Extraordinary Hyperrealist Sculptures Photography

In a sense they are a healthy riposte to the human detritus portrayed by Duane Hanson but these are executive toys writ large that play host to the kitsch requirements of many a public commission-a more credible school of Franklin Mint. Here, where there are certain mucky Mueck moments, instead of tiny things made huge, these big guys look like tiny heroes made into paperweights.

They don’t carry the cultural weight of some of Jeff Koon’s iconic subjects but veer towards the banal- are these guys heroes ? Or a post-Warholian marketing man’s idea of contemporary branding that plays on gay iconography? There is an inherent vulnerability in all of the subjects-for all the uniform Men’s Health muscle, there is an undercurrent of fallibility, doubt, uncertainty, even failure floating before their eyes. There is bathos, Pathos and well… loss. What else do these figures have to say? Probably, like most sportsmen, very little but the artistry is undeniable.


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Writen by Alexandru

Staticity, the snapshot-where the photograph replicates death or at least a nanosecond of life is rarely captured in sculpture where, usually (except for the bronze tonnage of many a public artwork) the artist strives to capture the energy and movement. It is ironic therefore that this display of work could be the start of a non-movement movement owing more to the stillness of photography than the unbridled energy of say, Umberto Boccioni.

There is of course a direct link to one of the greatest works of art, that of DegasLa Petite Danseuse de Quatorze Ans (or Little Ballerina) but these are real people photographed to look like hyperrealist sculptures.

In a sense they are a healthy riposte to the human detritus portrayed by Duane Hanson but these are executive toys writ large that play host to the kitsch requirements of many a public commission-a more credible school of Franklin Mint. Here, where there are certain mucky Mueck moments, instead of tiny things made huge, these big guys look like tiny heroes made into paperweights.

They don’t carry the cultural weight of some of Jeff Koon’s iconic subjects but veer towards the banal- are these guys heroes ? Or a post-Warholian marketing man’s idea of contemporary branding that plays on gay iconography? There is an inherent vulnerability in all of the subjects-for all the uniform Men’s Health muscle, there is an undercurrent of fallibility, doubt, uncertainty, even failure floating before their eyes. There is bathos, Pathos and well… loss. What else do these figures have to say? Probably, like most sportsmen, very little but the artistry is undeniable.

So what are we to make of these figures? They are so shiny one could lick them and yet they can’t work as sculpture because you can’t walk around them. Having used hours of artifice to create these tableaux, the photographers have flattened and ‘killed’ them-this is where they start to look like a ‘brand’ this is where the viewers’ eyes are presented with the advertising art director’s idea of realism-up close and personal.

Author : DIVER AND AGUILAR


 

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Are You Ambitious Enough?

Admit it: you’re ambitious.

Don’t worry, I’m not going to ask you to proclaim your ambitions in the comments. But if you read the 99% and use the Behance Network, you’re here because you want to learn, you want to improve your professional skills, you want to keep your finger on the pulse of the creative industries. You want to compare your work with that of your peers and emulate the success of your heroes. You want to succeed.But it’s not really the done thing to say so, is it?

These days, “ambition” is a dirty word. People who are “ambitious” are viewed as either selfish or unrealistic. (“That sounds a bit ambitious” is code for “you are going to fail.”) Yet it wasn’t always this way. The poet James Fenton points out that 500 years ago in Renaissance Florence, artists had no qualms about admitting their ambitions. Here’s Fenton discussing Giorgio Vasari’s biography of Andrea del Verrocchio:

I take these stories about artists, from Baldinucci and Vasari, because they date from a period when it appears that one could acknowledge straightforwardly motives of which we would today be obscurely ashamed. Verocchio observes that there is much to be gained in the field of sculpture, so he becomes a sculptor, and when he feels he has won the honour that is going, he turns to painting with the same motive, but when he sees his way blocked by Leonardo he turns back to sculpture again.


by Mark McGuinness

Admit it: you’re ambitious.

Don’t worry, I’m not going to ask you to proclaim your ambitions in the comments. But if you read the 99% and use the Behance Network, you’re here because you want to learn, you want to improve your professional skills, you want to keep your finger on the pulse of the creative industries. You want to compare your work with that of your peers and emulate the success of your heroes. You want to succeed.But it’s not really the done thing to say so, is it?

These days, “ambition” is a dirty word. People who are “ambitious” are viewed as either selfish or unrealistic. (“That sounds a bit ambitious” is code for “you are going to fail.”) Yet it wasn’t always this way. The poet James Fenton points out that 500 years ago in Renaissance Florence, artists had no qualms about admitting their ambitions. Here’s Fenton discussing Giorgio Vasari‘s biography of Andrea del Verrocchio:

I take these stories about artists, from Baldinucci and Vasari, because they date from a period when it appears that one could acknowledge straightforwardly motives of which we would today be obscurely ashamed. Verocchio observes that there is much to be gained in the field of sculpture, so he becomes a sculptor, and when he feels he has won the honour that is going, he turns to painting with the same motive, but when he sees his way blocked by Leonardo he turns back to sculpture again. Leer más “Are You Ambitious Enough?”

40 Terrific Works of Art Made From Common Trash

We’ve all heard that “one man’s trash is another mans treasure”. That saying takes on new meaning when we view the world through the eyes of the artists featured in todays post. These talented individuals see possibility in the things we throw away every day. Instead of heading to the art supply store they just collect common trash and turn it into works of amazing art. Take a look at these 40 terrific works of art made from common trash and be prepared to start looking at your garbage in a whole new way.
Artworks Made From Trash

Ann P. Smith
This awesome owl and bird sculpture was made from reclaimed electronic trash. It reminds me of the mechanical owl in The Clash of the Titans.


We’ve all heard that “one man’s trash is another mans treasure”. That saying takes on new meaning when we view the world through the eyes of the artists featured in todays post. These talented individuals see possibility in the things we throw away every day. Instead of heading to the art supply store they just collect common trash and turn it into works of amazing art. Take a look at these 40 terrific works of art made from common trash and be prepared to start looking at your garbage in a whole new way.

Artworks Made From Trash

Ann P. Smith
This awesome owl and bird sculpture was made from reclaimed electronic trash. It reminds me of the mechanical owl in The Clash of the Titans. Leer más “40 Terrific Works of Art Made From Common Trash”