Gripe aviar en China – gracias @elmundosalud


 

La Comisión Nacional de Salud y Planificación Familiar de China (NHFPC) ha confirmado este lunes otros cuatro casos de gripe aviar, lo que eleva a 24 el número de contagiados por el virus H7N9, mientras que el balance de fallecidos se encuentra en siete personas.

Shangai es la ciudad más afectada por el brote de gripe aviar, ya que, del total de casos, 11 se han detectado allí, cinco de los cuales han acabado en muerte.

Del resto, ocho han sido localizados en Jiangsu, tres en Zhejiang –incluidos dos fallecimientos– y dos en Anhui, según ha informado la agencia de noticias Xinhua.

El Gobierno chino ha informado de que los análisis clínicos han reveladocoincidencias significativas entre el virus H7N9 que ha desatado el brote y las muestras recogidas de las palomas que estaban a la venta en un mercado avícola del distrito de Songjiang, en Shangai.

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Nadar en el cielo


Parte de la piscina cubierta, que se posa encima del hotel de 24 hoteles, sobresale del edificio principal y está suspendida en el aire a 100 metros de altura. Su piso está hecho de vidrio fortalecido.
Esto les da a los huéspedes la sensación delirante de nadar en el cielo; pueden ver la calle abajo mientras que los peatones en Xiuyan Lu pueden ver a los bañistas arriba.
“Sentí como si nadara en el cielo. También pude disfrutar de un bello paisaje de Pudong desde aquí… fue algo genial y maravilloso”, le dijo un huésped a CCTV.
“Quisimos proporcionarles a los huéspedes una experiencia única en la piscina, y dejarles sentir que están de vacaciones incluso en medio de una ciudad bulliciosa”, dijo un representante del grupo InterContinental Hotels, compañía matriz de Holiday Inn.
Cuando no están nadando, los huéspedes pueden disfrutar del paisaje urbano de Pudong hasta el distrito financiero de Lujiazui en el lounge de la piscina.
La primera de su tipo en China Leer más “Nadar en el cielo”

Top 50 Ranking of China’s Business Leaders Exposes Common Myths


by Xiaowei Rose Luo, Morten T. Hansen, Herminia Ibarra, and Urs Peyer  |  http://blogs.hbr.org

“A general who fears to unsheathe his sword is not a good general,” says Mr. Li Jiaxiang, Chairman of Air China from 2004 to 2008 and the #1 performing corporate leader in China according to our new ranking (just published in the Harvard Business Review China and the centerpiece for the magazine’s launch events in Beijing and Shanghai). Under his leadership, the company’s total shareholder return outperformed its industry peers by 1,022%, corresponding to a compound annual return above the industry average of 129%, with a corresponding market capitalization increase of CNY 237 bn (USD 36.7 bn). A former general in the China Air Force, Mr. Li put into practice leadership skills he honed in his military career.

Though ours is not the first ranking of Chinese business leaders, it is the first ever such ranking to rely on objective long-term stock market performance. Leer más “Top 50 Ranking of China’s Business Leaders Exposes Common Myths”

In case you missed them, see which articles have been most popular with our readers in the first quarter of this year.


McKinsey Quarterly
mckinseyquarterly.com

Read them today and join the conversation.

How leaders kill meaning at work art 1. GOVERNANCE
How leaders kill meaning at work
Senior executives routinely undermine creativity, productivity, and commitment by damaging the inner work lives of their employees in four avoidable ways.
The executive's guide to better listening art 2. GOVERNANCE
The executive’s guide to better listening
Strong listening skills can make a critical difference in the performance of senior executives, but few are able to cultivate them. Here’s how.
A CEO's guide to innovation in China 3. STRATEGY
A CEO’s guide to innovation in China
Dynamic domestic players and focused multinationals are helping China churn out a growing number of innovative products and services. Intensifying competition lies ahead; here’s a road map for navigating it.

Leer más “In case you missed them, see which articles have been most popular with our readers in the first quarter of this year.”

PepsiCo hands US$27m media duties to PHD in Australia

The account win covers all PepsiCo brands in Australia, including Pepsi, Pepsi Max, Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Smith’s, Doritos, Red Rock Deli, Grain Waves and Sekata.

The appointment, which ousts incumbent Eighty K’s, sees the OMG agency take charge of the media planning and buying for PepsiCo’s brand portfolio from 1 September. [Más…]

Bellamy Hayden remains the media strategist for all PepsiCo brands.

