cdb262cc7125e6afdae0c38e5a7fb

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