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Holiday Internet Marketing: Bring Joy to Your Q4

Once again we’re in make-or-break Q4—the time of year businesses worldwide prep (and hope) for a flood of holiday business. The time of year that can determine the difference between a going concern and concern whether you can keep going. Be it crafting a quality, attention-grabbing email campaign or optimizing a mobile marketing strategy, this […]

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The Dos and Don’ts for Google’s New Disavow Links Tool

For the first time in what might be ever, Google has followed Bing’s lead and announced a tool to disavow links. We asked (or demanded), and they listened! Cleverly named the Disavow Links tool, Google Webmaster Tools’ latest feature gives power back to webmasters and takes it away from spammers. Here are our tips for […]

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Steal This Product Listing Ads Dashboard Before Wednesday

If you’ve followed my blog musings in the last year or so at Portent, you’ll know that I’m a bit of a dashboard nut. My Perfect Google Analytics Dashboard post took off in ways I never imagined. (Thanks guys!) But here’s the thing: I was lying to you all – or misleading you, anyway. There […]

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Google AuthorRank: Heir to the Throne

A bold ruler ascends—going by the name Google AuthorRank – and his reign will be a long one. Because, in the very near future, information will take a back seat to who supplies it. We can no longer trust content – there’s just too much of it.  And many of “the facts” are flat-out wrong.  […]

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Facebook political update: Debates, spam and a polling slam

This post is part of a series on social media, Facebook data and the 2012 Presidential election. It updates Portent’s initial research. You can read the original report here. This year’s presidential race continues to be a great marketing study: The niche brand with a universe problem versus the hesitant big brand. After the debate […]

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Optimize Your New LinkedIn Company Page in 7 Steps

LinkedIn has finally rolled out the new company pages to everyone. Along with a bunch of little changes, there are a few major ones: The redesign itself, cover images, and the fact that company pages are now visible through the LinkedIn mobile and iPad apps. These hip new LinkedIn company pages are sort of like […]

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Google penalizará a las páginas que usen “demasiadas” técnicas de posicionamiento o SEO

La mayoría de los buscadores van cambiando sus normas y prácticas para establecer un orden en los resultados. Y la mayoría de gestores de contenidos web se esfuerzan por encontrar el equilibrio perfecto de palabras clave y enlaces internos para ayudar a sus sitios a tener un buen posicionamiento en Google, Yahoo y otros. Pero ahora Google planea penalizar a los sitios web que van demasiado lejos para optimizar su contenido.


20minutos.es

Incompresible acción de google.

  • El buscador quiere “tratar de nivelar el terreno de juego un poco”.
    Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...
  • Google castigará con bajadas en el orden de los resultados a los sitios web que pongan demasiadas palabras clave o a los que contengan demasiados enlaces”.

El buscador Google está planeando castigar a cualquier sitio web que se encuentre “demasiado optimizado” mediante técnicas de Search Engine Optimization (SEO), según ha declarado el director del equipo de Google de spam web, Matt Cutts. Leer más “Google penalizará a las páginas que usen “demasiadas” técnicas de posicionamiento o SEO”

Foursquare Launches “Personalized Search For The Real World”

Foursquare is introducing what it calls “personalized search for the real world” on its recently redesigned website. What that means as a practical matter is the introduction of the “Explore” feature, better keyword search and several new filters that enable users to drill down in search results. We can now, without hesitation, now call Foursquare a “local search engine.”

You’ll now see an Explore button or tab in the upper right on the website. It’s obviously been on the mobile app for some time but not on the site until today. Because I was so used to seeing Explore on the mobile client I didn’t remember it wasn’t previously available on the website until Foursquare pointed that fact out.


http://searchengineland.com/foursquare-launches-personalized-search-for-the-real-world-107500
by

Foursquare is introducing what it calls “personalized search for the real world” on its recently redesigned website. What that means as a practical matter is the introduction of the “Explore” feature, better keyword search and several new filters that enable users to drill down in search results. We can now, without hesitation, now call Foursquare a “local search engine.”

You’ll now see an Explore button or tab in the upper right on the website. It’s obviously been on the mobile app for some time but not on the site until today. Because I was so used to seeing Explore on the mobile client I didn’t remember it wasn’t previously available on the website until Foursquare pointed that fact out.

Leer más “Foursquare Launches “Personalized Search For The Real World””

Texas Attorney General Investigates Google Search

For instance, the Department of Justice has asked for more information to review Google’s proposed acquisition of ITA, the flight information company. The government will look at issues of search fairness as part of that inquiry.