OMD Shanghai won PepsiCo’s media business reportedly worth US$220 million in China towards the end of last year. OMD beat incumbent Mindshare after MEC withdrew during the last round of the pitch.


PepsiCo
Image via Wikipedia

SYDNEY – PepsiCo has appointed PHD to handle its media planning and buying duties in Australia, following a pitch that reportedly also involved Mindshare.

PHD scoops PepsiCo’s media business in Australia.

The business is reportedly worth US$27 million.

The account win covers all PepsiCo brands in Australia, including Pepsi, Pepsi Max, Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Smith’s, Doritos, Red Rock Deli, Grain Waves and Sekata.

The appointment, which ousts incumbent Eighty K’s, sees the OMG agency take charge of the media planning and buying for PepsiCo’s brand portfolio from 1 September. Leer más “PepsiCo hands US$27m media duties to PHD in Australia”

3 Valuable Infographics For Marketers In China


National emblem of the People's Republic of China
Image via Wikipedia

As of 2008, there are about 1.4 billion people in China; that’s about one in five persons living on the face of the Earth. In Shanghai alone, there are more than 17 million people – that’s more than those that live in the U.S. cities of New York, Los Angeles and Chicago combined. On top of being the most populous country in the world, they also boast the third largest economy in the world after the United States and Japan with a normal GDP of US$4.91 trillion in 2009.

From the looks of it, their global dominance is inevitable if not for a few problems that are still unresolved. For example, their environment is seriously polluted which in turn threatens their food production. On top of that, social unrest is the toughest problem that’s still unresolved; 400% income gap between urban Chinese and those residing in the countryside anyone?

Here are 3 infographics showing the different aspects of China for potential marketers that wish to expand or start their business there.

The Numbers Behind China

the numbers of china Leer más “3 Valuable Infographics For Marketers In China”

5 things you need to know about Shanghai Expo marketing


debbycheung

This article is republished with express permission of Media Asia, which originally published it on April 1, 2010.

Debby Cheung, group managing director of Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide/China, shares her insight on the highly anticipated, six month extravaganza known as World Expo 2010 Shanghai, and gives advice on how marketers can make the most of this monumental opportunity.

1. Bring your A game.

192 countries and 50 organisations will take part in the Shanghai Expo – not to mention the brands that will jockey for position with guerilla marketing. Competition for media and consumer attention will be fierce, and the battle will play out both on the ground and online. All involved in the Expo will be scrambling to reach out to consumers to reinforce the faces and personalities of their brands. To be heard, brands will need to pull out all the stops and create bold, determined, decisive and cross-discipline strategies. There will be no room for the faint or half-hearted.

2. Prolong the hype.

The Olympics comprise of 16 days of intense and enthusiastic campaigns that are more easily sustained due to the short duration of the event; but Expo is a whole different animal. This event spans six months, making sustained hype key to the success of campaigns. Without recurring, innovative and ever-changing infusions of activities, campaigns will get lost in the crowd.

3. Non-sponsors get on the bus by thinking green.

The theme, ‘Better City, Better Life’ means that anything sustainable and environmentally friendly is your ticket to an association with the Expo. Sponsors are not the only ones who can leverage this event – all brands should be thinking green to piggyback on the Expo theme. Moreover, the Shanghai government, Expo and organisations will continually look for new partnership opportunities so non-sponsors will have plenty of chances to take part. With 20,000 events in Shanghai, both on and off the Expo site, opportunities to contribute to the green theme are endless.

4. Think beyond Shanghai.

This Expo is expected to generate the largest number of visitors in the history of the event, and only 5 per cent of them will be from outside China. Domestic visitors are estimated at 70 million, with 75 per cent of them coming from second and third tier cities. As Shanghai is simply not equipped to accommodate so many visitors, the government has already secured the support of surrounding cities to help accommodate the overflow. As a result, effective marketing campaign strategies need to think beyond the borders of the already overcrowded and extraordinarily competitive Shanghai market.

5. Expo goes mobile.

3G and the connectivity of Blackberry phones and mobile devices mean visitors will be constantly on the lookout for the best and most interesting places to go and both positive and negative reports will travel at the speed of light. When mapping out Expo strategies, marketers need to capitalise on these channels and not shy away from them. The sheer size of the Expo will make targeting the right audience with traditional marketing a challenge, but mobile and online strategies will level the playing field.

http://www.asiadigitalmap.com/

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