The Texas attorney general has asked Google for more information on several companies, Google said. They include Foundem, a British shopping comparison site, SourceTool, a business search directory and myTriggers, which collects shopping links.

In the Google blog post, Mr. Harrison drew an association to Microsoft. He said that Microsoft funds Foundem’s backer and that its antitrust attorneys represent the other two.

Foundem is a member of the Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace, a European group co-founded and sponsored by Microsoft. SourceTool and myTriggers are clients of Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, the law firm that represents Microsoft on antitrust issues.


By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Google said Friday that the Texas Attorney General, Greg Abbott, is conducting an antitrust review of its search business.

The examination involves the fairness of Google search results, a concept called search neutrality. Some companies worry Google has the power to discriminate against them by lowering their links in search results or charging higher fees for their paid search ads.

In a company blog post, Don Harrison, Google’s deputy general counsel, said that the company’s priority is to “provide the most useful, relevant search results and ads for users.”

“Given that not every Web site can be at the top of the results, or even appear on the first page of our results, it’s unsurprising that some less relevant, lower quality websites will be unhappy with their ranking,” Mr. Harrison wrote. Leer más “Texas Attorney General Investigates Google Search”

Calculate Taxi Cab Fares With Bing Maps

Thanks to a new app, Bing Maps now calculates the cab fare on a route between two points.

The Taxi Fare Calculator was developed by Ricky Brundritt as a submission to the King of Bing Maps competition.

The app is available at the Bing Maps website right now. Just pick a region (results are best within a major metropolitan area, such as New York or London) and type in two addresses. The app gives the shortest route and a fare estimate based on normal rates for cabs in the area. The pick-up charge, time charges and by-the-mile costs are all factored in where applicable.

This tool should prove helpful to users who want to save some cash by comparing routes or who need to make sure they have the money on hand for a trip they intend to take.

Taxi Fare Calculator is one of many apps being considered for Microsoft’s King of Bing Maps title. The winner will soon be selected by a panel that includes CNET’s Josh Lowensohn, Search Engine Land’s Greg Sterling and Directions’ Joe Francica. Expect the announcement to show up on the Bing blog August 20.


Thanks to a new app, Bing Maps now calculates the cab fare on a route between two points.

The Taxi Fare Calculator was developed by Ricky Brundritt as a submission to the King of Bing Maps competition.

The app is available at the Bing Maps website right now. Just pick a region (results are best within a major metropolitan area, such as New York or London) and type in two addresses. The app gives the shortest route and a fare estimate based on normal rates for cabs in the area. The pick-up charge, time charges and by-the-mile costs are all factored in where applicable.

This tool should prove helpful to users who want to save some cash by comparing routes or who need to make sure they have the money on hand for a trip they intend to take.

Taxi Fare Calculator is one of many apps being considered for Microsoft’s King of Bing Maps title. The winner will soon be selected by a panel that includes CNET’s Josh Lowensohn, Search Engine Land’s Greg Sterling and Directions’ Joe Francica. Expect the announcement to show up on the Bing blog August 20. Leer más “Calculate Taxi Cab Fares With Bing Maps”

How do you get people to care about privacy?

From today’s MediaPost Social Media Insider

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How do you get people to care about privacy?

People care about it in offline settings. At home, you know which window shades you prefer to draw closed at which times. At work, you might discuss Saturday night’s exploits with your cubicle-mate and not with your boss. Few can tell online; I can’t. I avoid networks like blippy that share purchases based on credit card data, and I turned off Google Latitude’s option of automatically broadcasting my location from mobile devices, but I’m admittedly inconsistent and too laissez-faire with most other forms of social media.

The latest debates over Facebook’s privacy policies may not last, but there’s a lot of good coming out of the dialogue. If Facebook won’t clearly explain how it publicizes consumers’ information, others are trying to fill the void. Most resources have the echo-chamber effect, only reaching people who care about privacy and social media to begin with. But if enough of these echoes escape and start ricocheting around the water coolers where more Facebook users hang out, then there’s a chance to bring the discussion to people who wouldn’t intentionally look for it.

Let’s look at several attempts to raise awareness about these privacy issues, and how likely they’ll break through the echo chamber:

Matt McKeon’s The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook (via All Facebook)

I keep returning to these illustrations of how Facebook’s default privacy settings have changed over the years. In 2005, userswould share some profile info with friends and their networks. By 2007, basic information was shared with all Facebook users. Now, the default settings allow almost all information to be shared with the entire Internet.

I’ve spent far longer studying the diagrams here than the text, and it’s striking going back and forth between the 2005 and 2010 images. If you’ve seen anything this clear in mainstream media, please share it in the comments, as these infographics are screaming for more exposure.

ReclaimPrivacy.org (via Anthony Haney on Facebook)

Using a bookmarklet you can drag to your browser’s bookmarks, log into Facebook and the link will tell you how secure your privacy settings are. As I continue to violate best practices for maintaining privacy, you can see a screen shot of ReclaimPrivacy’s review of my own settings. Somehow I managed to block all known applications that could leak my personal information, which must have been a fluke. All of my other settings are rated “caution” or “insecure.”

The best part of the tool is that it fixes some of your settings for you. Yet will you really trust a random tool more than Facebook? OK, maybe. Beyond coming from a largely unknown source, the bookmarklet approach will turn off more novice Internet users. It does work, though.

Openbook (via Danny Sullivan at Search Engine Land and MediaPost)

What if you could shame people into changing their privacy settings? Openbook searches public status updates for potentially questionable phrases people may share on Facebook. I’ve linked directly to one of the tamer ones, but if you clear the search field and search for something random, what comes up may not fly on network television. Many of the status updates are harmless, but some could be damaging. Searching the phrase “don’t tell anyone,” someone noted how she’s playing hooky from her job, and her profile page says what school district she works for. That won’t help her case for tenure if her district faces budget cuts this year.

I’m not sure how many people will see this, but using live examples of real people makes it easy to relate to them, and if you don’t change your settings because of it, you may well think twice about what you post on Facebook.

Diaspora

Tired of changing your settings? Are you one of ten people who left Facebook in the past month and now have your picture in a major national newspaper as the sign of a trend? Then do I have the network for you! Join Diaspora, “the privacy aware, personally controlled, do-it-all distributed open source social network.” If that’s not the tagline for the next 500 million-user social network, I don’t know what is. About 5,000 chipped in nearly $200,000 to make this project happen, well above the $10,000 goal. Aiming low has its perks.

Sorry, but I don’t know how that anti-Facebook angst translates into a Facebook rival. People weren’t looking to leave Six Degrees or Friendster or MySpace; they just kept finding something better and brought more of their friends. There are limits to that scale, so soon enough investors will seek social networks for nematodes or bacteria just to hit growth projections.

I’m not convinced any of these approaches are enough, and the privacy issue is hardly unique to social media. I know my bank has had digital security breaches, but I keep my money there, even if I change my password every so often. There are marketing services firms focused on direct mail and other channels that will probably collect far more data than Facebook ever will.

Facebook gets more attention, though, because it’s new, it’s massive, and we have more control over it than we’re used to. We can do something about it. It’s the monster under the bed we can overcome by shining a flashlight down below and realizing we have nothing to fear.

Yet sometimes it’s more fun to stay on the bed, worry ourselves to sleep, and wait until the morning comes, when we know for sure there’s no monster that can hurt us.


From today’s MediaPost Social Media Insider

4617591602_ed2cd9ded4_b

How do you get people to care about privacy?

People care about it in offline settings. At home, you know which window shades you prefer to draw closed at which times. At work, you might discuss Saturday night’s exploits with your cubicle-mate and not with your boss. Few can tell online; I can’t. I avoid networks like blippy that share purchases based on credit card data, and I turned off Google Latitude‘s option of automatically broadcasting my location from mobile devices, but I’m admittedly inconsistent and too laissez-faire with most other forms of social media. Leer más “How do you get people to care about privacy?”

Facebook Finding More Ways to Compete with Google

Google has its fair share of competition from a variety of angles. Apple is getting a great deal of the attention in this regard (making two big moves yesterday), but Facebook is up there as well. Facebook is already a key competitor in terms of where people spend their time online. Facebook expanding its presence all over the web only increases that, and will likely play a big role in the diversification of how people obtain information – in other words, maybe a little less Googling. Some of us have even speculated on the possibility that Facebook could one day create it’s own AdSense-like network.


Google Analytics: SML Pro Blog Traffic Sources...
Image by See-ming Lee 李思明 SML via Flickr

How Big is This Facebook Thing Going to Get?
By Chris Crum

Apparently Facebook is not content with only taking over the web, but wants to get some penetration into the physical world as well. Taking a cue from another dominant company, Google, Facebook is now giving brick and mortar businesses decals to put in their windows. While Facebook tells WebProNews the decals are currently only a test with a small number of businesses, I would expect this to be expanded in the future.


Is Facebook a worthy competitor to Google?

Increasing Competition with GoogleLeer más “Facebook Finding More Ways to Compete with Google”